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  • Embargo expired:
    5-Sep-2019 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 718413

Largest-Ever Ancient-DNA Study Illuminates Millennia of South and Central Asian Prehistory

Harvard Medical School

Researchers analyzed the genomes of 524 never before-studied ancient people, including the first genome of an individual from the ancient Indus Valley Civilization Insights answer longstanding questions about the origins of farming and the source of Indo-European languages in South and Central Asia Study increases the worldwide total of published ancient genomes by some 25 percent

Released:
3-Sep-2019 4:55 PM EDT
Newswise: Time to retire the 'pristine myth' of climate change

Article ID: 718257

Time to retire the 'pristine myth' of climate change

Washington University in St. Louis

A new, global synthesis of regional archaeological knowledge on land-use changes over the past 10,000 years reveals that humans have reshaped landscapes, ecosystems and potentially climate over millennia in a manner that challenges conventional ideas that man’s impact has been "mostly recent."

Released:
29-Aug-2019 2:05 PM EDT
Newswise: Crowdsourced archaeology shows how humans have influenced Earth for thousands of years
  • Embargo expired:
    29-Aug-2019 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 718093

Crowdsourced archaeology shows how humans have influenced Earth for thousands of years

University of Washington

A new map synthesized from more than 250 archaeologists worldwide, including from the University of Washington, argues that the human imprint on our planet's soil goes back much earlier than the nuclear age.

Released:
27-Aug-2019 2:00 PM EDT
Newswise: 210046_web.jpg

Article ID: 718226

First Human Ancestors Breastfed for Longer Than Contemporary Relatives

University of Bristol

By analysing the fossilised teeth of some of our most ancient ancestors, a team of scientists led by the universities of Bristol (UK) and Lyon (France) have discovered that the first humans significantly breastfed their infants for longer periods than their contemporary relatives.

Released:
29-Aug-2019 11:05 AM EDT
Newswise: 209644_web.jpg

Article ID: 718017

The Beginnings of Trade in Northwestern Europe During the Bronze Age

University of Göttingen

People in England were using balance weights and scales to measure the value of materials as early as the late second and early first millennia BC.

Released:
26-Aug-2019 3:05 PM EDT
Newswise: Cranial deformation as an indicator for cultural membership

Article ID: 717853

Cranial deformation as an indicator for cultural membership

University of Vienna

Led by Ron Pinhasi from the University of Vienna, Austria and Mario Novak from the Institute for Anthropological Research in Zagreb, Croatia the study combines bioarchaeological isotopic and ancient DNA methods to analyze the dietary patterns, sex, and genetic affinities of three Migration Period (5th century CE) individuals who were recovered from a pit in the city of Osijek in eastern Croatia. They are associated with the presence of various nomadic people such as the Huns and/or Germanic tribes like the Gepids and Ostrogoths in this part of Europe. The results of the study are published in the recent issue of "PLOS ONE".

Released:
22-Aug-2019 8:05 AM EDT
Newswise: Research Bias May Leave Some Primates at Risk

Article ID: 717431

Research Bias May Leave Some Primates at Risk

University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin)

Recent primate research has had a heavy focus on a few charismatic species and nationally protected parks and forests, leaving some lesser known primates and their habitats at risk, according researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and Santa Clara University.

Released:
13-Aug-2019 5:05 PM EDT
Newswise: Evidence of the 587/586 BCE Babylonian Conquest of Jerusalem Found in Mount Zion Excavation

Article ID: 717348

Evidence of the 587/586 BCE Babylonian Conquest of Jerusalem Found in Mount Zion Excavation

University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Researchers digging at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte’s ongoing archaeological excavation on Mount Zion in Jerusalem have announced a second significant discovery from the 2019 season – clear evidence of the Babylonian conquest of the city from 587/586 BCE.

Released:
12-Aug-2019 2:05 PM EDT

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