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Newswise: Fatal chirps: Nocturnal flight calls increase building collisions among migrating birds
  • Embargo expired:
    2-Apr-2019 8:05 PM EDT

Article ID: 710402

Fatal chirps: Nocturnal flight calls increase building collisions among migrating birds

University of Michigan

Birds that produce faint chirps called flight calls during nighttime migration collide with illuminated buildings much more often than closely related species that don't produce such calls, according to a new analysis of a 40-year record of thousands of building collisions in the Midwest.

Released:
29-Mar-2019 9:00 AM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    1-Apr-2019 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 710515

The evolution of bird-of-paradise sex chromosomes revealed

University of Vienna

Birds-of-paradise are a group of songbird species, and are known for their magnificent male plumage and bewildering sexual display. Now, an international collaborative work involving Dept. of Molecular Evolution and Development of University of Vienna, Zhejiang University of China, and Swedish Museum of Natural History analyzed all together 11 songbird species genomes, including those of five bird-of-paradise species, and reconstructed the evolutionary history of their sex chromosomes.

Released:
1-Apr-2019 5:05 AM EDT

Article ID: 710541

Study Names Top Cities Emitting Light that Endangers Migratory Birds

Cornell University

Scientists at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology have published new research highlighting artificial light at night as a contributing factor. They've ranked metropolitan areas where, due to a combination of light pollution and geography, birds are at the greatest risk of becoming attracted to and disoriented by lights and crashing into buildings. The research was published today in the journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. It combines satellite data showing light pollution levels with weather radar measuring bird migration density.

Released:
1-Apr-2019 10:05 AM EDT
Newswise: Birds bug out over coffee

Article ID: 710328

Birds bug out over coffee

University of Delaware

New University of Delaware research has found that migratory birds prefer foraging in native leguminous tree species over non-native and many other trees used on many coffee farms. The findings will help farmers choose trees that are best for both birds and business.

Released:
27-Mar-2019 2:05 PM EDT
Newswise: Bromethalin is poisoning the parrots of Telegraph Hill

Article ID: 709762

Bromethalin is poisoning the parrots of Telegraph Hill

University of Georgia

Bromethalin, a common rat poison, is the agent responsible for a neurological disease that has sickened or killed birds from a popular flock of naturalized parrots that reside primarily in the Telegraph Hill area in north San Francisco, according to a new study led by the University of Georgia Infectious Diseases Laboratory and funded by Mickaboo Companion Bird Rescue.

Released:
18-Mar-2019 2:05 PM EDT
Newswise: Why Fly the Coop? With Shortage of Mates, Some Birds Choose to Help Others Raise Offspring

Article ID: 709619

Why Fly the Coop? With Shortage of Mates, Some Birds Choose to Help Others Raise Offspring

Florida State University

After a five-year experiment, researchers from Florida State University and the Tallahassee-based Tall Timbers Research Station found that when fewer mates were available for brown-headed nuthatches, these small pine-forest birds opted to stay home and help their parents or other adults raise their offspring.

Released:
14-Mar-2019 9:40 AM EDT
Newswise: Protected areas could help large herbivores bounce back after war
  • Embargo expired:
    13-Mar-2019 2:05 PM EDT

Article ID: 709274

Protected areas could help large herbivores bounce back after war

PLOS

Large herbivore populations can substantially recover after war-induced declines, given that protected area management is provided, according to a study published March 13 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Marc Stalmans of Gorongosa National Park in Mozambique, and colleagues. But the community structure may take longer to restore, as the rate of recovery varies for different populations.

Released:
7-Mar-2019 11:20 AM EST
Newswise: Study: Climate Change is Leading to Unpredictable Ecosystem Disruption for Migratory Birds

Article ID: 709055

Study: Climate Change is Leading to Unpredictable Ecosystem Disruption for Migratory Birds

Cornell University

Using data on 77 North American migratory bird species from the eBird citizen-science program, scientists at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology say that, in as little as four decades, it may be very difficult to predict how climate change will affect migratory bird populations and the ecosystems they inhabit. Their conclusions are presented in a paper published in the journal Ecography.  

Released:
5-Mar-2019 3:10 AM EST
Newswise: Spring migration is now earlier in European and North American birds

Article ID: 708633

Spring migration is now earlier in European and North American birds

University of Helsinki

The greatest advances were found among short-distance migrants that winter in Europe or North America: about 1.5-2 days per decade. Long-distance migrants that winter in the tropics have also advanced the start of their migration

Released:
25-Feb-2019 12:05 PM EST
  • Embargo expired:
    21-Feb-2019 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 708014

How bird feather patterns form

PLOS

Feathers evolved in dinosaurs and are a key characteristic of birds today. They are arranged in a precise hexagonal pattern in a bird’s skin, but it has been unclear how this happens.

Released:
13-Feb-2019 8:30 AM EST

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