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  • Embargo expired:
    22-Aug-2013 7:05 PM EDT

Article ID: 606823

Drug Used for Blood Cancers May Stop Spread of Breast Cancer Cells

Mayo Clinic

A drug used to treat blood cancers may also stop the spread of invasive breast cancer, researchers at Mayo Clinic in Florida have discovered.

Released:
21-Aug-2013 5:00 PM EDT
Newswise: Receptor May Aid Spread of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s in Brain

Article ID: 606883

Receptor May Aid Spread of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s in Brain

Washington University in St. Louis

Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found a way that corrupted, disease-causing proteins spread in the brain, potentially contributing to Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and other brain-damaging disorders.

Released:
22-Aug-2013 7:00 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    22-Aug-2013 5:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 606669

Exercise Effective and Safe in Patients with Moderate Kidney Disease

American Society of Nephrology (ASN)

• A structured exercise and lifestyle program can help kidney disease patients become fitter and lose weight, and it can improve their heart health. • Exercise can be safe in patients with kidney disease even if they have various other medical problems.

Released:
19-Aug-2013 8:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    22-Aug-2013 5:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 606670

Researchers Identify Gene Variants That May Cause Kidney Problems in Lupus Patients

American Society of Nephrology (ASN)

• Variants in the gene that encodes ABIN1—which is involved in the control of inflammation—are linked with an increased risk for kidney complications in patients with lupus. • The finding may point to improved treatments for kidney complications in patients with the disease.

Released:
19-Aug-2013 8:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 606819

Gene Combinations and Interactions Affect Risk of Crohn's Disease

Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

A statistical model accounting for dozens of different genes in combination—and the interactions between them—is an important step forward in understanding the genetic factors affecting the risk of Crohn's disease (CD), reports a study in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, official journal of the Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America (CCFA). The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

Released:
22-Aug-2013 4:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 606869

The Stress and Cancer Link: ‘Master-Switch’ Stress Gene Enables Cancer’s Spread

Ohio State University

In an unexpected finding, scientists have linked the activation of a stress gene in immune-system cells to the spread of breast cancer to other parts of the body.

Released:
22-Aug-2013 4:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 606865

Single Injection May Revolutionize Melanoma Treatment

Moffitt Cancer Center

A new study at Moffitt Cancer Center could offer hope to people with melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. Researchers are investigating whether an injectable known as PV-10 can shrink tumors and reduce the spread of cancer. PV-10 is a solution developed from Rose Bengal, a water-soluble dye commonly used to stain damaged cells in the eye. Early clinical trials show PV-10 can boost immune response in melanoma tumors, as well as the blood stream.

Released:
22-Aug-2013 3:45 PM EDT
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Article ID: 606863

Study Adds Lung Damage to Harmful Effects of Arsenic

University of Chicago Medical Center

Exposure to low to moderate amounts of arsenic in drinking water can impair lung function. Doses of about 120 parts per billion of arsenic in well water produced lung damage comparable to decades of smoking tobacco.

Released:
22-Aug-2013 3:00 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    22-Aug-2013 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 606792

Obesity/Mortality Paradox Demonstrates Urgent Need for More Refined Metabolic Measures

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine point out that the body mass index (BMI), based on the weight and height, is not an accurate measure of body fat content and does not account for critical factors that contribute to health or mortality, such as fat distribution, proportion of muscle to fat, and the sex and racial differences in body composition.

Released:
21-Aug-2013 11:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    22-Aug-2013 12:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 606777

Study Helps Explain Why People with Red Hair Have A Higher Risk of Developing Melanoma

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Researchers from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine find that the same genetic mutation responsible for red hair also promotes a well-known cancer-causing pathway

Released:
21-Aug-2013 10:00 AM EDT

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