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Article ID: 603594

Study Looks at Sports-Related Facial Fractures in Kids, Reports Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

Facial fractures are relatively common, and potentially serious, sports-related injuries among children participating in a wide range of sports, according to a study in the June issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).

Released:
29-May-2013 11:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 603593

Gene Therapies for Regenerative Surgery Are Getting Closer, Says Review in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

Experimental genetic techniques may one day provide plastic and reconstructive surgeons with an invaluable tool—the ability to promote growth of the patient's own tissues for reconstructive surgery. A review of recent progress toward developing effective gene therapies for use in "regenerative surgery" appears in the June issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).

Released:
29-May-2013 11:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 603586

New Mayo Clinic Approach Could Lead to Blood Test to Diagnose Alzheimer’s in Earliest Stage

Mayo Clinic

Blood offers promise as a way to detect Alzheimer’s disease at its earliest onset, Mayo Clinic researchers say. They envision a test that would detect distinct metabolic signatures in blood plasma that are synonymous with the disease -- years before patients begin showing cognitive decline. Their study was recently published online in the journal PLOS ONE.

Released:
29-May-2013 10:25 AM EDT
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Article ID: 603598

Discovery by Physicists Furthers Understanding of Superconductivity

University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

Physicists at the University of Arkansas have collaborated with scientists in the United States and Asia to discover that a crucial ingredient of high-temperature superconductivity could be found in an entirely different class of materials.

Released:
29-May-2013 10:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 603585

The Value of Randomized Clinical Trials in Radiation Oncology Clinical Practice

University of North Carolina Health Care System

Cancer patients, physicians and insurers want to be sure that whatever therapy is recommended and provided to patients is based on evidence, preferably results from randomized clinical trials. But are there enough clinical trials data to provide this level of confidence?

Released:
29-May-2013 8:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 603569

Interventional Stroke Therapy Needs Further Study in Clinical Trials, Mayo Clinic Researchers Say

Mayo Clinic

Devices snaked into the brain artery of a patient experiencing a stroke that snatch and remove the offending clot, or pump a dissolving drug into the blockage, should primarily be used within a clinical trial setting, say a team of vascular neurologists at Mayo Clinic in Florida.

Released:
29-May-2013 8:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 603583

Paper Could Be Basis for Inexpensive Diagnostic Devices

Georgia Institute of Technology

Paper is known for its ability to absorb liquids. But by modifying the underlying network of cellulose fibers, etching off surface “fluff” and applying a thin chemical coating, researchers have created a new type of paper that repels a wide variety of liquids.

Released:
28-May-2013 7:00 PM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    28-May-2013 5:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 603441

Evolution in the Blink of an Eye

Cornell University

A novel disease in songbirds has rapidly evolved to become more harmful to its host on at least two separate occasions in just two decades, according to a new study. The research provides a real-life model to help understand how diseases that threaten humans can be expected to change in virulence as they emerge.

Released:
28-May-2013 2:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 603574

Simple ‘Frailty’ Test Predicts Death, Hospitalization For Kidney Dialysis Patients

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins scientists report that a 10-minute test for “frailty” first designed to predict whether the elderly can withstand surgery and other physical stress could be useful in assessing the increased risk of death and frequent hospitalization among kidney dialysis patients of any age.

Released:
28-May-2013 4:50 PM EDT

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