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Article ID: 532595

Significant National Computing Resources Allocated for Advanced Earthquake Research

University of Southern California (USC)

The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) more than 15 million service units of computer processing time on supercomputers nationwide.

Released:
17-Aug-2007 4:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 532597

Deadly Mine 'Bump' was Recorded as a Seismic Event

University of Utah

The University of Utah Seismograph Stations recorded a magnitude-1.6 seismic event at the time of a Thursday, Aug. 16 "bump" that killed and injured rescuers at a Utah coal mine where six miners were trapped by an Aug. 6 collapse.

Released:
17-Aug-2007 3:55 PM EDT
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Article ID: 532558

International Expert on Earthquake Disaster Reduction Available for Interviews

CRDF Global

Dr. Brian Tucker, founder and president of GeoHazards International, serves as an expert resource on earthquake safety; earthquake risk assessment and disaster potential; global repercussions of earthquake disasters in developing counties; and the growing urban earthquake risk in the 21st century.

Released:
16-Aug-2007 4:15 PM EDT
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Article ID: 532543

Earthquake Experts and Story Tips

American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Earthquake simulator for homes, ultrasounds assess quakes, jelly earthquake models from the American Institute of Physics.

Released:
16-Aug-2007 2:30 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    13-Aug-2007 5:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 532406

Tectonic Plates Act Like Variable Thermostat

University of Southern California (USC)

Heat loss from Earth's interior varies greatly with time and depends on size and number of plates, says PNAS study.

Released:
13-Aug-2007 12:35 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    1-Aug-2007 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 531954

Alaskan Earthquake in 2002 Set Off Tremors on Vancouver Island

University of Washington

Tremors rippled the landscape of Vancouver Island, the westernmost part of British Columbia, during a major Alaskan earthquake in 2002, and geoscientists at the University of Washington have found clear evidence that the two events were related.

Released:
30-Jul-2007 11:10 AM EDT
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Article ID: 531483

Fragmented Structure of Seafloor Faults May Dampen Effects of Earthquakes

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Many earthquakes in the deep ocean are much smaller in magnitude than expected. Geophysicists from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) have found new evidence that the fragmented structure of seafloor faults, along with previously unrecognized volcanic activity, may be dampening the effects of these quakes.

Released:
12-Jul-2007 4:10 PM EDT
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Article ID: 531405

Supercomputing On Demand: SDSC Supports Event-Driven Science

University of California San Diego

Somewhere in Southern California a large earthquake strikes without warning, and the news media and the public clamor for information about the temblor -- Where was the epicenter? How large was the quake? What areas did it impact? A picture is worth a thousand words "“ or numbers "“ and the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at UC San Diego is helping to provide the answers.

Released:
10-Jul-2007 6:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 531037

Geophysicists Detect Molten Rock Layer Below American Southwest

Arizona State University College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

A sheet of molten rock roughly 10 miles thick spreads underneath much of the American Southwest, some 250 miles below Tucson, Ariz. From the surface, you can't see it, smell it or feel it. But geophysicists detected the molten layer with a comparatively new and overlooked technique for exploring the deep Earth that uses magnetic eruptions on the sun.

Released:
22-Jun-2007 8:40 AM EDT
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Article ID: 530916

Scientists Report on Last Summer's "Stealth" Tsunami

Georgia Institute of Technology, Research Communications

Though categorized as magnitude 7.8, the earthquake could scarcely be felt by beachgoers that afternoon. A low tide and wind-driven waves disguised the signs of receding water, so when the tsunami struck, it caught even lifeguards by surprise. That contributed to the death toll of more than 600 persons in Java, Indonesia.

Released:
18-Jun-2007 2:05 PM EDT

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