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Article ID: 712228

Texas A&M-designed irrigation runoff mitigation system patented, available for licensing

Texas A&M AgriLife

COLLEGE STATION – Just as temperatures begin to heat up and lawns begin to seemingly beg for water, Texas A&M AgriLife faculty were recognized at a patent award banquet for their irrigation runoff mitigation system. With water waste a growing problem nationwide, an interdisciplinary team of engineers, irrigation researchers and turfgrass experts have spent the past two years designing a solution to conserve strained water supplies in municipal landscapes.

Released:
1-May-2019 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 712145

Pest-killing fungi could protect NYS grapes, apples from invasive insect

Cornell University

Cornell University-led research reports that two local fungal pathogens could potentially curb an invasive insect that has New York vineyard owners on edge.

Released:
30-Apr-2019 2:30 PM EDT
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Article ID: 712068

Glenn Burton: A leader of the 'Green Revolution'

University of Georgia

This story is part of a series, called Georgia Groundbreakers, that celebrates innovative and visionary faculty, students, alumni and leaders throughout the history of the University of Georgia—and their profound, enduring impact on our state, our nation and the world.

Released:
29-Apr-2019 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 712045

UF/IFAS Agricultural Engineering Professor Named Director of Florida Climate Institute

University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences

A University of Florida agricultural engineer who uses crop models to help farmers adapt to warmer, more erratic weather, will unite scientists to better deal with the impacts of an increasingly changing climate.

Released:
29-Apr-2019 1:55 PM EDT
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Article ID: 712063

Plant Cells Eat Their Own ... Membranes and Oil Droplets

Brookhaven National Laboratory

Biochemists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have discovered two ways that autophagy, or self-eating, controls the levels of oils in plant cells. The study describes how this cannibalistic-sounding process actually helps plants survive, and suggests a way to get bioenergy crops to accumulate more oil.

Released:
29-Apr-2019 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 712029

Ag Census Reveals First Reports of Kiwiberry Production in the Northeast;

University of New Hampshire

For the first time since the USDA began keeping statistics in 1840, farmers from several Northeast states, including New Hampshire, are reporting kiwifruit production operations. The news comes six years after the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire launched a kiwiberry research and breeding program.

Released:
29-Apr-2019 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 711888

Is Kelp the New Kale for Long Island?

Stony Brook University

In recent years, seaweeds have been notorious for washing up and fouling beaches on Long Island. Now, a collaborative team of scientists and marine farmers have demonstrated that the seaweed, sugar kelp, can be cultivated in the shallow estuaries of Long Island, a breakthrough that may unlock a wealth of economic and environmental opportunities for coastal communities.

Released:
25-Apr-2019 9:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    24-Apr-2019 8:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 711780

New research sheds light on genomic features that make plants good candidates for domestication

Iowa State University

New research details how the process of domestication affected the genomes of corn and soybeans. The study looked at sections of crop genomes and compared them to the genomes of ancestor species. The results shed new light on what makes a species a good candidate for domestication.

Released:
23-Apr-2019 11:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    24-Apr-2019 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 711671

Tomato, Tomat-oh! Understanding evolution to reduce pesticide use

Michigan State University

Michigan State University researchers believe pesticide use could be reduced by taking cues from wild plants. The team recently identified an evolutionary function in wild tomato plants that could be used by modern plant breeders to create pest-resistant tomatoes.

Released:
22-Apr-2019 10:05 AM EDT

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