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Newswise: Immunotherapy Keeps 87-year-old Man on the Job

Article ID: 713849

Immunotherapy Keeps 87-year-old Man on the Job

Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Five-year survival data for pembrolizumab patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer were presented June 1 at the 2019 ASCO Annual Meeting, May 31-June 4, in Chicago. The study results showed a marked improvement over 5-year survival rates in the pre-immunotherapy era, which averaged only 5.5%. Pembrolizumab increased the survival rate to 23.2% after five years in people with advanced non-small cell lung cancer who had not previously been treated with chemotherapy and to 15.5% in those who had been previously treated with chemotherapy. The KEYNOTE-001 is the longest follow-up study to date of people with advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with pembrolizumab.

Released:
3-Jun-2019 2:05 PM EDT
Newswise: Penn Receives $12 Million Grant to Study Connection Between Radiation and Immunotherapies

Article ID: 713798

Penn Receives $12 Million Grant to Study Connection Between Radiation and Immunotherapies

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

From understanding the genetics of cancer cells to improving cellular therapies and incorporating new methods of radiation therapy, a $12 million grant will help researchers at the Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania pursue the next generation of cancer treatments.

Released:
3-Jun-2019 10:00 AM EDT

Channels:

Cancer, Cell Biology, Immunology

Languages:

English

Newswise: Immunotherapy drug improves five-year survival rate of people with advanced lung cancer

Article ID: 713646

Immunotherapy drug improves five-year survival rate of people with advanced lung cancer

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

In a study led by UCLA investigators, treatment with the immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab helped more than 15% of people with advanced non-small cell lung cancer live for at least five years — and 25% of patients whose tumor cells had a specific protein lived at least that long.

Released:
1-Jun-2019 7:30 AM EDT
Newswise: Atlantic Health System Physicians Co-Author Studies to be Presented at American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting

Article ID: 713769

Atlantic Health System Physicians Co-Author Studies to be Presented at American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting

Atlantic Health System

Studies to be presented at the ASCO meeting are co-authored by research oncologists Eric Whitman, MD; Missak Haigentz, MD; and Angela Alistar, MD. Their ASCO studies include: two separate studies looking at TILS therapy and Keytruda for advanced melanoma; immunotherapy for metastatic head and neck cancer; treatment for recurrent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive nasopharyngeal carcinoma; and a combination of CPI-613 -- a new type of medication, pioneered by Dr. Alistar, known as an altered energy metabolism drug -- with 5-FU in treating metastatic colorectal cancer.

Released:
31-May-2019 2:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 713740

Platelet-Rich Fibrin May Lead to Better Outcomes with Fat Grafting

Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

A "second-generation" platelet concentrate called platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) might enhance the outcomes of fat grafting for plastic surgery procedures, reports an experimental study in the June issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).

Released:
31-May-2019 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 713718

African Mole-Rats Immune to ‘Wasabi Pain’

University of Illinois at Chicago

A new report in Science provides the first evidence of a mammal — the highveld mole-rat — being immune to pain from exposure to allyl isothiocyanate, or AITC, the active ingredient of wasabi.

Released:
30-May-2019 4:50 PM EDT
Newswise: Johns Hopkins Researchers Design New Blood Test That Uses DNA ‘Packaging’ Patterns to Detect Multiple Cancer Types
  • Embargo expired:
    29-May-2019 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 713528

Johns Hopkins Researchers Design New Blood Test That Uses DNA ‘Packaging’ Patterns to Detect Multiple Cancer Types

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have developed a simple new blood test that can detect the presence of seven different types of cancer by spotting unique patterns in the fragmentation of DNA shed from cancer cells and circulating in the bloodstream.

Released:
28-May-2019 11:00 AM EDT
Newswise: Patterns of chronic lymphocytic leukemia growth identified
  • Embargo expired:
    29-May-2019 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 713607

Patterns of chronic lymphocytic leukemia growth identified

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

In patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, the rate of disease growth is apt to follow one of three trajectories: relentlessly upward, steadily level, or something in between, scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Massachusetts General Hospital, and the University of Washington report in a new study.

Released:
29-May-2019 12:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 713427

Millions of women in low-and middle-income countries will need radiotherapy for cervical cancer treatment despite vaccination

University Health Network (UHN)

A first of its kind study is reporting that millions of women in low- and middle-income countries will need life-saving radiotherapy to treat their cervical cancer, despite the growth of essential human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination prevention programs.

Released:
29-May-2019 4:20 AM EDT
Newswise: Finding A Cell’s True Identity

Article ID: 713428

Finding A Cell’s True Identity

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Scientists have long sorted cells into different varieties based on their appearance under a microscope or, for differences that are more visually subtle, based on the behavior of a handful of genes. But in a bid to reveal even more distinctive differences and similarities, researchers from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, the Johns Hopkins Institute for Genetic Medicine and the Johns Hopkins Department of Neuroscience developed two new artificial intelligence methods that decipher complex gene activity controlling cell fate decisions in retina development and relate this gene activity to what occurs in other tissues and across different species.

Released:
28-May-2019 10:00 AM EDT

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