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Article ID: 715331

NIH Awards Five-Year, $24.2 Million Grant to UAMS Translational Research Institute

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

The University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) Translational Research Institute announced today it will receive five years of federal funding totaling $24.2 million to accelerate research that addresses Arkansas’ biggest health challenges. The Translational Research Institute helps researchers turn their ideas and findings into new medical treatments and other health interventions. Its focus is on rural Arkansas populations, where health and health care disparities persist. A major emphasis of the award is research partnerships with Arkansas communities to ensure that research supported by the institute aligns with the priorities and needs of Arkansans.

Released:
3-Jul-2019 12:05 PM EDT
Newswise: Saving Beethoven
  • Embargo expired:
    3-Jul-2019 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 715277

Saving Beethoven

Harvard Medical School

Scientists have used an optimized version of the CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing system to prevent hearing loss in so-called Beethoven mice, which carry a genetic mutation that causes profound hearing loss in humans and mice alike The new gene-editing system successfully identified a single misspelled “letter” in the defective copy of a hearing gene and disabled the aberrant copy, sparing the healthy one DNA analyses and follow-up tests in treated animals showed no detectable off-target effects Results offer proof of principle for using the same gene-editing technique in more than 20 percent of dominantly inherited human genetic diseases

Released:
2-Jul-2019 2:05 PM EDT
Newswise: Study Probes How to Tell Elderly Patients Not to Bother With Cancer Screening

Article ID: 715214

Study Probes How to Tell Elderly Patients Not to Bother With Cancer Screening

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Over the past decades, the idea that all adults should get regularly screened for cancer — with mammograms, colonoscopies and prostate specific antigen blood tests — has been conveyed to the public time after time. But current clinical guidelines recommend against screening many older adults, such as those with less than 10 years’ life expectancy. For doctors, talking to a patient about the idea that they’ve “aged out” of cancer screening can be a challenging conversation.

Released:
2-Jul-2019 10:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    2-Jul-2019 5:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 715121

Cardiac Genetic Mutation May Not Always Predict Heart Disease

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

One in 10 people with dilated cardiomyopathy were born with a mutation in the TTN gene, but – until now – it has been unclear whether everyone with these mutations will inevitably develop the condition. Researchers found that 95 percent of patients who had the genetic mutations did not have heart disease.

Released:
28-Jun-2019 1:05 PM EDT
Newswise: When Kinetics and Thermodynamics Should Play Together

Article ID: 715227

When Kinetics and Thermodynamics Should Play Together

Washington University in St. Louis

Research from the McKelvey School of Engineering suggests that without considering certain factors, researchers may overestimate how fast calcium carbonate forms in saline environments.

Released:
1-Jul-2019 4:40 PM EDT
Newswise: An Effort to Stop the Revolving Door for Hospital Patients May Be Spinning Its Wheels
  • Embargo expired:
    1-Jul-2019 4:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 715070

An Effort to Stop the Revolving Door for Hospital Patients May Be Spinning Its Wheels

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A new study shows that after several years of rapid improvements in hospital readmissions, the federal readmission penalty program may be spinning its wheels more than it’s slowing the spinning of the revolving hospital door. The findings come from an analysis of data from nearly 2.5 million Medicare patients who had hip or knee replacement surgery before and after readmission penalties affecting these operations were announced.

Released:
27-Jun-2019 11:05 AM EDT
Newswise: Researchers Identify New Way to Make Cancer Self-Destruct
  • Embargo expired:
    1-Jul-2019 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 715051

Researchers Identify New Way to Make Cancer Self-Destruct

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Researchers have identified a new pathway that can cause cancer to grow too quickly and die from the stress.

Released:
27-Jun-2019 11:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 715165

Researchers clock DNA’s recovery time after chemotherapy

American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB)

A team of researchers found that DNA damaged by the widely used chemotherapy drug cisplatin is almost fully repaired in noncancerous tissue within two days. These results could inform the timing of chemotherapy strategies and improve their efficacy.

Released:
1-Jul-2019 10:00 AM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    1-Jul-2019 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 715138

High doses of 60-plus year-old chemotherapy drug found to spur immune system attack on lymphoma

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Cyclophosphamide, a mainstay of chemotherapy for many cancers, acts as both chemotherapy and immunotherapy at high doses, study finds

Released:
28-Jun-2019 3:00 PM EDT

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