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Article ID: 586436

Genetics, Spanking May Increase Childhood Aggression

University of Texas at Dallas

A study co-authored by UT Dallas criminologist Dr. J.C. Barnes shows that the risk of problem behavior during childhood — particularly for boys — is greatly increased if children have genetic predispositions for these behaviors and if they are spanked by their parents.

Released:
5-Mar-2012 10:45 AM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Behavioral Science

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Article ID: 586348

Expert Available to Talk About Prevalence of Incivility, Disruptive Behavior

Boise State University

Incivility in American society is on the rise and rude and disruptive behavior is increasing in colleges and universities. Boise State University’s Dr. Cindy Clark, founder of Civility Matters, can provide an overview of incivility in nursing education, discuss how and why faculty and students contribute to incivility, and describe a range of evidence-based strategies to recognize, prevent and address incivility in nursing education and practice.

Released:
1-Mar-2012 10:40 AM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 586299

Winning Makes People More Aggressive Toward the Defeated

Ohio State University

In this world, there are winners and losers – and, for your own safety, it is best to fear the winners.

Released:
29-Feb-2012 9:10 AM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 586215

One-Way Romantic Attraction? Ways to Save Your Guy-Gal Friendship

Boise State University

When one friend admits they are “into” the other but the feeling isn't mutual, the relationship can indeed be in jeopardy. Friendships often dissolve under these circumstances, but not always, says Heidi Reeder, associate professor of communication at Boise State University.

Released:
27-Feb-2012 11:35 AM EST
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Article ID: 586211

Racioethnic Consistency Between Retail Employees and Customers Boosts Profit

Temple University

A nationwide study of racioethnic representation between retail employees and their customers finds that mirroring a customer base contributes to nearly $100,000 in annual gains or losses per store.

Released:
27-Feb-2012 11:15 AM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 586212

Work-Focused Psychotherapy Can Help Employees Return to Work Sooner

American Psychological Association (APA)

Employees on sick leave with common mental health disorders such as depression and anxiety fully returned to work sooner when therapy deals with work-related problems and how to get back on the job, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

Released:
27-Feb-2012 11:15 AM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 586129

Impulsive Kids Play More Video Games

American Psychological Association (APA)

Impulsive children with attention problems tend to play more video games, while kids in general who spend lots of time video gaming may also develop impulsivity and attention difficulties, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

Released:
23-Feb-2012 10:35 AM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 586101

Phobia's Effect on Perception of Feared Object Allows Fear to Persist

Ohio State University

The more afraid a person is of a spider, the bigger that individual perceives the spider to be, new research suggests.

Released:
22-Feb-2012 4:00 PM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 585928

Study Posits a Theory of Moral Behavior

American Sociological Association (ASA)

Why do some people behave morally while others do not? Sociologists at the University of California, Riverside and California State University, Northridge have developed a theory of the moral self that may help explain the ethical lapses in the banking, investment, and mortgage-lending industries that nearly ruined the U.S. economy.

Released:
21-Feb-2012 8:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 585929

Military Service Changes Personality, Makes Vets Less Agreeable

Washington University in St. Louis

It’s no secret that battlefield trauma can leave veterans with deep emotional scars that impact their ability to function in civilian life. But new research led by Washington University in St. Louis suggests that military service, even without combat, has a subtle lingering effect on a man’s personality, making it potentially more difficult for veterans to get along with friends, family and co-workers.

Released:
16-Feb-2012 7:20 PM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences


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