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Article ID: 555324

Bilinguals Unable to 'Turn Off' a Language Completely

Association for Psychological Science

According to a recent study, it appears humans are not actually capable of "turning off" another language entirely--knowledge of a second language actually has a continuous impact on native-language reading.

Released:
18-Aug-2009 1:20 PM EDT

Article ID: 555306

U.S.-born Asian-American Women More Likely to Think About, Attempt Suicide

University of Washington

Although Asian-Americans as a group have lower rates of thinking about and attempting suicide than the national average, U.S.-born Asian-American women seem to be particularly at risk for suicidal behavior.

Released:
17-Aug-2009 8:00 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Jeff-Todahl-1.jpg

Article ID: 555230

Little Safe Haven for Sexually Assaulted LGBTQ Victims

University of Oregon

Being a victim of sexual assault and seeking help is difficult for anyone, but when the victim is lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and/or queer (LGBTQ) the thought of reporting a crime may well be laced with added layers of uncertainty and mistrust, according to a study in Oregon.

Released:
13-Aug-2009 1:50 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 555114

Deployment Has Psychological Toll on Children in Military Families

Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

About one-third of children with a parent deployed in the Global War on Terror are at high risk for psychosocial problems, suggests a study in the August issue of the Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics.

Released:
11-Aug-2009 1:25 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 555018

How Language Can Affect Bodily Feelings

Association for Psychological Science

Merely seeing a smile (or a frown, for that matter) will activate the muscles in our face that make that expression, even if we are unaware of it. Now, according to a new study, simply reading emotion verbs may also have the same effect.

Released:
7-Aug-2009 10:00 AM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Ed-Vogel-2.jpg

Article ID: 554990

Beep, Beep, Oops, What Was I Doing?

University of Oregon

"That blasted siren. I can't focus." That reaction to undesired distraction may signal a person's low working-memory capacity, according to a new study. Based on a study of 84 students divided into four separate experiments, University of Oregon researchers found that students with high memory storage capacity were clearly better able to ignore distractions and stay focused on their assigned tasks.

Released:
6-Aug-2009 12:45 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Feldman_book_cover.jpg

Article ID: 554929

Professor's Book Dispels Myths about Lying, Deception

University of Massachusetts Amherst

Professor Robert Feldman says most of what we know about how and why people lie is wrong. Lying is common and people willingly accept and often welcome the lies they are told, he says. And it's hard to identify lying and liars. Feldman's new book, "The Liar in Your Life," has just been published.

Released:
5-Aug-2009 5:00 AM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 554890

Disturbed Sleep Among OEF/OIF Military Personnel and Veterans

Alliant International University

Research conducted by Dr. Taylor Plumb and Dr. Diane Zelman from the California School of Professional Psychology at Alliant International University shows high rates of disturbed sleep and indicators of possible sleep disorders experienced by current and former military personnel who served in Afghanistan or Iraq during Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) or Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF).

Released:
3-Aug-2009 4:00 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 554874

Study Shows Temptation Stronger Than We Realize

Association for Psychological Science

New research from the Kellogg School of Management demonstrates that individuals believe they have more restraint than they actually possess"”ultimately leading to poor decision-making.

Released:
3-Aug-2009 1:15 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • Embargo expired:
    27-Jul-2009 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 553874

REVISED: Getting Married "“ and Staying Married "“ Is Good for Your Health

Health Behavior News Service

A stable, long-term marriage can be good for your health, but divorce or widowhood leave a lasting scar on the health of middle-aged and older people, according to a new study. Remarriage seems to reduce but not erase the damage done by losing a marriage, and those who remain single after a marriage ends show consistently worse health than those who remarried.

Released:
30-Jun-2009 3:30 PM EDT

Showing results 42714280 of 4321

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