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Newswise: Mosquito Sperm Have “Sense of Smell”
  • Embargo expired:
    3-Feb-2014 3:00 PM EST

Article ID: 613083

Mosquito Sperm Have “Sense of Smell”

Vanderbilt University

Vanderbilt biologists have discovered that mosquito sperm have a “sense of smell” and that some of same chemicals that the mosquito can smell cause the sperm to swim harder.

Released:
30-Jan-2014 3:00 PM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 613150

Caring for Animals May Correlate with Positive Traits in Young Adults

Tufts University

Young adults who care for an animal may have stronger social relationships and connection to their communities, according to a paper published online today in Applied Developmental Science.

Released:
31-Jan-2014 1:00 PM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Newswise: Psychologists Find the Perceived Benefits of Casual Video Games Among Adults

Article ID: 613102

Psychologists Find the Perceived Benefits of Casual Video Games Among Adults

University of Massachusetts Amherst

New research finds that while a majority of adults cite the ability to compete with friends as their primary reason for playing online casual video games such as Bejeweled Blitz, they report differing perceived benefits from playing the games based upon their age.

Released:
30-Jan-2014 2:00 PM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • Embargo expired:
    29-Jan-2014 9:00 AM EST

Article ID: 612746

Measuring Brain Activity in Premature Infants

Journal of Visualized Experiments (JOVE)

On January 29, JoVE, the Journal of Visualized Experiments, will publish a procedure to identify newborns and children at-risk for developmental problems, especially those born prematurely. The technique is an infant friendly way of measuring brain activity using non-traditional methods, and it will aid in the invention of treatment strategies leveraging neural plasticity present in the first three years of life.

Released:
23-Jan-2014 10:55 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    21-Jan-2014 7:00 PM EST

Article ID: 612571

Toddlers’ Aggression Is Strongly Associated with Genetic Factors

Universite de Montreal

The development of physical aggression in toddlers is strongly associated genetic factors and to a lesser degree with the environment, according to a new study led by Eric Lacourse of the University of Montreal and its affiliated CHU Sainte-Justine Hospital. Lacourse’s worked with the parents of identical and non-identical twins to evaluate and compare their behaviour, environment and genetics.

Released:
20-Jan-2014 12:00 AM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 612389

Employment May Lead to Improvement in Autism Symptoms

Vanderbilt University

More independent work environments may lead to reductions in autism symptoms and improve daily living in adults with the disorder, according to a new study released in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders.

Released:
14-Jan-2014 11:20 AM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • Embargo expired:
    14-Jan-2014 8:00 AM EST

Article ID: 612204

Social Experience Drives Empathetic, Pro-Social Behavior in Rats

University of Chicago Medical Center

Empathy-driven behavior has been observed in rats who will free trapped companions from restrainers. This behavior also extends toward strangers, but requires prior, positive social interactions with the type (strain) of the unfamiliar individual, report scientists from the University of Chicago in the open access journal eLife, on Jan. 14. The findings suggest that social experiences, not genetics or kin selection, determine whether an individual will help strangers out of empathy. The importance of social experience extends even to rats of the same strain—a rat fostered and raised with a strain different than itself will not help strangers of its own kind.

Released:
8-Jan-2014 5:00 PM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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  • Embargo expired:
    12-Jan-2014 1:00 PM EST

Article ID: 612258

It’s All Coming Back to Me Now: Researchers Find Caffeine Enhances Memory

Johns Hopkins University

Caffeine is the energy boost of choice for millions. Now, however, researchers have found another use for the stimulant: memory enhancer.

Released:
9-Jan-2014 4:00 PM EST
Newswise: Infants Show Ability to Tell Friends From Foes

Article ID: 612173

Infants Show Ability to Tell Friends From Foes

University of Chicago

Even before babies have language skills or much information about social structures, they can infer whether other people are likely to be friends by observing their likes and dislikes, a new study on infant cognition has found.

Released:
8-Jan-2014 12:00 PM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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  • Embargo expired:
    6-Jan-2014 12:00 AM EST

Article ID: 611992

Virus Fans the Flames of Desire in Infected Crickets

Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology (SICB)

Love may be a battlefield, but most wouldn't expect the fighters to be a parasitic virus and its cricket host. Just like a common cold changes our behavior, sick crickets typically lose interest in everyday activities. But when Dr. Shelley Adamo of Dalhousie University found her cricket colony decimated by a pathogen, she was shocked that the dying insects didn't act sick. Not only had the infected crickets lost their usual starvation response, but they also continued to mate. A lot. How were the pathogen and the exuberant amorous behavior in the sick crickets connected?

Released:
1-Jan-2014 6:00 PM EST

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