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Article ID: 553910

Peer Behavior, Not Communication Overload, Determines Mobile Device Use in Meetings

University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin)

Organizational norms and social cues, not communication overload, are the strongest predictors of whether individuals use their laptops or smart phones to electronically multitask during a meeting, according to researchers at The University of Texas at Austin.

Released:
1-Jul-2009 3:45 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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  • Embargo expired:
    1-Jul-2009 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 553740

People Sometimes Seek the Truth, but Most Prefer Like-minded Views

American Psychological Association (APA)

We swim in a sea of information, but filter out most of what we see or hear. New analysis of data from dozens of studies sheds new light on how we choose what we do and do not hear. The study found that while people tend to avoid information that contradicts what they already think or believe, certain factors can cause them to seek out, or at least consider, other points of view.

Released:
25-Jun-2009 1:35 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 553644

Psychology Researchers Finding Patriotic Music May Close Minds, Children's Music May Open Them

Kansas State University

A study of the behaviors elicited from the musical lyrics of common songs is showing that patriotic songs may make participants close-minded and prejudiced while songs like "Itsy Bitsy Spider" and "Row, Row, Row Your Boat" may stimulate a pro-social response.

Released:
23-Jun-2009 11:30 AM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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  • Embargo expired:
    17-Jun-2009 12:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 553480

Study Supports Validity of Test That Indicates Widespread Unconscious Bias

University of Washington

A new study validates the controversial finding that the Implicit Association Test indicated that about 70 percent of those people who took a version of the test that measures racial attitudes have unconscious preference for white people compared to blacks. This compared with figures general under 20 percent for self-reported measures of race bias.

Released:
17-Jun-2009 1:55 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 553444

Putting a Name to a Face May be Key to Brain's Facial Expertise

Vanderbilt University

Our tendency to see people and faces as individuals may explain why we are such experts at recognizing them, new research indicates. This approach can be learned and applied to other objects as well.

Released:
16-Jun-2009 3:30 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 553332

Proximity Defines How We Think of Contagion

Association for Psychological Science

These results reveal that we tend to view products that are grouped close together as being "contagious." It appears that if one of the products has a prominent good or bad quality, we will see that quality as spreading among other objects which are close by, a phenomenon known as the "group-contagion effect."

Released:
12-Jun-2009 10:40 AM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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  • Embargo expired:
    8-Jun-2009 5:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 553033

Creative Problem Solving Enhanced by REM Sleep

University of California San Diego

Research led by a leading expert on the positive benefits of napping at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine suggests that Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep enhances creative problem-solving. The findings may have important implications for how sleep, specifically REM sleep, fosters the formation of associative networks in the brain.

Released:
3-Jun-2009 12:00 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 553027

Men and Women Equally Picky When Selecting a Mate

Association for Psychological Science

A new speed dating study finds that, regardless of gender, participants who rotated experienced greater romantic desire for and chemistry with their partners, compared to participants who sat throughout the event. The results suggest a fascinating alternative explanation for the sex difference in romantic selectivity.

Released:
3-Jun-2009 10:10 AM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 553013

Why Dishing Does You Good

University of Michigan

Why does dishing with a girlfriend do wonders for a woman's mood? A University of Michigan study has identified a likely reason: feeling emotionally close to a friend increases levels of the hormone progesterone, helping to boost well-being and reduce anxiety and stress.

Released:
2-Jun-2009 4:45 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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  • Embargo expired:
    1-Jun-2009 5:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 552786

Culture, Not Biology, Underpins Math Gender Gap

University of Wisconsin-Madison

For more than a century, the notion that females are innately less capable than males at doing mathematics, especially at the highest levels, has persisted in even the loftiest circles.

Released:
27-May-2009 12:40 PM EDT

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