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  • Embargo expired:
    7-Dec-2010 12:00 AM EST

Article ID: 571297

Study Reveals ‘Secret Ingredient’ in Religion that Makes People Happier

American Sociological Association (ASA)

While the positive correlation between religiosity and life satisfaction has long been known, a new study in the December issue of the American Sociological Review reveals religion’s “secret ingredient” that makes people happier.

Released:
1-Dec-2010 1:30 PM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 571484

Exposure to More Diverse Objects Helps Tots Learn Words More Quickly

University of Iowa

Research by a University of Iowa psychologists finds that tots who played with a broad array of objects learned new words twice as fast as those who played with a less diverse set of similar objects.

Released:
6-Dec-2010 1:45 PM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 571400

Study Links 1930 Bank Suspensions to Contemporary Suicide Rates

University of Iowa

Depression-era bank suspensions have had a lasting harmful effect on the hardest-hit communities, affecting suicide rates and disheartening residents decades down the road, a new University of Iowa study suggests.

Released:
3-Dec-2010 9:00 AM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 571381

Keeping Calm in an Anxious Age

Northwestern University

Americans' danger detectors are cranked up way too high these days, but we don't have to be held hostage by our anxiety, according to a new book on coping with stress by a Northwestern Medicine psychologist.

Released:
2-Dec-2010 4:00 PM EST
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Article ID: 571379

Prodigal Son

Northwestern University

George W. Bush’s decision to invade Iraq following the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, arguably was the most important decision of his presidency. That momentous decision also is central to understanding the psychological makeup of one of the most polarizing figures in American history, according to a new book by Dan McAdams, chair and professor of psychology in the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences at Northwestern University.

Released:
2-Dec-2010 3:00 PM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 571271

New Psychology Theory Enables Computers To Mimic Human Creativity

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

A mathematical model based on psychology theory allows computers to mimic human creative problem-solving, and provides a new roadmap to architects of artificial intelligence.

Released:
1-Dec-2010 11:45 AM EST
Newswise: New Study Suggests That a Propensity for One-Night Stands, Uncommitted Sex Could be Genetic

Article ID: 571227

New Study Suggests That a Propensity for One-Night Stands, Uncommitted Sex Could be Genetic

Binghamton University, State University of New York

So, he or she has cheated on you for the umpteenth time and their only excuse is: “I just can’t help it.” According to researchers at Binghamton University, they may be right. The propensity for infidelity could very well be in their DNA.

Released:
30-Nov-2010 5:00 PM EST
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Article ID: 571154

Narcissistic Students Don't Mind Cheating Their Way to the Top

Ohio State University

College students who exhibit narcissistic tendencies are more likely than fellow students to cheat on exams and assignments, a new study shows.

Released:
30-Nov-2010 3:45 PM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 571155

Researchers Find Link Between Sugar, Diabetes and Aggression

Ohio State University

A spoonful of sugar may be enough to cool a hot temper, at least for a short time, according to new research.

Released:
30-Nov-2010 3:45 PM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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  • Embargo expired:
    29-Nov-2010 3:00 PM EST

Article ID: 571174

Neuroscience of Instinct: How Animals Overcome Fear to Obtain Food

University of Washington

When crossing a street, we look to the left and right for cars and stay put on the sidewalk if we see a car close enough and traveling fast enough to hit us before we’re able to reach the other side. It’s an almost automatic decision, as though we instinctively know how to keep ourselves safe. Now neuroscientists have found that other animals are capable of making similar instinctive safety decisions.

Released:
29-Nov-2010 2:35 PM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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