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Children More Accepting of Peers Who Try to Change an Undesirable Characteristic than Those Believed to be at Fault for It

Kansas State University

Psychologists looked at the extent to which children attribute fault to peers with undesirable characteristics, and how they anticipate interacting with these peers. They found that obese and aggressive peers are disliked and blamed for having these faults.

Channels: Behavioral Science,

Released:
10-Oct-2011 12:40 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Delays in Video Calls May Not Always Hurt Communication

Ohio State University

A new study reveals how the delay computer users sometimes experience when making video calls over the internet can actually help communication in some circumstances, while it is frustrating in many others.

Channels: Technology, Behavioral Science,

Released:
10-Oct-2011 12:00 PM EDT
Research Results

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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  • Embargo expired:
    7-Oct-2011 1:00 PM EDT

Babies Show Sense of Fairness, Altruism as Early as 15 Months

University of Washington

A new study presents the first evidence that a basic sense of fairness and altruism appears in infancy. Babies as young as 15 months perceived the difference between equal and unequal distribution of food, and their awareness of equal rations was linked to their willingness to share a toy.

Channels: Behavioral Science, Cognition and Learning,

Released:
3-Oct-2011 12:30 PM EDT
Research Results

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Newswise: Children Find Human-Made Objects More Likely to be Owned than Natural Objects

Children Find Human-Made Objects More Likely to be Owned than Natural Objects

American Psychological Association (APA)

Children as young as 3 are likely to say that things made by humans have owners, but that natural objects, such as pine cones and sea shells, are not owned, according to a new study published by the American Psychological Association.

Channels: Behavioral Science, Staff Picks,

Released:
6-Oct-2011 11:00 AM EDT
Research Results

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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We Are What We Experience

Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU)

Our life experiences – the ups and downs, and everything in between – shape us, stay with us and influence our emotional set point as adults, according to a new study led by Virginia Commonwealth University researchers.

Channels: Behavioral Science, Mental Health,

Released:
5-Oct-2011 3:05 PM EDT
Research Results

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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How Chronic Stress Short-Circuits Parenting

University of Rochester

Parents under long-term stress often find it challenging to tap into the patience, responsiveness, and energy required for effective child rearing. Now research from a University of Rochester team helps to explain why chronic stress and parenting are such a toxic mix. The study finds that ongoing strains, like poverty or depression, disrupt the body’s natural stress response, making mothers more likely to engage in a host of problematic parenting behaviors.

Channels: Behavioral Science, In the Home,

Released:
5-Oct-2011 2:20 PM EDT
Research Results

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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College Football Players Can Cry (A Little) If They Want to

American Psychological Association (APA)

While there’s no crying in baseball, as Tom Hanks’ character famously proclaimed in “A League of Their Own,” crying in college football might not be a bad thing, at least in the eyes of one’s teammates.

Channels: Behavioral Science, Sports,

Released:
3-Oct-2011 11:25 AM EDT
Research Results

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Everyone’s a Little Bit Racist, but It May Not Be Your Fault, Study Suggests

Georgia Institute of Technology

In looking for the culprit as to why people tend to display tinges of racism, sexism or ageism, even towards members of their own group, a research team, led by the Georgia Institute of Technology, found that our culture may be partially to blame. The research is posted in the latest edition of the British Journal of Social Psychology.

Channels: Behavioral Science,

Released:
29-Sep-2011 10:50 AM EDT
Research Results

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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  • Embargo expired:
    29-Sep-2011 12:05 AM EDT

Single Dose of Hallucinogen May Create Lasting Personality Change

Johns Hopkins Medicine

A single high dose of the hallucinogen psilocybin, the active ingredient in so-called “magic mushrooms,” was enough to bring about a measureable personality change lasting at least a year in nearly 60 percent of the 51 participants in a new study, according to the Johns Hopkins researchers who conducted it.

Channels: Behavioral Science, Staff Picks,

Released:
28-Sep-2011 9:00 AM EDT
Research Results

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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High Social Status Makes People More Trusting

Ohio State University

When you start a new job, your boss may be more likely to trust you than you are to trust him or her, a new study suggests. The reason has to with the role that social status plays in relationships.

Channels: Behavioral Science, In the Workplace,

Released:
28-Sep-2011 9:00 AM EDT
Research Results

Social and Behavioral Sciences


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