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  • Embargo expired:
    14-May-2019 7:05 PM EDT

Article ID: 712789

In Guppy Courtship, the Unusual Male Wins

Florida State University

New FSU Study Shows Psychological Concept Underpins Mating Choices

Released:
13-May-2019 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 712857

Being Wise Is Good for Your Health – Review Looks at Emerging Science of Wisdom

Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

Can science measure what it means to be wise? A growing body of evidence suggests that wisdom is a complex concept that contributes to mental health and happiness, according to a review in the May/June issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Released:
14-May-2019 2:05 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 712864

Postpartum depression: For impoverished mothers of color, it takes a community

University at Buffalo

Treating postpartum depression (PPD) in low-income mothers of color requires an understanding of each person’s lived experience, and practitioners should consider interventions that develop broadly from a community level in order to improve outcomes for their clients, according to a University at Buffalo social work researcher.

Released:
14-May-2019 2:05 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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  • Embargo expired:
    14-May-2019 1:30 PM EDT

Article ID: 712654

New Study Shows Toddlers Are Great at Getting the Conversation Started

Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

Conversation is an important part of what makes us human. Previous research has shown that children begin to develop this skill at a young age. While many assume that mothers instigate communication with their children, new research suggests that children are the ones who get the conversation started. “I was surprised that kids were drivers of conversation,” said Mark VanDam, who will present his team’s research findings at the 177th ASA Meeting, May 13-17.

Released:
10-May-2019 11:15 AM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 712850

New study finds people are using Twitter to bridge political divides

SAGE Publications UK

Given the current atmosphere of political polarization, conventional wisdom suggests that conversations about politics

Released:
14-May-2019 1:05 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 712826

Work Experience Poor Predictor of Future Job Performance

Florida State University

A five-year study led by researchers at Florida State University concludes a person's past work experience is a poor predictor of performance in a new job.

Released:
14-May-2019 10:05 AM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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  • Embargo expired:
    14-May-2019 10:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 712745

Take two (attempts): Hope for overcoming substance use disorders

Research Society on Alcoholism

Alcohol and drug problems are often described as ‘chronically relapsing’ conditions, implying that multiple recovery attempts are needed before an addiction can be overcome for good. However, a new study by researchers at Harvard Medical School indicates that most people with an alcohol or drug problem achieve resolution after a surprisingly small number of serious quit attempts.

Released:
13-May-2019 12:05 AM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 712814

New Doctors’ DNA Ages Six Times Faster Than Normal in First Year

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Every summer, tens of thousands of newly minted doctors start the most intense year of their training: the first year of residency, also called the intern year. A new study suggests that the experience will make their DNA age six times faster than normal. And the effect will be largest among those whose training programs demand the longest hours.

Released:
14-May-2019 9:40 AM EDT

Article ID: 712818

Coffee addicts really do wake up and smell the coffee

University of Portsmouth

Regular coffee drinkers can sniff out even tiny amounts of coffee and are faster at recognising the aroma, compared to non-coffee drinkers, new research has found.

Released:
14-May-2019 9:05 AM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • Embargo expired:
    14-May-2019 5:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 712801

Study: Treats Might Mask Animal Intelligence

Johns Hopkins University

Rewards are necessary for learning, but may actually mask true knowledge, finds a new Johns Hopkins University study with rodents and ferrets.

Released:
13-May-2019 5:05 PM EDT

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