Feature Channels:

All Journal News

Add to Favorites Subscribe Share
fbshare-All Journal News
Press "esc" to clear
Go to Advanced Search
Showing results 4150 of 36460
TumorinaDishClose-upcropped.jpg

Article ID: 708236

Mimicking Metastasis in a Dish

University of Kansas Cancer Center

Researchers at The University of Kansas Cancer Center have developed a first-of-its-kind organoid that mirrors the process of cancer spreading to the lung.

Released:
18-Feb-2019 12:05 PM EST
hrt-logo.gif

Article ID: 708238

Hormone therapy may increase cardiovascular risk during gender transition

American Heart Association (AHA)

Patients receiving hormone therapy as part of their gender-transition treatment had an elevated risk for cardiovascular events, including strokes, heart attacks and blood clots, according to a study published in the American Heart Association's journal Circulation.

Released:
18-Feb-2019 12:05 PM EST

Article ID: 708237

Study Finds Low Statin Use Among Kidney Disease Patients at High Risk for Cardiovascular Disease

Loyola University Health System

Cholesterol-lowering statin drugs reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease in kidney disease patients who are not on dialysis. But a new study finds that statins are used by only 21.8 percent such patients who do not already have cardiovascular disease or diabetes or have not been diagnosed with high cholesterol.

Released:
18-Feb-2019 12:05 PM EST
192918_web.jpg

Article ID: 708231

Political and policy feedbacks in the climate system

University of California, Santa Barbara

Matto Mildenberger, University of California Santa Barbara explains how perceived experiences with climate change in the United States can be linked to political shifts in Congress, culture and society.

Released:
18-Feb-2019 12:05 PM EST
BES-2019-02-a-lrg.jpg

Article ID: 707962

Taking Diamond Qubits for a Spin

Department of Energy, Office of Science

Scientists use implanted silicon ions and electricity to increase the spin time of quantum bits, moving closer to the tech needed for quantum networks.

Released:
18-Feb-2019 11:05 AM EST

Article ID: 708224

Prevention, Treatment Efforts Reduce HIV Infection among Transgender Women

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Programs to prevent HIV in transgender women are helping to lower the rate of new infection but better care and treatment of this vulnerable population is still needed, especially among those of lower income or people of color, according to a new Rutgers study.

Released:
18-Feb-2019 11:05 AM EST
193068_web.jpg

Article ID: 708223

Diversity on land is not higher today than in the past, study shows

University of Birmingham

The rich levels of biodiversity on land seen across the globe today are not a recent phenomenon: diversity on land has been similar for at least the last 60 million years, since soon after the extinction of the dinosaurs.

Released:
18-Feb-2019 11:05 AM EST
NamekawaNatSMBchromsomecapture.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    18-Feb-2019 11:00 AM EST

Article ID: 708089

Scientists Reveal How 3D Arrangement of DNA Helps Perpetuate the Species

Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

From fathers to children, the delivery of hereditary information requires the careful packing of DNA in sperm. But just how nature packages this DNA to prepare offspring isn’t clear. Using new technology to reveal the 3D organization of DNA in maturing male reproductive cells, scientists revealed a crucial period in development that helps explain how fathers pass on genetic information to future generations.

Released:
14-Feb-2019 11:05 AM EST
  • Embargo expired:
    18-Feb-2019 11:00 AM EST

Article ID: 708129

Has Screen Time Increased for Young Children and on What Screen?

JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association

Children younger than 6 spend most of their screen time watching TV. That’s the finding of a new study that assessed screen time in young children in 1997 and in 2014, before and after mobile devices were widely available.

Released:
14-Feb-2019 2:05 PM EST
  • Embargo expired:
    18-Feb-2019 11:00 AM EST

Article ID: 708139

Researchers find trigger that turns strep infections into flesh-eating disease

Houston Methodist

Houston Methodist scientists discovered a previously unknown trigger that turns run-of-the-mill strep infections into the flesh-eating disease childbed fever, which strikes postpartum moms and newborns, often leaving victims without limbs. Using an unprecedented approach, they looked at the interplay between the genome, transcriptome and virulence. This generated a massive data set, lending itself to artificial intelligence analysis. Through AI they unexpectedly discovered a new mechanism controlling virulence. The study appears Feb. 18 in Nature Genetics.

Released:
14-Feb-2019 4:05 PM EST

Showing results 4150 of 36460

Chat now!