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  • Embargo expired:
    20-May-2019 10:15 AM EDT

Article ID: 712556

Cardiac MRI May Lead to Targeted PAH Therapy

American Thoracic Society (ATS)

Patients at greatest risk of dying from pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) may be identified through cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the information the noninvasive scan provides about the functional level of the heart’s right ventricle, according to research presented at ATS 2019.

Released:
13-May-2019 8:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 713136

ISPOR Honors Global Leaders in Health Economics and Outcomes Research at Annual Awards Banquet

ISPOR—The Professional Society for Health Economics and Outcomes Research

ISPOR—the professional society for health economics and outcomes research (HEOR)—honored global leaders in the field at its Annual Awards Banquet last night.

Released:
20-May-2019 9:00 AM EDT
PAH.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    19-May-2019 3:45 PM EDT

Article ID: 712481

Tumor-Suppressing Protein May Be Novel Target in PAH Therapy

American Thoracic Society (ATS)

In addition to suppressing tumors, the protein tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2) may play a role in preventing or treating pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), according to research presented at ATS 2019.

Released:
13-May-2019 8:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    19-May-2019 3:45 PM EDT

Article ID: 713067

Deep Sedation and Controlled Paralysis Do Not Improve Survival of Critically Ill Patients with Severe Breathing Difficulty

Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Reversibly paralyzing and heavily sedating hospitalized patients with severe breathing problems do not improve outcomes in most cases, according to a clinical trial conducted at dozens of North American hospitals. The trial settles a long-standing debate in the critical care medicine community.

Released:
16-May-2019 5:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    19-May-2019 3:15 PM EDT

Article ID: 712810

Risk Score Guided Care Can Help Physicians Provide Better Care, Planning, and Services for High-Risk Pulmonary Patients, Study Finds

Intermountain Healthcare

A study of more than 17,000 patients finds a new laboratory-based method of estimating outcomes for patients with COPD may help physicians better provide proper care, referrals, and services for these patients at the end of life.

Released:
14-May-2019 8:05 AM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    19-May-2019 3:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 713070

Big Data Reveals Hidden Subtypes of Sepsis

Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Much like cancer, sepsis isn’t simply one condition, but rather many conditions with varying clinical characteristics that could benefit from different treatments, according to a study involving more than 100,000 patients. The findings could explain why several recent clinical trials have failed.

Released:
16-May-2019 5:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    19-May-2019 10:15 AM EDT

Article ID: 712574

Bacterial Pneumonia Predicts Ongoing Lung Problems in Infants Hospitalized for Acute Respiratory Failure

American Thoracic Society (ATS)

Bacterial pneumonia appears to be linked to ongoing breathing problems in previously healthy infants who were hospitalized in a pediatric intensive care unit for acute respiratory failure, according to research presented at ATS 2019.

Released:
13-May-2019 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 712942

Using Nitric Oxide in Medicinal Strategies Optimizes Replacing, Engineering or Regenerating Human Cells

Nathan Bryan, Ph.D.

More than one million stem cell treatments have been conducted in the United States during the past ten years. Physicians and other healthcare providers are beginning to realize regenerative medicine is the future of medicine; however major health issues remain unanswered. Dr. Nathan Bryan, one the country’s leading experts in the mechanism of nitric oxide, will tell more than seven thousand physicians attending the 27th Annual Spring Conference of the American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine on Saturday that “the ability to use our own cells to heal our own body make good medical sense.

Released:
17-May-2019 2:40 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    16-May-2019 4:30 PM EDT

Article ID: 712672

Ultrasound Used To Trigger Insulin Release in Mice Shows Promise for Future Diabetes Therapy

Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

Current treatments of Type 2 diabetes can help the body use insulin at various stages of the disease, but they can also be expensive and subject patients to lifelong medication regimens and side effects. Thanks to new therapeutic ultrasound technology, one promising alternative looks to reshape how early Type 2 diabetes is managed. A group of researchers has used ultrasound therapy to stimulate insulin release from mice on demand. The team will present their findings at the 177th ASA Meeting, May 13-17.

Released:
10-May-2019 11:20 AM EDT

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