Press "esc" to clear
Go to Advanced Search
Showing results 5160 of 5453

Article ID: 701671

NYU Meyers Receives $3.47 Million NIH Grant to Improve Oral Health Among People with Dementia

New York University

The National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research and National Institute on Aging have awarded the NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing with funding to improve the oral hygiene of people with mild dementia. The $3.47 million, five-year grant will be used to implement and study a unique oral health intervention involving family caregivers in New York and North Carolina.

Released:
4-Oct-2018 12:05 PM EDT

Article ID: 701655

'Double agent' in the immune system may make us vulnerable to bacterial infections

Scripps Research Institute

Scientists at Scripps Research have discovered the role of an immune system double agent. This molecule, called USP18, can help curtail immune responses, but it can also open the door to bacterial infections, such as harmful listeria and staph infections.

Released:
4-Oct-2018 11:05 AM EDT
BIM.jpg

Article ID: 701645

Amputation injury is communicated to opposing limbs

Tufts University

In research that extends knowledge about the physiology of regeneration and wound repair, Tufts University biologists have discovered that amputation of one limb is immediately reflected in the bioelectric properties of the contralateral, or opposing, un-damaged limb of developing frogs.

Released:
4-Oct-2018 11:05 AM EDT
BrownEricgraphicalabstractOct2018.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    4-Oct-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 701553

Analysis Reveals Genomic Effects of a New Cancer Treatment Now in Clinical Trials

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

A twist on the molecular mechanism of how a new cancer drug works could aid in better identifying the best treatments for patients for an array of cancers. The team identified over 500 sites in DNA that require an enzyme called ATR checkpoint kinase to not break when they are replicated.

Released:
3-Oct-2018 12:05 PM EDT
Monica-Zaring_Saul_Wilson.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    4-Oct-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 701559

Solving a medical mystery: Cause of rare type of dwarfism discovered

Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute

For children born with Saul-Wilson syndrome, and their parents, much of their lives are spent searching for answers. First defined in 1990, only 14 cases are known worldwide. Today, these individuals have answers. A study published today in the American Journal of Human Genetics, has uncovered the cause of Saul-Wilson syndrome.

Released:
3-Oct-2018 1:35 PM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    4-Oct-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 701570

Viruses in Blood Lead to Digestive Problems

Washington University in St. Louis

Some people suffer unpredictable bouts of abdominal pain and constipation. A new study in mice, from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, shows that viruses that target the nervous system can kill neurons in the gut that coordinate the process of moving waste along. Such viruses may be involved in causing people's digestive woes.

Released:
3-Oct-2018 1:15 PM EDT
PaulDayton-Horizontal.jpg

Article ID: 701641

Study focused on improving radiation treatment for cancers in pet dogs

University of North Carolina Health Care System

A UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researcher and his colleagues have been awarded a five-year, $3.2 million grant from the National Cancer Institute to investigate how to improve radiation treatment for dogs undergoing treatment for sarcoma.

Released:
4-Oct-2018 10:05 AM EDT

Article ID: 701566

What You Can’t See Can Hurt You

University of Utah

Engineers from the University of Utah’s School of Computing conducted a study to determine if homeowners change the way they live if they could visualize the air quality in their house. They provide homeowners pollution sensors and a tablet to see the air quality data in their homes.

Released:
4-Oct-2018 8:00 AM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    4-Oct-2018 12:05 AM EDT

Article ID: 701276

Mouse Study Mirrors Human Findings That Link Chemotherapy and APOE4 to Cognitive Issues

Georgetown University Medical Center

A chemotherapy drug commonly used to treat breast cancer alters brain structure and function in mice that express the human APOE4 gene, known to significantly increase risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease, according to a study led by Georgetown investigators.

Released:
28-Sep-2018 4:00 AM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    3-Oct-2018 4:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 701271

First Large Study Details Cognitive Outcomes Among Older Breast Cancer Patients

Georgetown University Medical Center

The first large U.S. study of cognition in older breast cancer patients found that within the first two years after diagnosis and treatment, most women do not experience cancer-related cognitive problems.

Released:
28-Sep-2018 4:00 AM EDT

Showing results 5160 of 5453

Chat now!