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Article ID: 700918

AFib linked to family history in blacks, Latinos

University of Illinois at Chicago

Study shows there is a genetic predisposition to early-onset AFib in blacks and Latinos that is greater than what is observed in whites.

Released:
21-Sep-2018 12:05 PM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    21-Sep-2018 5:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 700800

It’s Not Just for Kids -- Even Adults Appear to Benefit from a Regular Bedtime

Duke Health

In a study of 1,978 older adults publishing Sept. 21 in the journal Scientific Reports, researchers at Duke Health and the Duke Clinical Research Institute found people with irregular sleep patterns weighed more, had higher blood sugar, higher blood pressure, and a higher projected risk of having a heart attack or stroke within 10 years than those who slept and woke at the same times every day.

Released:
19-Sep-2018 4:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 700858

Researchers Find Racial Disparities in Treatment for Heart Attack Patients

University of North Carolina Health Care System

A new study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association shows disparities between the care given to black and white patients seeking treatment for a type of heart attack called NSTEMI (Non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction).

Released:
20-Sep-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 700845

In cardiac injury, the NSAID carprofen causes dysfunction of the immune system

University of Alabama at Birmingham

Attention has focused on how NSAIDs may cause dysfunction of the immune system. Researchers now have found that sub-acute pretreatment with the NSAID carprofen before experimental heart attack in mice impaired resolution of acute inflammation following cardiac injury.

Released:
20-Sep-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 700795

Grad Student Wins AHA Fellowship to Study Diabetes’ Effects on the Heart

West Virginia University

Diabetics are at least twice as likely as nondiabetics to die of heart disease. They’re also at a greater risk of heart attack. With a two-year, $53,000 fellowship from the American Heart Association, Quincy Hathaway, a doctoral candidate in the West Virginia University School of Medicine, is examining how a certain protein, called PNPase, influences mitochondria’s performance in heart cells.

Released:
20-Sep-2018 8:30 AM EDT

Article ID: 700816

MyoKardia Launches Inaugural MyoSeeds™ Research Grants Program to Advance Independent Research in Heart Disease

MyoKardia

MyoKardia, a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company pioneering precision medicine for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, today announced the launch of the MyoSeeds™ Research Grants Program, a new initiative to support original, independent research in the biology and underlying mechanisms of cardiomyopathies and precision heart disease treatment with the goal of improving the lives of patients.

Released:
20-Sep-2018 8:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    20-Sep-2018 1:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 700807

Pioneering Genome Sequencing Study Links Rare Genetic Changes to Congenital Cardiac Condition

University Health Network (UHN)

In a remarkable new genetic discovery, researchers at the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, University Health Network (UHN), Ted Rogers Centre for Heart Research and The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) have found strong evidence that rare DNA variations can lead to Tetralogy of Fallot (ToF).

Released:
20-Sep-2018 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 700715

Distance Helps Re-fuel the Heart

Thomas Jefferson University

Separated entry and exit doors for calcium keep energy production smooth in the powerhouses of heart cells.

Released:
18-Sep-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 700624

Case Western Reserve School of Medicine Receives NIH Funding to Investigate New Imaging Approach for Peripheral Vascular Disease

Case Western Reserve University

Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine has received a three-year, $1,118,556 grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health to investigate a new imaging approach for diagnosing peripheral arterial disease, a common and potentially serious circulatory problem. More than 200 million people worldwide suffer from the condition.

Released:
17-Sep-2018 10:05 AM EDT

Showing results 5160 of 3363

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