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  • Embargo expired:
    22-Jan-2019 10:00 AM EST

Article ID: 706655

Men with Alcohol-related Cirrhosis are More Likely to Receive Alcohol Treatment than Women with the Disease

Research Society on Alcoholism

Alcohol-related cirrhosis of the liver is a serious and potentially life-threatening condition. Although patients with cirrhosis are routinely encouraged to stop drinking in order to reduce their mortality risk, many continue drinking and do not avail themselves of alcohol treatment. To understand more fully the role of alcohol treatment in determining the course of alcohol-related cirrhosis, researchers examined the rates, predictors, and outcomes of alcohol treatment in alcohol-related cirrhosis patients with private insurance. They obtained data from a large insurance database containing information on 66,053 patients with alcohol-related cirrhosis for the years 2009-2016. Nearly one-third of the patients were female, with a mean age of 54.5 years when the diagnosis of cirrhosis was made.

Released:
17-Jan-2019 11:05 AM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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  • Embargo expired:
    18-Jan-2019 11:00 AM EST

Article ID: 706620

New Study Shows Physician-Targeted Marketing is Associated with Increase in Opioid Overdose Deaths

NYU Langone Health

New research from NYU School of Medicine and Boston Medical Center published online January 18 in JAMA Network Open shows that increased marketing of opioid products to physicians -- from consulting fees to free meals -- is associated with higher opioid prescribing rates and elevated overdose deaths in the U.S.

Released:
16-Jan-2019 4:00 PM EST
  • Embargo expired:
    17-Jan-2019 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 706342

Brain’s Cerebellum Found to Influence Addictive and Social Behavior

Albert Einstein College of Medicine

In a study published online today in the journal Science, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, part of Montefiore, prove for the first time that the brain’s cerebellum—long thought to be mainly involved in coordinating movement—helps control the brain’s reward circuitry. The surprising finding indicates that the cerebellum plays a major role in reward processing and social behaviors and could potentially lead to new strategies for treating addiction.

Released:
13-Jan-2019 8:00 PM EST
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Article ID: 706646

Center for Collegiate Recovery Communities Hosts Ninth Annual Conference of Addiction, Recovery & Families

Texas Tech University

The two-day conference is intended to help participants increase their understanding of the psychological and physiological factors of addiction recovery and resources that can create positive outcomes.

Released:
17-Jan-2019 11:05 AM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 706524

Born to Run: Just Not on Cocaine

Florida Atlantic University

A study finds a surprising response to cocaine in a novel strain of mutant mice – they failed to show hyperactivity seen in normal mice when given cocaine and didn’t run around. In other tests, they still found cocaine appealing, but displayed an inability to shake the memory of cocaine’s actions when the drug was no longer administered. The key change that blocks cocaine’s stimulant effects in these mice is serotonin, not dopamine, which is responsible for producing a high.

Released:
16-Jan-2019 9:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 706493

Fraction of U.S. Outpatient Treatment Centers Offer Medication for Opioid Addiction

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Despite the mounting death toll of America’s opioid crisis, only a minority of facilities that treat substance use disorders offer patients buprenorphine, naltrexone or methadone—the three FDA-approved medications for the long-term management of opioid use disorder, according to a new study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Released:
15-Jan-2019 10:45 AM EST
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Article ID: 706400

Sexual Minorities More Likely to Suffer Severe Substance Use Disorders

University of Michigan

Researchers know that lesbian, gay and bisexual individuals are more likely than heterosexuals to use alcohol, tobacco or other drugs, but until now they didn't know to what degree.

Released:
14-Jan-2019 11:00 AM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 706397

Pain and substance abuse interact in a vicious cycle

Binghamton University, State University of New York

Pain and substance use interact in a vicious cycle that can ultimately worsen and maintain both chronic pain and addiction, according to a research team including faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Released:
14-Jan-2019 9:40 AM EST

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