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Newswise: DePaul University computer scientist earns NSF CAREER grant to study computational reproducibility

Article ID: 715019

DePaul University computer scientist earns NSF CAREER grant to study computational reproducibility

DePaul University

The National Science Foundation has awarded Tanu Malik at DePaul University a Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) grant to support her work to lay the foundation for establishing reproducibility of real-world computational and data science.

Released:
26-Jun-2019 3:50 PM EDT
Newswise: Newly defined cancer driver is Fast, Furious and Loud
  • Embargo expired:
    26-Jun-2019 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 714784

Newly defined cancer driver is Fast, Furious and Loud

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A new study from researchers at the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center finds that the gene FOXA1 overrides normal biology in three different ways to drive prostate cancer. They refer to the three classes as FAST, FURIOUS, and LOUD to reflect their unique features.

Released:
24-Jun-2019 9:15 AM EDT
Newswise: New Animal Study Adds to Evidence of Parkinson’s Disease Origins in the Gut
  • Embargo expired:
    26-Jun-2019 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 714560

New Animal Study Adds to Evidence of Parkinson’s Disease Origins in the Gut

Johns Hopkins Medicine

In experiments in mice, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have found additional evidence that Parkinson’s disease originates among cells in the gut and travels up the body’s neurons to the brain. The study, described in the June issue of the journal Neuron, offers a new, more accurate model in which to test treatments that could prevent or halt Parkinson’s disease progression.

Released:
19-Jun-2019 8:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 714980

A Snapshot in Time: Study Captures Fleeting Cell Differences That Can Alter Disease Risk

Johns Hopkins University

In cinema and science fiction, one small change in the past can have major, sometimes life-changing effects in the future. Using a series of snapshots, researchers recently captured such so-called “butterfly effects” in heart muscle cell development, and say this new view into the sequence of gene expression activity may lead to better understanding disease risk.

Released:
26-Jun-2019 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 714974

In Philadelphia’s Mental Health Clinics, Use of Evidence-based Therapies for Youth Psychiatric Treatment is Slow to Catch On, Despite Investments

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Penn Medicine researchers found that over a five-year period in Philadelphia, use of evidence-based therapies—practices backed by scientific data showing that symptoms improve in response to treatment, such as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT)—increased only modestly, despite the city and researchers’ substantial efforts to showcase the value of these approaches and to provide training to community clinicians.

Released:
26-Jun-2019 9:30 AM EDT
Newswise: From Simple Tools to High-Level Buy-In, How Doctors Can Help Cancer Patients Quit Tobacco

Article ID: 714943

From Simple Tools to High-Level Buy-In, How Doctors Can Help Cancer Patients Quit Tobacco

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

A simple set of decision-support tools combined with institutional buy-in can help increase the number of cancer patients who engage in treatment to help them quit tobacco, data from researchers in the Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania show.

Released:
26-Jun-2019 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 714904

Study Uses Supercomputers to Advance Dynamic Earthquake Rupture Models

University of California San Diego

Multi-fault earthquakes can span fault systems of tens to hundreds of kilometers, with ruptures propagating from one segment to another. During the last decade, seismologists have observed several cases of this complicated type of earthquake rupture, and are now relying on supercomputers to provide detailed models to better understand the fundamental physical processes that take place during these events, which can have far reaching effects.

Released:
25-Jun-2019 4:25 PM EDT
Newswise: 3D printed technology streamlines common medical test

Article ID: 714906

3D printed technology streamlines common medical test

National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Scientists have taken a common, yet laborious lab test and redesigned it to be performed in small 3D printed pipette tips used to measure and transfer fluids in the laboratory.

Released:
25-Jun-2019 12:05 PM EDT
Newswise: Video Games Offer Clues to Help Curb Animal Disease Outbreaks
  • Embargo expired:
    25-Jun-2019 10:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 714608

Video Games Offer Clues to Help Curb Animal Disease Outbreaks

University of Vermont

As Asia and Europe battle African swine fever outbreaks, UVM research shows how farmers’ risk attitudes affect the spread of infectious animal diseases. Getting just 10 percent of risk tolerant farmers to adopt biosecurity measures resulted in a significant reduction of disease.

Released:
19-Jun-2019 12:00 PM EDT
Newswise: ‘M-RISE’ Research Program Aims to Prevent Brain Damage Caused by Cardiac Arrest

Article ID: 714866

‘M-RISE’ Research Program Aims to Prevent Brain Damage Caused by Cardiac Arrest

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

American Heart Association funding will allow Michigan Medicine to establish a leading research and training program with a focus on preventing brain damage caused by out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

Released:
25-Jun-2019 8:40 AM EDT

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