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Newswise: Polymer Foam Expands Potential to Treat Aneurysms

Article ID: 610942

Polymer Foam Expands Potential to Treat Aneurysms

National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

NIBIB-funded researchers at Texas A&M are using the unique contraction and expansion properties of shape memory polymer foam to design a much improved treatment for brain aneurysms, which cause severe neurological damage or death for 30,000 Americans each year.

Released:
27-Nov-2013 11:00 AM EST
Newswise: Scientists Work to Engineer an Injectable Therapy for Rotator Cuff Injuries

Article ID: 610924

Scientists Work to Engineer an Injectable Therapy for Rotator Cuff Injuries

Georgia Institute of Technology

A research team at Georgia Tech is attempting to engineer an injectable therapy for the shoulder’s supraspinatus tendon, a rotator cuff tendon that is commonly torn in sports. When the tendon is damaged, the body makes things worse by activating enzymes that further break down the tendon. The scientists hope to develop an injectable compound that would deliver an inhibitor capable of blocking these enzymes, thereby reducing the severity of the injury or even healing the tissue.

Released:
27-Nov-2013 9:40 AM EST

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Article ID: 610840

Tulane-Led Katrina Study to Examine People, Plants – and Rats

Tulane University

More than eight years after Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans, a team of Tulane University ecologists, sociologists and geographers is joining forces with other national experts to better understand how rebuilding after a disaster can effect human and ecological well-being. The work will include one of the largest ecological studies of urban rats ever undertaken.

Released:
25-Nov-2013 5:00 PM EST
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Article ID: 610824

Childhood Exercise May Stave Off Some Bad Effects of Maternal Obesity, Animal Study Suggests

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Rats whose mothers were fed a high-fat diet during pregnancy and nursing were able to stave off some of the detrimental health effects of obesity by exercising during their adolescence, new Johns Hopkins research shows.

Released:
25-Nov-2013 1:10 PM EST
Newswise: Breaking the Brain Clock Predisposes Nerve Cells to Neurodegeneration
  • Embargo expired:
    25-Nov-2013 12:00 PM EST

Article ID: 610780

Breaking the Brain Clock Predisposes Nerve Cells to Neurodegeneration

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

As we age, our body rhythms lose time before they finally stop. Breaking the body clock by genetically disrupting a core clock gene, Bmal1, in mice has long been known to accelerate aging , causing arthritis, hair loss, cataracts, and premature death. New research now reveals that the nerve cells of these mice with broken clocks show signs of deterioration before the externally visible signs of aging are apparent, raising the possibility of novel approaches to staving off or delaying neurodegeneration.

Released:
22-Nov-2013 4:30 PM EST
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Article ID: 610783

Epigenetic Changes May Explain Chronic Kidney Disease

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Researchers found, in a genome-wide survey, significant differences in the pattern of chemical modifications on DNA that affect gene expression in kidney cells from patients with chronic kidney disease versus healthy controls. This is the first study to show that changes in these modifications – the cornerstone of the field of epigenetics – might explain chronic kidney disease.

Released:
22-Nov-2013 4:50 PM EST
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Article ID: 610782

Paths Not Taken: Notch Signaling Pathway Keeps Immature T Cells on the Right Track

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

One protein called Notch, which has well-known roles in the development of multiple tissues, plays an essential role in triggering T-cell development. Notch signaling induces expression of genes that promote the maturation of T cells and discourage alternative cell fates. Deficiency of the Notch target gene Hes1 in blood stem cells results in extremely low T-cell numbers, and could shed light on how normal cells are transformed in the context of cancer.

Released:
22-Nov-2013 4:45 PM EST
Newswise: Study Finds Link Between Allergies and Increased Risk of Blood Cancers in Women

Article ID: 610775

Study Finds Link Between Allergies and Increased Risk of Blood Cancers in Women

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

A team of scientists looking into the interplay of the immune system and cancer have found a link between a history of airborne allergies – in particular to plants, grass and trees – with risk of blood cancers in women.

Released:
22-Nov-2013 3:00 PM EST
Newswise: Sticky Business: Magnetic Pollen Replicas Offer Multimodal Adhesion

Article ID: 610725

Sticky Business: Magnetic Pollen Replicas Offer Multimodal Adhesion

Georgia Institute of Technology

Researchers have created magnetic replicas of sunflower pollen grains using a wet chemical, layer-by-layer process that applies highly conformal iron oxide coatings. The replicas possess natural adhesion properties from the pollen while gaining magnetic behavior.

Released:
21-Nov-2013 4:00 PM EST
Newswise: Two Human Proteins Found To Affect How “Jumping Gene” Gets Around
  • Embargo expired:
    21-Nov-2013 12:00 PM EST

Article ID: 610663

Two Human Proteins Found To Affect How “Jumping Gene” Gets Around

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Using a new method to catch elusive “jumping genes” in the act, researchers have found two human proteins that are used by one type of DNA to replicate itself and move from place to place. The discovery breaks new ground in understanding the arms race between a jumping gene driven to colonize new areas of the human genome and cells working to limit the risk posed by such volatile bits of DNA.

Released:
20-Nov-2013 2:00 PM EST

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