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Showing results 6170 of 3990
  • Embargo expired:
    1-Oct-2018 10:45 AM EDT

Article ID: 701288

Drug Cocktail May Treat Postmenopausal PCOS Complications

American Physiological Society (APS)

A combination of a diabetes drug and a high blood pressure medication may effectively treat all symptoms of postmenopausal polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The findings will be presented today at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Diseases: Sex-Specific Implications for Physiology conference in Knoxville, Tenn.

Released:
28-Sep-2018 1:10 PM EDT

Article ID: 701358

High Water Bills Can Unintentionally Harm Disadvantaged Tenants

Johns Hopkins University

Landlords in disadvantaged communities can be so unsettled by increasing water bills and nuisance fees that they take it out on their tenants, threatening the housing security of those who need it most.

Released:
1-Oct-2018 10:05 AM EDT

Law and Public Policy

JasonChanClass1.jpg

Article ID: 701362

Asking questions, testing improves student learning of new material

Iowa State University

Iowa State researchers know memory retrieval is beneficial for learning, but their new meta-analysis found there are limits. The research shows the frequency and difficulty of questions can reverse the effect and be detrimental to learning.

Released:
1-Oct-2018 10:05 AM EDT

Education

Article ID: 701309

The Cart Before the Horse: A New Model of Cause and Effect

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

In a recent paper in Nature Communications, scientists led by Albert C. Yang, MD, PhD, of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, introduce a new approach to causality that moves away from this temporally linear model of cause and effect.

Released:
28-Sep-2018 12:05 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 701263

"They have been seared into my memory." Research by Rutgers psychologist Tracey Shors addresses Christine Blasey Ford's testimony detailing alleged sexual assault by Brett Kavanaugh

Rutgers University

Christine Blasey Ford told the Senate Judiciary Committee today that she "will never forget" the key details of her alleged assault by Brett Kavanaugh, because "they have been seared into my memory."

Released:
27-Sep-2018 2:05 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 701253

Pitt Innovation Challenge Awards $475K to Spur Innovation Around Human Performance

Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

A total of $475K in prizes was awarded to teams of budding entrepreneurs with the best ideas around improving human performance.

Released:
27-Sep-2018 1:00 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 701215

School of Social Work receives federal funding to address opioid addiction in Appalachia

West Virginia University - Eberly College of Arts and Sciences

Social workers at West Virginia University are leading the way in opioid treatment and prevention in West Virginia, where overdose rates are the highest in the U.S.

Released:
27-Sep-2018 9:05 AM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 701205

Silver Fox Study Reveals Genetic Clues to Social Behavior

Cornell University

Now, after more than 50 generations of selective breeding, a new Cornell University-led study compares gene expression of tame and aggressive silver foxes in two areas of the brain, shedding light on genes responsible for social behavior.

Released:
27-Sep-2018 6:05 AM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    27-Sep-2018 4:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 700827

People Can Die From Giving Up the Fight

University of Portsmouth

People can die simply because they’ve given up, life has beaten them and they feel defeat is inescapable, according to new research.

Released:
25-Sep-2018 4:00 AM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    26-Sep-2018 4:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 700975

Childhood Poverty May Have Lasting Effects on Cognitive Skills in Old Age

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Children who grow up in poverty or who are otherwise socially and economically disadvantaged may be more likely in old age to score lower than others on tests of cognitive skills, according to a study published in the September 26, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Released:
24-Sep-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences


Showing results 6170 of 3990

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