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Article ID: 701746

Sports Medicine Licensure Clarity Act Signed into Law

American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM)

AMSSM is pleased to announce the Sports Medicine Licensure Clarity Act was signed into law Friday, Oct. 5, by President Donald Trump. The bill represents a bipartisan solution that protects team physicians, athletic trainers and other sports medicine professionals when they travel across state lines with their teams to treat the athletes under their care.

Released:
5-Oct-2018 3:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 701734

Loyola to Offer Residency Program in Emergency Medicine

Loyola University Health System

Loyola University Medical Center, which treats some of the Chicago area's most critically ill and injured patients, is establishing a residency program to train new doctors in emergency medicine.

Released:
5-Oct-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 701415

Could Treating Psoriasis in the Future Be as Easy as Going Online?

Keck Medicine of USC

New research from the Keck School of Medicine of USC finds that an online care delivery model is equivalent to in-person care for improving psoriasis symptoms.

Released:
5-Oct-2018 11:00 AM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    5-Oct-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 701634

Health Insurer Policies May Discourage Use of Non-Opioid Alternatives for Lower Back Pain

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public and private health insurance policies in the U.S. are missing important opportunities to encourage the use of physical therapy, psychological counseling and other non-drug alternatives to opioid medication for treating lower back pain, a study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has found.

Released:
4-Oct-2018 10:05 AM EDT

Article ID: 701688

WashU Expert: Trump’s New NAFTA Won’t Lower Domestic Drug Prices

Washington University in St. Louis

President Donald Trump has touted his new United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) as a way to boost the American economy. It may not, however, have any impact on one of his other campaign promises: reducing prescription costs for U.S. consumers, says a drug pricing expert at Washington University in St. Louis.Buried in the draft of the new pact is a provision that would give pharmaceutical companies a minimum of 10 years to exclusively market biologic drugs, a set of complex medications made from living cells.

Released:
4-Oct-2018 3:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 701219

Scientists Call for Microbial “Noah’s Ark” to Protect Global Health

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

A Rutgers University–New Brunswick-led team of researchers is calling for the creation of a global microbiota vault to protect the long-term health of humanity. Such a Noah’s Ark of beneficial germs would be gathered from human populations whose microbiomes are uncompromised by antibiotics, processed diets and other ill effects of modern society, which have contributed to a massive loss of microbial diversity and an accompanying rise in health problems. The human microbiome includes the trillions of microscopic organisms that live in and on our bodies, contributing to our health in a myriad of ways.

Released:
4-Oct-2018 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 701642

Evidence Mounts Linking Aspirin to Lower Risk of Ovarian Cancer

Moffitt Cancer Center

A new study found that women who reported taking a low-dose aspirin every day had a 23 percent lower risk of ovarian cancer compared to nonaspirin users. The research also found that women who were heavy users of nonaspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen (Advil) or naproxen (Aleve), over a long period of time had a higher risk of developing ovarian cancer.

Released:
4-Oct-2018 11:15 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    4-Oct-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 701553

Analysis Reveals Genomic Effects of a New Cancer Treatment Now in Clinical Trials

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

A twist on the molecular mechanism of how a new cancer drug works could aid in better identifying the best treatments for patients for an array of cancers. The team identified over 500 sites in DNA that require an enzyme called ATR checkpoint kinase to not break when they are replicated.

Released:
3-Oct-2018 12:05 PM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    4-Oct-2018 7:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 701595

MD Anderson and Cyclacel Pharmaceuticals Announce Strategic Alliance to Study Novel Cyclacel Medicines in Hematological Malignancies

University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and Cyclacel Pharmaceuticals, Inc., today announced a three-year strategic alliance agreement that will enable clinical evaluation for safety and efficacy of three Cyclacel medicines in patients with hematological malignancies, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and other advanced leukemias.

Released:
3-Oct-2018 3:50 PM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    3-Oct-2018 5:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 701543

Kidney Care Conflicts of Interest: Penn Medicine Experts Call for Transparency on Joint-Venture Dialysis Clinics

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Penn Medicine experts in nephrology and health policy call for more transparency about joint-venture ownership of dialysis clinics to better understand what impact these arrangements may have on patient referrals and clinical outcomes. The lack of transparency poses a major barrier for evidence-based health care policy research and deprives patients of critical information, the researchers write in a new Perspective published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Released:
3-Oct-2018 11:00 AM EDT

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