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Article ID: 700839

Remoção do ovário pode aumentar risco de doença renal crônica

Mayo Clinic

Mulheres na pré-menopausa que passaram por uma cirurgia para remoção do ovário enfrentam um maior risco de desenvolver a doença renal crônica, segundo o estudo da Mayo Clinic publicado no Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Released:
20-Sep-2018 11:05 AM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    20-Sep-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 700497

Gambling Monkeys Help Scientists Find Brain Area Linked to High-Risk Behavior

Johns Hopkins University

Monkeys who learned how to gamble have helped researchers pinpoint an area of the brain key to one’s willingness to make risky decisions.

Released:
13-Sep-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    20-Sep-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 700558

Scientists Grow Human Esophagus in Lab

Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Scientists working to bioengineer the entire human gastrointestinal system in a laboratory now report using pluripotent stem cells to grow human esophageal organoids. The newly published research in the journal Cell Stem Cell is the first time scientists have been able to grow human esophageal tissue entirely from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), which can form any tissue type in the body.

Released:
17-Sep-2018 6:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    20-Sep-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 700567

Novel Biomarker Found in Ovarian Cancer Patients Can Predict Response to Therapy

University of Chicago Medical Center

Researchers have identified an independent prognostic factor, cancer/testis antigen 45, that is associated with extended disease-free survival for women with advanced ovarian cancer. Patients with high levels of CT45 in their tumors lived more than seven times as long as patients who lacked sufficient CT45.

Released:
14-Sep-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    20-Sep-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 700693

Octopuses Given Mood Drug ‘Ecstasy’ Reveal Genetic Link to Evolution of Social Behaviors in Humans

Johns Hopkins Medicine

By studying the genome of a kind of octopus not known for its friendliness toward its peers, then testing its behavioral reaction to a popular mood-altering drug called MDMA or “ecstasy,” scientists say they have found preliminary evidence of an evolutionary link between the social behaviors of the sea creature and humans, species separated by 500 million years on the evolutionary tree.

Released:
18-Sep-2018 10:00 AM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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  • Embargo expired:
    20-Sep-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 700712

What Can Salad Dressing Tell Us About Cancer? Think Oil and Vinegar

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital scientists have identified another way the process that causes oil to form droplets in water may contribute to solid tumors, such as prostate and breast cancer. The findings appear today in the journal Molecular Cell. Researchers found evidence that mutations in the tumor suppressor gene SPOP contribute to cancer by disrupting a process called liquid-liquid phase separation. Liquid-liquid phase separation is seen often in nature and is the reason why oil and vinegar separate in salad dressing.

Released:
18-Sep-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 700822

ACI Responds to "Sensational" Study Claims on Cleaners, Disinfectants

American Cleaning Institute

A study and related analysis claiming cleaners and disinfectants contribute to children’s risk of being overweight are “sensational” and “don’t really hold up,” according to the American Cleaning Institute.​

Released:
20-Sep-2018 10:05 AM EDT

Article ID: 700820

New Research Finds Annual Well Visit Increases Likelihood of Preventive Services

Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute

A new Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute study assesses the effect of receiving an Annual Wellness Visit (AWV) between 2011 and 2013 on the annual rate of eight preventive services recommended for the Medicare population following the AWV. The study is published online in Preventive Medicine.

Released:
20-Sep-2018 10:05 AM EDT

Article ID: 700818

Study: Widely Used Nonprofit Efficiency Tool Doesn’t Work

North Carolina State University

A recent study finds that the tool most often used to assess the efficiency of nonprofit organizations isn’t just inaccurate – it can actually be negatively correlated with efficiency.

Released:
20-Sep-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 700811

Study at Johns Hopkins Hospital Leads To Changes in Reporting Patient Safety Concerns

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Study at Johns Hopkins Hospital Leads To Changes in Reporting Patient Safety Concerns 09/20/2018 AddThis Sharing Buttons Share to FacebookShare to TwitterShare to EmailShare to PrintShare to More Credit: iStock In a case study published online last week in Academic Medicine, an international team of researchers led by the University of Cambridge and Johns Hopkins Medicine looked at what prevented employees from raising concerns.

Released:
20-Sep-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Showing results 6170 of 33420

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