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Article ID: 715256

The new racial disparity in special education

Michigan State University

New research revealed that black and Hispanic students are put into special education more often in white schools. But, they are much less likely to be identified as needing special education in schools that are mostly minority, where they are surrounded by students of the same race.

Released:
2-Jul-2019 11:05 AM EDT

Education

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Article ID: 715255

Infants 10 to 16 months old prefer those who yield in conflicts, UCI study finds

University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., July 2, 2019 – Social status matters, even to infants between 10 and 16 months old, according to a new study by two University of California, Irvine cognitive scientists. Published online in Current Biology, the research found that in staged confrontations between two puppets, babies preferred the one who deferred.

Released:
2-Jul-2019 11:05 AM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 715248

Study: Brain injury common in domestic violence

Ohio State University

Domestic violence survivors commonly suffer repeated blows to the head and strangulation, trauma that has lasting effects that should be widely recognized by advocates, health care providers, law enforcement and others who are in a position to help, according to the authors of a new study.

Released:
2-Jul-2019 10:05 AM EDT

Article ID: 715200

What makes a good excuse work? A Cambridge philosopher may have the answer

University of Cambridge

We've all done it, offered an excuse for our poor behaviour or rude reactions to others in the heat of the moment

Released:
1-Jul-2019 12:05 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Newswise: Tulane researcher to study trauma intervention in mothers and children

Article ID: 715192

Tulane researcher to study trauma intervention in mothers and children

Tulane University

The study will be led by assistant professor of psychology Sarah Gray, who also serves as director of the Tulane Child and Family Lab.

Released:
1-Jul-2019 11:05 AM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Newswise: Helping Pediatric Cancer Survivors Address Mental Health Challenges

Article ID: 715005

Helping Pediatric Cancer Survivors Address Mental Health Challenges

Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

Anxiety and depression related to childhood cancer survivorship can be challenging for this population. Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey recently educated pediatric cancer survivors about these topics through its Long-term, Information, Treatment Effects and Evaluation Program annual Survivor’s Family Education Night.

Released:
1-Jul-2019 8:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 715122

Opposition to Muslim Ban Continues, Thanks to American Values

University of Delaware

A new study found movements that promote American inclusiveness can have a lasting impact on policies that target racial, ethnic or religious minority groups, such as Trump’s "Muslim ban." The study suggests policy attitudes related to stigmatized groups are more malleable than previously assumed.

Released:
28-Jun-2019 1:30 PM EDT

Law and Public Policy

Newswise: Saving Lives

Article ID: 715125

Saving Lives

University of Utah Health

In the face of escalating teen suicides, Utah launched an app. No one knew just how much change it would bring.

Released:
28-Jun-2019 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 715072

How Does 'Supportive Touch' Reduce Pain? Study Reveals Changes in Brain Activity

Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

Holding hands with a romantic partner – a form of "supportive touch" – reduces pain-specific signal in the brain of women during a painful procedure, reports an experimental study in PAIN®, the official publication of the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Released:
27-Jun-2019 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 715071

LGBTQ Asian Americans seen as more 'American'

University of Washington

For Asian Americans who are gay or lesbian, their sexual orientation may make them seem more “American” than those who are presumed straight. A new University of Washington study, the latest in research to examine stereotypes, identity and ideas about who is “American,” focuses on how sexual orientation and race come together to influence others’ perceptions.

Released:
27-Jun-2019 12:05 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences


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