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Showing results 6170 of 6397
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  • Embargo expired:
    24-Jan-2019 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 706710

Zika vaccines should induce responses by CD4+ T cells

PLOS

Immune cells called CD4+ T cells could be important mediators of protection against the Zika virus, according to a study published January 24 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Sujan Shresta of the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, and colleagues. The findings support vaccine strategies that induce a protective CD4+ T cell response to the Zika virus.

Released:
17-Jan-2019 4:35 PM EST
  • Embargo expired:
    24-Jan-2019 1:00 PM EST

Article ID: 706763

Sci-Fi to Reality: Superpowered Salamander May Hold the Key to Human Regeneration

University of Kentucky

Scientists at the Unviersity of Kentucky have assembled the entire genome of the Mexican Axolotl, the key to unlocking the secrets of regeneration with potential for life-changing clinical applications down the road.

Released:
18-Jan-2019 4:00 PM EST
  • Embargo expired:
    24-Jan-2019 1:00 PM EST

Article ID: 706912

Scientists Assemble Genome of Salamander with Regeneration Capabilities

University of Kentucky

Scientists at the University of Kentucky have assembled the entire genome of the Mexican Axolotl, the key to unlocking the secrets of regeneration with potential for life-changing clinical applications down the road.

Released:
23-Jan-2019 9:50 AM EST
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Article ID: 707023

Enzyme that breaks down amino acids may promote aging

Kobe University

Permanently arrested cell growth is known as "cellular senescence", and the accumulation of senescent cells may be one cause of aging in our bodies. Japanese researchers have discovered that a certain enzyme in our bodies promotes cellular senescence by producing reactive oxygen species. Drugs that target this enzyme could potentially suppress this process, and inhibit aging and aging-related illnesses.

Released:
24-Jan-2019 12:15 PM EST
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Article ID: 703892

Announcing the 2018 SLAS Technology Ten: Translating Life Sciences Innovation

SLAS (Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening)

The SLAS Technology Ten annually showcases ten individual articles that stand out as the most innovative scientific achievements published in SLAS Technology in the past 12 months.

Released:
24-Jan-2019 10:05 AM EST
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Article ID: 706978

New findings may help oncologists determine effectiveness of checkpoint inhibitors

University of Alabama at Birmingham

In an article recently published in JCI Insight, researchers from the University of Alabama at Birmingham and Vanderbilt University have identified checkpoint inhibitor resistance mechanisms in many solid tumor cancers, including melanoma, lung cancer and breast cancer.

Released:
23-Jan-2019 5:30 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    23-Jan-2019 1:00 PM EST

Article ID: 706811

UC San Diego Researchers First to Use CRISPR/Cas9 to Control Genetic Inheritance in Mice

University of California San Diego

Using active genetics technology, UC San Diego biologists have developed the world’s first CRISPR/Cas9-based approach to control genetic inheritance in a mammal. The achievement in mice lays the groundwork for further advances based on this technology, including biomedical research on human disease.

Released:
21-Jan-2019 1:00 PM EST
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Article ID: 706903

Los Alamos scientist Bette Korber to discuss her work developing an HIV vaccine

Los Alamos National Laboratory

Los Alamos National Laboratory Fellow Bette Korber will discuss her work designing a vaccine against HIV (the virus that causes AIDS) in three Frontiers in Science public lectures beginning Jan. 31 in Los Alamos.

Released:
22-Jan-2019 5:05 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    22-Jan-2019 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 706476

Heart disease risk begins in the womb

PLOS

Heart disease is the greatest killer in the world today, and it is widely accepted that our genes interact with traditional lifestyle risk factors, such as smoking, obesity and/or a sedentary life to promote an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. However, a new study in sheep, publishing January 22 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, by a team from Cambridge University, finds that offspring whose mothers had a complicated pregnancy may be at greater risk of heart disease in later life, suggesting that our cards may be marked even before we are born.

Released:
15-Jan-2019 8:05 AM EST
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Article ID: 706825

Test for Esophageal Cancer Could Save Millions of Lives

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Cancer of the esophagus claims more than 400,000 lives around the world each year. With no efficient, reliable method of screening for the disease, by the time symptoms become apparent, it's often too late to save the patient.

Released:
22-Jan-2019 11:00 AM EST

Showing results 6170 of 6397

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