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Showing results 731740 of 798

Article ID: 586125

Book Describes Six Views on Human Sexuality

Dick Jones Communications

There are six "lenses" through which people view sexuality in our pluralistic society. Thus there are few shared understandings or "rules of engagement." This leads to pain and disappointment for many people.

Released:
23-Feb-2012 9:00 AM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 585978

Passion Pitfall: Research Finds That Rekindling a Romance Often Extinguishes a Couple's Happiness

Kansas State University

A study on couples who broke up and then got back together revealed that the couple had a lower level of happiness and self-esteem; were less satisfied with their partner and the relationship; had worse communication; and were more uncertain about their future together.

Released:
20-Feb-2012 11:10 AM EST

Arts and Humanities

Article ID: 585757

Is Flirting Ethical? Philosophy Prof Explores the Possibilities

Gettysburg College

Love is in the air on Valentine's Day, and Gettysburg College philosophy professor Steve Gimbel is offering some ethical and practical advice on flirting to those of the faint of heart.

Released:
14-Feb-2012 8:00 AM EST

Arts and Humanities

Article ID: 585746

Lovelorn Liars Leave Linguistic Leads

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Online daters intent on fudging their personal information have a big advantage: most people are terrible at identifying a liar. But new research is turning the tables on deceivers using their own words.

Released:
13-Feb-2012 2:00 PM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 585738

Love, Chocolate Good for the Heart, Says Vanderbilt Cardiologist

Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Being involved in a healthy, loving relationship is good for the heart, says Vanderbilt Heart and Vascular Institute cardiologist Julie Damp, M.D. “There are a couple of different theories behind why that might be,” Damp said. People who are married or who are in close, healthy relationships tend to be less likely to smoke, are more physically active and are more likely to have a well-developed social structure, she said. They are also more likely to have lower levels of stress and anxiety in their day-to-day lives.

Released:
13-Feb-2012 1:00 PM EST

Article ID: 585629

In the Zone: With Conversations, Research Finds Young Couples Experience Less Relationship Stress, Higher Satisfaction

Kansas State University

Young adults who easily engage in rewarding conversations with their partners are less likely to hold onto anger and stress and more likely to be satisfied with the relationship, according to research from Kansas State University. Researchers are also looking at factors that relate to positive dating relationships or problematic relationships.

Released:
9-Feb-2012 12:20 PM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • Embargo expired:
    9-Feb-2012 12:15 AM EST

Article ID: 585597

Fruit Fly Turn-On: A Sexy, Youthful Smell May Make Up for Advancing Age

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Beauty is more than skin deep, at least for fruit flies studied in new research that demonstrates how age-related changes in pheromone production can reduce sexual attractiveness.

Released:
8-Feb-2012 2:25 PM EST

Article ID: 585591

Some Formerly Cohabiting Couples With Children Keep Romantic Relationship

Ohio State University

When low-income cohabiting couples with children decide to no longer live together, that doesn’t necessarily mean the end of their romantic relationship, a new study suggests.

Released:
8-Feb-2012 2:15 PM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 585187

College Reduces Odds for Marriage Among Disadvantaged

Cornell University

For those with few social advantages, college is a prime pathway to financial stability, but it also unexpectedly lowers their odds of ever marrying, according to a study by Cornell University sociologist Kelly Musick being published in the February issue of the Journal of Marriage and Family.

Released:
31-Jan-2012 7:00 AM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 585026

Cohabitating Valentines Are Happier Than Wedded Couples

Cornell University

When it comes to the well-being of married versus cohabitating Valentines, wedded couples experience few advantages in psychological well-being and social ties, according to a new study at Cornell University.

Released:
24-Jan-2012 5:00 PM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences


Showing results 731740 of 798

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