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Article ID: 623672

Does Size Matter? MRI Measures of Joint's Geometry Suggest Role in Athletes' Severe Knee Injuries

University of Vermont

With only 200-300,000 per year, ACL injuries are far less common than ankle ligament injuries, which number more than two million annually. But ACL injuries can end sports careers and are proven to lead to the early onset of osteoarthritis, putting young athletes on track for joint replacement as early as their 30s. Vermont research provides insight into the potential role of the knee's geometric characteristics in increasing injury risk.

Released:
23-Sep-2014 4:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 623537

Narrow Focus on Physical Activity Could Be Ruining Kids’ Playtime

Universite de Montreal

"By focusing on the physical activity aspect of play, authorities put aside several aspects of play that are beneficial to young people's emotional and social health," Professor Katherine Frohlich, University of Montreal

Released:
22-Sep-2014 6:00 AM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    16-Sep-2014 4:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 623219

Waistlines of U.S. Adults Continue to Increase

JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association

The prevalence of abdominal obesity and average waist circumference increased among U.S. adults from 1999 to 2012, according to a study in the September 17 issue of JAMA.

Released:
12-Sep-2014 12:00 PM EDT
Brownson.jpg

Article ID: 623299

National Study Examines Ways Federal Policy Can Impact Childhood, Adolescent Obesity

Washington University in St. Louis

A tax on sugar-sweetened beverages such as sodas, energy drinks, sweet teas and sports drinks could reduce obesity in adolescents, and exercise promotion, such as after-school physical activity programs, could impact younger children in the fight against fat. That’s the findings of a new national study co-authored by Ross Brownson, PhD, professor at the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis.

Released:
15-Sep-2014 4:00 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 623212

This Is Your Brain on Snacks—Brain Stimulation Affects Craving and Consumption

Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

Magnetic stimulation of a brain area involved in "executive function" affects cravings for and consumption of calorie-dense snack foods, reports a study in the September issue of Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine, the official journal of the American Psychosomatic Society. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

Released:
15-Sep-2014 10:50 AM EDT

Article ID: 623040

Few Overweight People with Diabetes Getting Recommended Physical Activity

Health Behavior News Service

Women and men with diabetes who are trying to lose weight are not meeting the recommended amounts of physical activity for weight loss, finds a new study in the American Journal of Health Promotion.

Released:
9-Sep-2014 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 622761

NIH Grant Funds High-Intensity Functional Training in Army Personnel Study

Kansas State University

A more than $2.52 million grant from the National Institutes of Health's National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases to test the effects of high-intensity functional training compared to usual Army physical readiness training on changes in body composition, health and fitness among active duty military personnel.

Released:
3-Sep-2014 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 622711

Drinking Too Much Water Can be Fatal to Athletes

Loyola University Health System

The recent deaths of two high school football players illustrate the dangers of drinking too much water. Exercise-associated hyponatremia can cause muscle cramps, vomiting, seizures and unconsciousness.

Released:
2-Sep-2014 12:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 622697

Yoga Relieves Multiple Sclerosis Symptoms

Rutgers University

A new Rutgers study indicates that a specialized yoga program is beneficial to everyday living for those with multiple sclerosis. After an eight-week trial, the Rutgers School of Health Related Professions found that participants had better balance, fine motor coordination, an improved quality of life and a decrease in pain and fatigue.

Released:
2-Sep-2014 10:00 AM EDT

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