Newswise — The fundamental need for water of quality and quantity becomes increasingly difficult to fulfill as populations grow, human land use expands, and water patterns shift due to climate change.

The problem facing policymakers is compounded by the fact that human, animal, and environmental health must be considered in making water policy -- but each are measured by different standards. Data to adequately inform policy is often hard to come by, and putting one use of water above and out of balance with all the other uses, has already led to unintended and undesirable consequences.

This topic will be explored at the second international conference, iCOMOS (International Conference on One Medicine One Science) that will take place April 24-27 at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis. iCOMOS provides a global forum to discuss the emerging One Health initiative, which recognizes that human, animal and ecosystem health are all linked. In fact, it’s estimated that 75 percent of infectious diseases originate with animals. One Health promotes, improves, and defends the health and well-being of all species through increased collaborations between physicians, veterinarians and other scientific health and environmental professionals.

iCOMOS includes presenters and participants in human health, veterinary medicine, public health, food policy, food production and food safety, infectious diseases, environmental health, and agriculture. Speakers and participants from more than 30 countries will participate.

To meet the needs in water quality and quantity for humans, animals, and the environment different standards are used – and a delicate balance is required. What are the consequences for achieving desirable health and economic consequences in water management and policy?

Featured speakers for this session include:

Ajay Markanday, Director FAO Liaison Office, North America, will discuss water as a threat to achieving global food and national securityLevent Bat, Sinop University, Turkey, presents the environmental pollution impacts on fish and humansPhysician and clinical pharmacologist Marie-Louise Ovesjö, discusses pharmaceutical waste in water and her work in Sweden on reduction of emissionsVeterinarian and conservationist Margaret Driciru, on the influence of a natural water flow system in the epidemiology of anthrax at Uganda’s Queen Elizabeth National ParkDeborah Swackhamer, University of Minnesota environmental health scientist, will speak on the role of science in water management policy development

In addition,explorer Ann Bancroft, will speak about water issues regarding her recent trip to India's Ganges River

To learn more about the topics and speakers at this international event, visit: http://cceevents.umn.edu/icomos. Speakers may be available for interviews.

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Newswise: Environmental, Human and Animal Water Needs:Finding the Balance

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Newswise: Environmental, Human and Animal Water Needs:Finding the Balance

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Newswise: Environmental, Human and Animal Water Needs:Finding the Balance

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Caption: Explorer Ann Bancroft

Newswise: Environmental, Human and Animal Water Needs:Finding the Balance

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