Experts from Columbia University Medical Center/NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital Present at the Alzheimer's Association's 2009 ICAD

Article ID: 554173

Released: 13-Jul-2009 9:00 AM EDT

Source Newsroom: Columbia University Irving Medical Center

Newswise — Experts from Columbia University Medical Center/NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital Present at the Alzheimer's Association's 2009 International Conference on Alzheimer's Disease (ICAD)

The following embargoed research from Columbia University Medical Center/NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital is being presented at the Alzheimer's Association's 2009 International Conference on Alzheimer's Disease (ICAD) in Vienna, Austria.

EMBARGO NOTE: The embargo for all abstracts to be presented at ICAD is in effect until the date and time of the presentation unless otherwise noted on the abstract and/or press release. If there are additional questions on the embargo, please contact the ICAD public relations team.

Exercise and Longevity in Alzheimer's disease (AD)

Authors: Nikolaos Scarmeas, Jose A. Luchsinger, Stephanie Cosentino, Adam M. Brickman, Nicole Schupf, Yaakov Stern

Session Info: O1-02-05 (oral presentation)

Presentation Time: Sunday, July 12, 4 -5:15 p.m. (CEST)

Background/Significance: The objective of the study was to determine if exercise can prolong survival in patients with AD. Previous research has demonstrated that physical activity may protect against the development of AD and may prolong longevity in the general population. However, it was not known whether it can prolong survival in patients who have already developed AD. Results of this prospective study found that exercise may not only affect AD risk but also its prognosis. Compared with AD patients who did not exercise at all, those who were physically active had 55-59% lower mortality.

A Dietary Pattern Protective Against Alzheimer's Disease

Authors: Yian Gu, Jeri W. Nieves, Yaakov Stern, Jose Luchsinger, Nikolaos Scarmeas.

Session Info: P2-068 (poster presentation)

Presentation Time: Monday, July 13, 12:30 " 3 p.m. (CEST)

Background/Significance: The investigators sought to identify a dietary pattern that is associated with AD risk and concluded that high intake of certain vegetables, fish, nuts and salad dressing, and low intake of high-fat dairy products seem to be protective regarding development of AD.

Hyperinsulinemia, Defined as Low Adiponectin or Type 2 Diabetes in the Elderly, is Related with Higher Late Onset Alzheimer's Disease Risk

Authors: Jose A. Luchsinger, James M. Noble, Ming X. Tang, Richard Mayeux

Session Info: P3-143 (poster presentation)

Presentation Time: Tuesday, July 14, 12:30 " 3 p.m. (CEST)

Background/Significance: The researchers sought to determine whether hyperinsulinemia (defined as low levels of adiponectin, a protein that is produced by fat cells and that has anti-inflammatory and insulin-sensitizing properties) or a history of type 2 diabetes, was related to higher risk of late-onset AD (LOAD) and concluded that there is a strong association. The team reports that these results provide further support for the development of therapies targeting hyperinsulinemia to prevent and treat LOAD, and proposes the use of low adiponectin or a history of type 2 diabetes as markers of hyperinsulinemia in the elderly.

Dr. Luchsinger will speak at ICAD's featured symposium, Type 2 Diabetes and the Brain: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease Prevention on Tuesday, July 14, 10:30 a.m. " 12:30 p.m. (CEST) (F3-01)

The Sortilin-related Receptor (SORL1) Influences Variation in Memory in Late-onset Alzheimer's Disease

Authors: Christiane Reitz, Joseph H. Lee, Rong Cheng, Ekaterina Rogaeva, Shinya Tokuhiro, Lorraine Clark, Peter St George-Hyslop, Richard Mayeux

Session Info: P4-112 (poster presentation)

Presentation Time: Wednesday, July 15, 12:30 " 3 p.m. (CEST)

Background/Significance: Dr. Richard Mayeux co-led an international team that in January 2007 published findings that the gene SORL1 is implicated in late-onset AD. As a follow-up, the team explored whether variation in SORL1 is associated with memory performance using two independent datasets. The researchers found that genetic variation in SORL1 is specifically associated with memory function.

Analysis of Memory in an Aging Population: Interaction of Hippocampal Structure and Function

Authors: Christiane Reitz, Adam M. Brickman, Truman R. Brown, Jennifer Manly, Charlie DeCarli, Scott A. Small, Richard Mayeux

Session Info: P3-085 (poster presentation)

Presentation Time: Tuesday, July 14, 12:30 " 3 p.m. (CEST)

Background/Significance: The study was designed to test the hypothesis that in AD cellular dysfunction, measured by blood flow, precedes cell death, which is measured by atrophy. Their analyses revealed that tissue loss, characterized by hippocampal atrophy and cell dysfunction typified by changes in entorhinal cortex-cerebral blood volume (EC-CBV), interact in their effect on memory. Metabolic rather than structural changes contribute to memory dysfunction early, while in later stages of disease both structural and functional effects play a role.

(This topic will also be covered in a poster with the Imaging Consortium posters on Saturday, July 11, 12 " 2 p.m. (CEST)

Relation of C-Reactive Protein to Cognitive Impairment

Authors: Jennifer J. Manly, Nicole Schupf, Ming X. Tang, Richard Mayeux, Jose A. Luchsinger

Poster Presentation

Session Info: P2-119 (poster presentation)

Presentation Time: Monday, July 13, 12:30 " 3 p.m. (CEST)

Background/Significance: The study was designed to test the hypothesis that high sensitivity

C-reactive protein (CRP) is a biomarker for cognitive impairment. The researchers found that high sensitivity CRP predicted memory and visuospatial cognitive impairment in the elderly but that further exploration of the relationship between inflammation and cognition is warranted.


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