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Article ID: 697540

BBQ Breakdown: How Summertime Staples Can Impact Your Health

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

With the 4th of July in the rearview mirror and Labor Day coming down the pike, barbecue season is in full swing. Though some may prefer meatless options like veggie burgers or grilled portabellas, summertime staples like hot dogs and hamburgers still occupy a good bit of that paper plate real estate. In fact, July has been named National Hot Dog Month by the National Hot Dog and Sausage Council and today, July 18, marks this year’s National Hot Dog Day. While these classics have been the center piece of many American BBQs for decades, the harsh reality is that they remain some of the unhealthiest choices. Despite these known risks coming from clinicians, and data from organizations such as the World Health Organizations (WHO), which reported in 2015 that processed meat was linked to an increase in cancer risk, these items are not likely to disappear from party menus. So while moderation is king, we asked Penn experts in nutrition to dissect some typical barbecue fare to show just how

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    18-Jul-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 697437

Cancer Patients May Experience Delayed Skin Effects of Anti-PD-1 Therapy

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Cancer patients receiving anti-PD-1 therapies who develop lesions, eczema, psoriasis, or other forms of auto-immune diseases affecting the skin may experience those adverse reactions on a delay – sometimes even after treatment has concluded.

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16-Jul-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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23-Jul-2018 11:00 AM EDT
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18-Jul-2018 10:25 AM EDT

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Article ID: 697590

Autism Risk Determined by Health of Mother's Gut, UVA Research Reveals

University of Virginia Health System

A mother’s microbiome, the collection of microscopic organisms that live inside us, determines the risk of autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders in her offspring, new research from the UVA School of Medicine shows. The research suggests that we may be able to prevent autism just by altering an expectant mother's diet or by giving her custom probiotics.

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18-Jul-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 697591

Dry Casks Take the Heat

Sandia National Laboratories

Sandia National Laboratories researchers have built a scaled test assembly that mimics a dry cask storage container for spent nuclear fuel to study how fuel temperatures change during storage and how the fuel’s peak temperatures affect the integrity of the metal cladding surrounding the spent fuel. Regulators could use the data to help verify computer simulations that show whether nuclear power utilities are complying with regulations that specify how much heat a dry cask can safely handle.

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18-Jul-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 697572

Splitting Water: Nanoscale Imaging Yields Key Insights

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

In the quest to realize artificial photosynthesis to convert sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide into fuel – just as plants do – researchers need to not only identify materials to efficiently perform photoelectrochemical water splitting, but also to understand why a certain material may or may not work. Now scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have pioneered a technique that uses nanoscale imaging to understand how local, nanoscale properties can affect a material’s macroscopic performance.

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18-Jul-2018 10:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 697582

Novel Approach Studies Whale Shark Ages the Best Way – While They Are Swimming

Nova Southeastern University

Not much is known about whale sharks - and research scientists at Nova Southeastern University's Guy Harvey Research Institute are working to change that.

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18-Jul-2018 9:45 AM EDT
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