Latest News

Filters close
Newswise: Gen. Wesley Clark (ret.) to address Tulane students
Released: 16-Jun-2020 2:25 PM EDT
Gen. Wesley Clark (ret.) to address Tulane students
Tulane University

Clark will speak to students and the public on U.S. strategy during the COVID-19 crisis.

Released: 16-Jun-2020 12:40 PM EDT
Study settles the score on whether the modern world is less violent
University of York

While the first half of the twentieth century marked a period of extraordinary violence, the world has become more peaceful in the past 30 years, a new statistical analysis of the global death toll from war suggests.

Newswise: Kroc Institute identifies Colombia’s next steps in fourth peace implementation report
Released: 16-Jun-2020 11:25 AM EDT
Kroc Institute identifies Colombia’s next steps in fourth peace implementation report
University of Notre Dame

In addition to describing the current status of implementation, the report includes comparative findings and identifies obstacles and opportunities facing Colombia’s peace process.

Released: 16-Jun-2020 11:25 AM EDT
The Power of And: New Book From UVA Darden Professors Examines Responsible Business Without Trade-Offs
University of Virginia Darden School of Business

University of Virginia Darden School of Business Professors Ed Freeman and Bobby Parmar and George Washington University School of Business Professor Kirsten Martin co-authored their new book, The Power of And: Responsible Business Without Trade-Offs, available 13 June from Columbia University Press, to offer a new narrative about the nature of business, revealing the focus on responsibility and ethics that unites today’s most influential ideas and companies.

Newswise: UIC joins network dedicated to preparing future STEM faculty
Released: 16-Jun-2020 11:15 AM EDT
UIC joins network dedicated to preparing future STEM faculty
University of Illinois at Chicago

The University of Illinois at Chicago has been named one of six new members of the Center for the Integration of Research, Teaching and Learning, or CIRTL, an academic network of top research universities devoted to developing and expanding proven STEM teaching practices to educate diverse populations of students.

Newswise: Studying pandemic's effects on sexual health and well-being
Released: 16-Jun-2020 9:45 AM EDT
Studying pandemic's effects on sexual health and well-being
Indiana University

One in five adults in the United States report they have experienced change – mostly a decrease – in their sexual behavior during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study by Indiana University researchers.

12-Jun-2020 1:00 AM EDT
Study Finds Evidence That Loneliness Makes It Harder to Quit Smoking
University of Bristol

In a study published today (15 June 2020) in Addiction, University of Bristol researchers have found evidence for a causal link between prolonged experience of loneliness and smoking.

Newswise: University of Maryland School of Dentistry Offers Certificate in Oral Health Science Program for Non-Dental Health Care Providers
Released: 15-Jun-2020 4:35 PM EDT
University of Maryland School of Dentistry Offers Certificate in Oral Health Science Program for Non-Dental Health Care Providers
University of Maryland, Baltimore

The curriculum is designed to help clinicians recognize and manage oral health infections, diseases, and systemic conditions to more effectively and efficiently improve overall health for their patients.

Newswise: Expert: Supreme Court ruling on LGBTQ workplace protection long overdue
Released: 15-Jun-2020 4:35 PM EDT
Expert: Supreme Court ruling on LGBTQ workplace protection long overdue
Virginia Tech

President Trump is expected to present details of his long-awaited peace plan for Israel and the Palestinians today following his White House meetings with Israeli Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu and leader of the opposition, Benny Gantz, earlier this week Virginia Tech’s foreign policy expert Joel Peters is skeptical that the plan will jumpstart the long-stalled effort to bring Israelis and Palestinians together.

Released: 15-Jun-2020 3:45 PM EDT
Caution urged for reopening schools to prevent spread of COVID-19 crisis
University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., June 15, 2020 — With fast-approaching preparations required for a new school year with no consensus plan yet in place, a team of clinicians, scientists and educators – including a University of California, Irvine pediatrician – stress the need for caution when re-opening America’s schools and advocate for large-scale viral testing in children, contract tracing and other actions to avoid compounding the COVID-19 crisis.

10-Jun-2020 3:00 PM EDT
No Single Solution Helps All Students Complete MOOCs
Cornell University

In one of the largest educational field experiments ever conducted, a team co-led by a Cornell researcher found that promising interventions to help students complete online courses were not effective on a massive scale – suggesting that targeted solutions are needed to help students in different circumstances or locations.

Released: 15-Jun-2020 1:20 PM EDT
Keeping governments accountable: The COVID-10 assessment scorecard
CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy

A new commentary published in Nature Medicine calls for governments to recognize the urgent need to improve their outbreak preparation and response.

Released: 15-Jun-2020 11:25 AM EDT
ICPC 2020 World Finals Moscow: Day Zero
Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT)

ICPC University Commons online activities will kick start on 27 June 2020 with the ICPC 2020 World Finals Moscow: Day Zero. Due to unprecedented travel challenges, ICPC 2020 Moscow hosted by the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT) is scheduled for 19-24 June 2021.

Released: 15-Jun-2020 9:40 AM EDT
Black and Female Principal Candidates More Likely to Experience Delayed and Denied Promotions than White or Male Counterparts
American Educational Research Association (AERA)

Black and female assistant principals are systematically delayed and denied promotion to principal, compared to their White or male counterparts, despite having equivalent qualifications and more experience on average, according to a new study. The findings were published in June in AERA Open, a peer-reviewed, open access journal of the American Educational Research Association.

Released: 15-Jun-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Candidates Who Use Humor on Twitter May Find the Joke Is on Them
Ohio State University

Political candidates’ use of humor on social media could sometimes backfire on them with potential supporters, new research suggests.

Newswise: Story of jailed 17th-century Iberian “mulatto pilgrim” told in new book by John K. Moore Jr.
Released: 12-Jun-2020 4:05 PM EDT
Story of jailed 17th-century Iberian “mulatto pilgrim” told in new book by John K. Moore Jr.
University of Alabama at Birmingham

The book tells the story of a man jailed for impersonating a priest in 1693 Spain, when he was likely trying to escape racial persecution. It gives readers a fascinating look at a centuries-old legal case against a man on pilgrimage and shows how Iberians of black-African ancestry faced discrimination and mistreatment.

Newswise: “Prescribing Art” course teaches med students to recognize bias and better address racial disparities
Released: 12-Jun-2020 4:05 PM EDT
“Prescribing Art” course teaches med students to recognize bias and better address racial disparities
University of Alabama at Birmingham

Can art help doctors better understand their patients and address racial disparities? An innovative collaboration at the University of Alabama at Birmingham uses art to help medical students hone their observational skills, in order to make more accurate diagnoses. “Prescribing Art: How Observation Enhances Medicine” is a partnership between the School of Medicine, the Abroms-Engel Institute for Visual Arts and the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute.

Newswise: Research Links Personality Traits to Toilet Paper Stockpiling
10-Jun-2020 12:05 PM EDT
Research Links Personality Traits to Toilet Paper Stockpiling
PLOS

People who feel more threatened by COVID-19 and rank highly on scales of emotionality and conscientiousness were most likely to stockpile toilet paper in March 2020, according to a new study published June 12, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE.

Newswise:Video Embedded cash-me-outside-transfers-to-the-poor-linked-to-eco-benefits
VIDEO
9-Jun-2020 4:55 PM EDT
Cash Me Outside: Transfers to the Poor Linked to Eco-Benefits
Johns Hopkins University

In a new study, researchers recently discovered that Indonesia’s national anti-poverty program reduced deforestation by about 30%.

Released: 12-Jun-2020 11:05 AM EDT
'Moral Stress' A Malady Afflicting Health Care Workers during Pandemic
Johns Hopkins University Carey Business School

Johns Hopkins Carey Business School Associate Professor Lindsay Thompson, an expert in law and ethics, discusses some of the crushing pressures that health care workers have faced while tending to patients during the COVID-19 epidemic.

9-Jun-2020 5:05 PM EDT
Which College Students Struggle to Accurately Report Their Own Alcohol Use?
Research Society on Alcoholism

How young adults perceive their own drinking habits may distort their self-reported alcohol use, according to a new study in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research. The study scrutinizes the accuracy of participants’ self-reported drinking — a frequent component of alcohol research. Self-reports are prone to inaccuracies, especially in recalling past use. To improve accuracy, researchers often incorporate both “real time” self-reports and retrospective assessments. When these two reports diverge, however, the implications for research are not well understood. For this study, investigators assessed how these two types of self-report differ and what factors may predict inaccurate self-reporting. Unraveling these influences has the potential to improve the accuracy of some alcohol research — and, ultimately, better support people experiencing hazardous drinking.

Released: 12-Jun-2020 9:05 AM EDT
FAA Extends Funding for NEXTOR III Aviation Operations Research Consortium
University of Maryland, Robert H. Smith School of Business

The FAA has extended funding for the Maryland Smith-supported consortium that has developed decision support tools, operational and system concepts, and policymaking tools that benefit the FAA, the airline industry and the flying public.

Newswise:Video Embedded mental-health-in-the-time-of-covid-19-newswise-live-expert-panel-for-june-11-2pm-edt
VIDEO
Released: 12-Jun-2020 9:00 AM EDT
VIDEO AND TRANSCRIPT: Mental Health in the Time of COVID-19, Newswise Live Expert Panel for June 11
Newswise

Mental Health in the Time of COVID-19: Newswise Live Expert Panel for June 11, 2PM EDT

Newswise: UIC College of Education science education expert named NAEd/Spencer Postdoctoral Fellow
Released: 11-Jun-2020 3:05 PM EDT
UIC College of Education science education expert named NAEd/Spencer Postdoctoral Fellow
University of Illinois at Chicago

The former high school teacher has spent 17 years teaching science with a focus on social justice

Newswise: Courageous journalists: URI’s Taricani Lecture Series honors late journalist with discussion on First Amendment
Released: 11-Jun-2020 3:05 PM EDT
Courageous journalists: URI’s Taricani Lecture Series honors late journalist with discussion on First Amendment
University of Rhode Island

The University of Rhode Island’s Harrington School of Communication and Media hosts the Taricani Lecture Series on First Amendment Rights. The series, which will be streamed live, opens Tuesday, June 16, with award-winning journalists and authors Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn. The three-part, virtual lecture series honors the memory of veteran Rhode Island newsman Jim Taricani, who died June 21, 2019, at the age of 69.

Released: 11-Jun-2020 3:00 PM EDT
Place Doesn’t Trump Race as Predictor of Incarceration
Cornell University

Steven Alvarado is the author of “The Complexities of Race and Place: Childhood Neighborhood Disadvantage and Adult Incarceration for Whites, Blacks, and Latinos,” published June 1 in the journal Socius, a study showing that for black Americans growing up in better neighborhoods doesn’t diminish the likelihood of going to prison nearly as much as it does for whites or Latinos.

Released: 11-Jun-2020 11:05 AM EDT
New Documentary Celebrates Clean Air Act, Highlights Communities Still Waiting for Clean Air
American University

To mark the 50th anniversary of the Clean Air Act this year, the Environmental Film Festival in the Nation's Capital (DCEFF) will host the premiere of a new documentary that highlights the dramatic reductions in air pollution that the United States has achieved since Congress passed the Clean Air Act in 1970, as well as the disparities in access to healthy air that persist in America.

Released: 11-Jun-2020 11:05 AM EDT
Nurseries Forced to Support Families in Poverty Through Coronavirus Crisis, Research Shows
University of Sheffield

Nursery staff are having to provide food and help families with benefit claims as the coronavirus pandemic impacts parents with young children, according to new research by the University of Sheffield and Early Education, an early years providers’ membership body.

Newswise: Refugee Children Get Better Health, Nutrition via e-Vouchers
Released: 11-Jun-2020 11:05 AM EDT
Refugee Children Get Better Health, Nutrition via e-Vouchers
Cornell University

Electronic food vouchers provided young Rohingya children in Bangladeshi refugee camps with better health and nutrition than direct food assistance, according to new research led by Cornell University, in conjunction with the International Food Policy Research Institute.

Released: 11-Jun-2020 10:05 AM EDT
Study: News Reports of Education “Achievement Gaps” May Perpetuate Stereotypes of Black Americans
American Educational Research Association (AERA)

Scholars have warned that the framing of racial “achievement gaps” in tests scores, grades, and other education outcomes may perpetuate racial stereotypes and encourage people to explain the gaps as the failure of students and their families rather than as resulting from structural racism. A new study finds that TV news reporting about racial achievement gaps led viewers to report exaggerated stereotypes of Black Americans as lacking education and may have increased implicit stereotyping of Black students as less competent than White students.

Newswise: Government Health, Safety Regulations Backfire with Conservatives, Study Shows
Released: 10-Jun-2020 3:30 PM EDT
Government Health, Safety Regulations Backfire with Conservatives, Study Shows
University of Notre Dame

A new study from the University of Notre Dame shows government-imposed restrictions can backfire, depending on political ideology.

Newswise: Finding Community in Digital Spaces
Released: 10-Jun-2020 12:05 PM EDT
Finding Community in Digital Spaces
West Virginia University

The coronavirus has driven us indoors and separated us from coworkers, friends and loved ones. That’s nothing really new for Sara Loftus, a West Virginia University geography doctoral student who is studying how to build an online community.

Newswise: Political ‘Oil Spill’: Polarization Is Growing Stronger — and Getting Stickier
Released: 10-Jun-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Political ‘Oil Spill’: Polarization Is Growing Stronger — and Getting Stickier
Penn State Institute for Computational and Data Sciences

Experts have documented that political polarization is intensifying in the United States. However, a Penn State sociologist now suggests that this separation isn’t just more intense, but it is also growing broader, coagulating into an ideological slick of opinions.

Newswise: Finding Community in Digital Spaces
Released: 10-Jun-2020 9:25 AM EDT
Finding Community in Digital Spaces
West Virginia University - Eberly College of Arts and Sciences

The coronavirus has driven us indoors and separated us from coworkers, friends and loved ones. That’s nothing really new for Sara Loftus, a geography doctoral student who is studying how to build an online community. See what motivated her to pursue a career in digital caregiving.

Released: 10-Jun-2020 8:05 AM EDT
QS rankings makes MIPT best Russian tech university
Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT)

The latest edition of the QS World University Rankings places MIPT at No. 281 globally, up 21 positions from last year’s results. The Institute has the highest standing of all Russian technical universities featured in the league table.

4-Jun-2020 12:15 PM EDT
Study Identifies Strategies States Use to Limit Local Government Control
New York University

Local governments are often innovators of public health policymaking—the first smoke-free air acts, menu labeling laws, and soda taxes were all implemented locally. However, states are increasingly limiting local control over public health issues by passing laws that overrule local regulations, a practice known as preemption. A new study by researchers at NYU School of Global Public Health, published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, takes a closer look at the strategies state legislatures use—often behind closed doors—to pass preemptive laws that limit local government control.


Showing results

451500 of 45103

close
3.82797