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National Cancer Institute Announces Increase in Fruit and Vegetable Consumption

Porter Novelli, DC

Research shows that adult Americans are eating better. The average adult now eats about four and a half servings of fruits and vegetables a day - a significant step closer to the five or more servings a day recommended by the National Cancer Institute's (NCI) National 5 A Day for Better Health program.

Released:
1-Jan-1998 12:00 AM EST
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    31-Dec-1997 12:00 AM EST

Cardiovascular Costs, Deaths Projected to Rise in 1998

American Heart Association (AHA)

Heart attack, stroke and other cardiovascular diseases could cost the nation about $15 billion more in economic costs in 1998 than they did in 1997, according to figures released today by the American Heart Association in its 1998 Heart and Stroke Statistical Update.

Released:
31-Dec-1997 12:00 AM EST
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Mental Exercise May Help Stave Off Parkinson's

University of Kansas

People who have Parkinson's disease may someday find themselves undergoing a mental training regimen that helps them respond better to the drugs they take and to avoid surgery. Studies by researchers at the University of Kansas hint that exercising your brain every day might be just as important as 20 minutes of physical exercise.

Released:
30-Dec-1997 12:00 AM EST
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For Young Children with Brain Cancer, Innovative Therapy is Promising

NYU Langone Health

Malignant brain cancers in young children can be eradicated with high-dose chemotherapy and stem-cell transplants, eliminating the need for conventional radiation therapy, which causes irreparable physical and psychological damage in young children, according to two studies by New York University School of Medicine researchers.

Released:
30-Dec-1997 12:00 AM EST
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Increased Amount of Enzyme in Brain May Be Marker of Alzheimer's Disease

Northwestern University

An enzyme present in extremely low quantities in normal brains has been found to be greatly increased in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Northwestern University researchers found that the enzyme, butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), increases at the stage when beta-amyloid plaques in the brain become compact and insoluble. These insoluble plaques are one of two early pathological markers of Alzheimer's disease.

Released:
30-Dec-1997 12:00 AM EST
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Natural-born killers: An immunologic enigma solved

Stanford University School of Medicine

Side-by-side papers featured in the December issue of Immunity resolve a mystery of basic immunology while suggesting a new way to improve the success of bone marrow transplantation. The research -- conducted by postdoctoral fellows in the lab of a Stanford structural biologist -- focused on enigmatic white blood cells called natural killer cells.

Released:
25-Dec-1997 12:00 AM EST
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December 97 Tipsheet from ATS

American Thoracic Society (ATS)

The following are articles appearing in the December issue of the "American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine," published by the American Thoracic Society: 1- Fall Weather Brings Increased Hospitalization For Asthmatics; 2- Dust Mites Appear To Be A Dominant Risk Factor For Asthma; 3- Hospitalization for COPD and Asthma Dramatically Increases With Age; 4- Delirium, Acute Confusion and Malnutrition See As Indicators Of Pneumonia In The Elderly

Released:
24-Dec-1997 12:00 AM EST
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Brain Imaging Researchers Receive Grants to Study Reasoning and Decision-making

Carnegie Mellon University

Carnegie Mellon University and University of Pittsburgh researchers have received nearly $16 million to collaborate on a first-ever research effort that will use brain imaging to analyze complex human thought processes--how people make plans, make decisions under time pressure or solve problems.

Released:
24-Dec-1997 12:00 AM EST
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Education Program Relating To Repetitive Stress Injuries (RSI) From Computer Use

Carnegie Mellon University

With debilitating injuries from computer use becoming the fastest growing category of work-related injuries in the U.S., Carnegie Mellon University has launched the first accurate, comprehensive effort to educate its community and the public about the causes and possible prevention of repetitive stress injuries (RSI).

Released:
24-Dec-1997 12:00 AM EST
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"Lead Busters" on the move in Bridgeport

Fairfield University

When the Southern Connecticut Gas Company joined forces with Fairfield University's School of Nursing last year the goal they had in mind was to provide health screening and lead testing for 3,100 adults, adolescents and school-age children, especially children under age 5.

Released:
24-Dec-1997 12:00 AM EST
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