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Antimicrobial "Bug Spray" Found In Human Lung Cells

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Hopkins scientists studying lung damage from cystic fibrosis (CF) have found a natural "bug spray" that lung cells "squirt" on attacking bacteria.

Released:
19-Jun-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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Using Mice And Ultrasound To Unlock The Mysteries Of Human Heart Disease

University of Chicago Medical Center

Researchers at the University of Chicago Hospitals are unlocking the mysteries of human heart disease with transgenic mice and a powerful new cardiovascular ultrasound imaging machine from Hewlett-Packard Company. The result of their efforts using mice could mean improved pharmaceutical treatments, prevention regimens, and possible genetic cures for the millions of humans suffering from heart disease worldwide.

Released:
19-Jun-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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Researchers Investigate Treatment for Tuberculosis

University of New Mexico

The University of New Mexico College of Pharmacy and School of Medicine and the Albuquerque-based Lovelace Research Institutes are teaming up to investigate a new tuberculosis treatment using inhailers to deliver anti-tuberculosis drugs directly to the lungs.

Released:
18-Jun-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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    18-Jun-1997 12:00 AM EDT

Closing in on Birth Control Pill For Men

National Science Foundation (NSF)

It's often been said that love is blind. Now a scientist is hoping that he has found a way to apply that old saying to a new method of family planning. Joseph Hall, a biochemist at North Carolina State University in Raleigh, is unlocking the secrets of sperm, and closing in on a possible birth control pill for men.

Released:
18-Jun-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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    18-Jun-1997 12:00 AM EDT

No Proven Tie Shown Between Silicone Breast Implants and Neurologic Disorders

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Existing research shows no link between silicone breast implants and neurological disorders, according to a special article published by the American Academy of Neurology's Practice Committee in the June issue of the Academy's scientific journal, Neurology.

Released:
17-Jun-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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    18-Jun-1997 12:00 AM EDT

Estrogen Replacement Therapy Reduces Risk of Alzheimer's Disease by 54 Percent

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Women who use estrogen replacement therapy are less likely to develop Alzheimer's disease, according to a study published in the June issue of the American Academy of Neurology's scientific journal, Neurology.

Released:
17-Jun-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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June Tips from American Thoracic Society Journal

American Thoracic Society (ATS)

ATS Journal News Tips--June: 1) Lack of Health Insurance Shortens Lives of Cystic Fribrosis Patients 2) New Compound May Effective For Treating Asthma 3) Study Raises Implications For Gene Therapy For Cystic Fribrosis

Released:
17-Jun-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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Calorie restriction reduces age-related muscle loss

University of Wisconsin-Madison Department of Medicine

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have found that limiting calorie intake later in life can stall some of the muscle deterioration that normally accompanies aging. Reported in the June FASEB Journal, the research involved age-related fiber loss and enzyme and gene abnormalities in rat muscle.

Released:
17-Jun-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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    17-Jun-1997 12:00 AM EDT

STI Hits Development Milestone with Promising Initial Data

Research Corporation Technologies

Sertoli Technologies Inc., a cellular therapy company, has successfully completed its initial stage in developing a transplant therapy using pancreatic islets and Sertoli cells for Type I, or insulin-dependent diabetes.

Released:
17-Jun-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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    17-Jun-1997 12:00 AM EDT

Reversing shock: Gene protects against cell death

University of Maryland, Baltimore

Shock can kill. A heart attack, stroke, infection or injury can cause the profound disturbance of normal cellular functioning that can lead to cell death and even death of the entire organism. University of Maryland School of Medicine researchers have found a potentially powerful new weapon for medicine's war on shock.

Released:
13-Jun-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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