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Newswise: Wheel Lets Researchers Measure Fruit-Fly Exercise
Released: 17-Oct-2016 9:05 AM EDT
Wheel Lets Researchers Measure Fruit-Fly Exercise
University of Alabama

A new study led by corresponding author Dr. Laura Reed suggests that a device called the TreadWheel can be used to study the benefits of exercise on Drosophila — fruit flies.

Released: 17-Oct-2016 9:05 AM EDT
The Economist Again Names UVA Darden School No. 1 Education Experience in the World
University of Virginia Darden School of Business

UVA Darden School of Business is ranked No. 3 overall in The Economist's full-time MBA rankings and is named among the top 5 in several different categories

Newswise:Video Embedded seinfeld-e-patient-dave-and-your-medical-records-what-a-difference-20-years-makes
VIDEO
Released: 17-Oct-2016 9:00 AM EDT
Seinfeld, e-Patient Dave and Your Medical Records: What a Difference 20 Years Makes
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

OpenNotes and health advocate e-Patient Dave team up to remind us just how much has changed in the 20 years since Seinfeld's Elaine tried so desperately to find out what was in her medical record.

Newswise:Video Embedded ohio-health-system-and-california-software-development-company-team-up-to-streamline-medical-lab-testing
VIDEO
Released: 17-Oct-2016 9:00 AM EDT
Ohio Health System and California Software Development Company Team Up to Streamline Medical Lab Testing
ProMedica

Laboratories throughout the country are highly automated operations but logging instruments checks and calibrations to meet regulatory requirements is still mostly a manual paper task. A new medical application virtually eliminates the need for paper logs and allows laboratory engineers and technicians to perform routine quality inspections and equipment maintenance using a tablet. It’s called the Assured Compliance SolutionTM, which was developed by Kapios Health, a joint venture between Toledo-based ProMedica and Palo Alto, Calif.-based Kaonsoft.

Newswise: Johns Hopkins inHealth and Applied Physics Laboratory Join Forces to Revolutionize Medicine
Released: 17-Oct-2016 9:00 AM EDT
Johns Hopkins inHealth and Applied Physics Laboratory Join Forces to Revolutionize Medicine
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins Medicine, in partnership with the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, today announced a joint effort to apply rigorous data analysis and systems engineering practices in an effort to revolutionize the diagnosis and treatment of disease.

Newswise: Study Suggests Gut Bacteria Can Aid Recovery From Spinal Cord Injury
12-Oct-2016 12:05 PM EDT
Study Suggests Gut Bacteria Can Aid Recovery From Spinal Cord Injury
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers from The Ohio State University have discovered that spinal cord injury alters the type of bacteria living in the gut and that these changes can exacerbate the extent of neurological damage and impair recovery of function. The study, “Gut dysbiosis impairs recovery after spinal cord injury,” by Kristina A. Kigerl et al., which will be published online October 17 ahead of issue in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that counteracting these changes with probiotics could aid patients’ recovery from spinal cord injuries.

Released: 17-Oct-2016 8:05 AM EDT
Conference on “the Global Migration Crisis” to Examine Impact of Refugees on Rich & Poor Nations–Oct. 20 at NYU
New York University

New York University will host “The Global Migration Crisis,” a conference that will consider the impact of migrants and refugees on Europe and North America and on the poor countries of origin, on Thurs., Oct. 20, 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Newswise: Wearable Tattoo Sends Alcohol Levels to Your Cell Phone
Released: 17-Oct-2016 8:05 AM EDT
Wearable Tattoo Sends Alcohol Levels to Your Cell Phone
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Engineers funded by NIBIB have developed a small device, worn on the skin, that detects alcohol levels in perspiration and sends the information to the uses smart phone in just 8 minutes. It was designed as a convenient method for individuals to monitor their alcohol intake.

Released: 17-Oct-2016 8:05 AM EDT
Chicago Run for the Warriors® Honors Wounded Military and Their Families
American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA)

The American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) will host the Run For The Warriors® 5K Run/Walk at 6:45 a.m. on Sunday, October 23, in Chicago. The race coincides with the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2016 annual meeting and marks the seventh consecutive year of ASA sponsorship.

Released: 17-Oct-2016 8:05 AM EDT
Reducing Risk of Lung Distress in Preterm Babies
Thomas Jefferson University

Steroids for women at risk of preterm birth improve lung development and reduces risk of severe respiratory distress in babies.

Newswise: ISPOR 19th Annual European Congress to Focus on Managing Access to Medical Innovation
Released: 17-Oct-2016 8:05 AM EDT
ISPOR 19th Annual European Congress to Focus on Managing Access to Medical Innovation
ISPOR—The Professional Society for Health Economics and Outcomes Research

The International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) announced confirmation of the scientific sessions for its 19th Annual European Congress that will begin next week, 29 October-2 November 2016 in Vienna, Austria.

Released: 17-Oct-2016 8:00 AM EDT
USAID Funds Partnership between Mount Sinai’s Arnhold Institute for Global Health and Dimagi to Identify and Forecast Zika Cold Spots
Mount Sinai Health System

— The Arnhold Institute for Global Health at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, software company Dimagi, and Guatemalan NGO TulaSalud announced today that their partnership to locate and assess vulnerable areas in Guatemala to determine their level of risk for a Zika epidemic is being funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID).

Released: 17-Oct-2016 8:00 AM EDT
New GW Battleground Poll: Clinton Begins to Pull Away from Trump, and Voters Think She’ll Win
George Washington University

Hillary Clinton is beginning to pull away from Donald Trump in the presidential race, according to the latest George Washington University Battleground Poll.

13-Oct-2016 1:05 PM EDT
Pregabalin May Lessen Pain From Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Mayo Clinic Study Finds
Mayo Clinic

A pilot study by researchers at Mayo Clinic has found that patients suffering from pain related to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) may benefit from taking pregabalin, a neuro-pain inhibitor commonly used to treat fibromyalgia. The results of the study were presented today at the annual meeting of the American College of Gastroenterology in Las Vegas.

Newswise: Dr. Carol A. Burke Elected President of the American College of Gastroenterology
13-Oct-2016 8:00 AM EDT
Dr. Carol A. Burke Elected President of the American College of Gastroenterology
American College of Gastroenterology (ACG)

Carol A. Burke, MD, FACG, was elected by the membership as the 2016-2017 President of the American College of Gastroenterology (ACG), a national specialty association representing almost 14,000 clinical gastroenterologists and other specialists in digestive diseases. Dr. Burke officially takes her position as President during the College’s 81st Annual Scientific Meeting, held this week in Las Vegas, Nevada.

13-Oct-2016 8:00 AM EDT
New Clinical Advances in Gastroenterology Presented at the American College of Gastroenterology’s 81st Annual Meeting
American College of Gastroenterology (ACG)

More than 5,000 gastroenterologists and other health care professionals from around the world will convene at The Venetian in Las Vegas for the American College of Gastroenterology's (ACG) 81st Annual Scientific Meeting to review the latest scientific advances in gastrointestinal research, treatment of digestive diseases and clinical practice management.

Newswise: Worked to Death? IU Study Says Lack of Control Over High-Stress Jobs Can Lead to Early Grave
Released: 17-Oct-2016 7:00 AM EDT
Worked to Death? IU Study Says Lack of Control Over High-Stress Jobs Can Lead to Early Grave
Indiana University

New research from the Indiana University Kelley School of Business finds that those in high-stress jobs with little control over their workflow die younger or are less healthy than those who have more flexibility and discretion in their jobs and are able to set their own goals as part of their employment.

Newswise: Scientists Uncover New Facets of Zika-Related Birth Defects to Help Develop Treatment
Released: 17-Oct-2016 6:00 AM EDT
Scientists Uncover New Facets of Zika-Related Birth Defects to Help Develop Treatment
Scripps Research Institute

In a study that could one day help eliminate the tragic birth defects caused by Zika virus, scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have elucidated how the virus attacks the brains of newborns, information that could accelerate the development of treatments.

Newswise: Pay-to-Play May Keep Some Kids Out of School Activities
13-Oct-2016 9:45 AM EDT
Pay-to-Play May Keep Some Kids Out of School Activities
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

One in four students from lower-income families did not participate in a single sport, club or art program last school year, a new national poll shows.

Newswise: “That Pizza Was #Delish!” What Do Tweets Say About Our Health?
11-Oct-2016 3:05 PM EDT
“That Pizza Was #Delish!” What Do Tweets Say About Our Health?
University of Utah Health

"Coffee" was the most tweeted food in the continental U.S. between mid-2014 to mid-2015 followed by "beer" then "pizza". Besides hinting at which foods are popular, scientists at the University of Utah are finding that tweets reveal something about our health. Communities that tweeted more often about physical activities, or expressed positive sentiments about healthy foods, had better overall health.

16-Oct-2016 1:05 PM EDT
Honorary Fellowship in the American College of Surgeons Is Awarded to Five Prominent Surgeons
American College of Surgeons (ACS)

Last night Honorary Fellowship in the American College of Surgeons was awarded to five prominent surgeons from Australia, Colombia, Pakistan, France, and Japan.

16-Oct-2016 12:05 PM EDT
Washington, DC Surgeon Mary Maniscalco-Theberge, MD, FACS, Receives Inaugural ACS Mary Edwards Walker Inspiring Women in Surgery Award
American College of Surgeons (ACS)

Mary Maniscalco-Theberge, MD, FACS, received the inaugural American College of Surgeons (ACS) Mary Edwards Walker Inspiring Women in Surgery Award last night during the Convocation ceremony that preceded the opening of the College’s 2016 Clinical Congress.

16-Oct-2016 12:50 PM EDT
Washington, DC, Surgeon Frank G. Opelka, MD, FACS, Received 2016 Distinguished Service Award of the ACS
American College of Surgeons (ACS)

Frank G. Opelka, MD, FACS, a colon and rectal surgeon and Medical Director, Quality and Health Policy, American College of Surgeons (ACS) Division of Advocacy and Health Policy, Washington, DC, received the 2016 ACS Distinguished Service Award (DSA) last night during the Convocation ceremony that preceded the opening of the College’s 2016 Clinical Congress, one of the largest international meetings of surgeons in the world. The DSA is the highest honor bestowed by the ACS.

16-Oct-2016 12:05 PM EDT
Galveston Surgeon Courtney M. Townsend, Jr., MD, FACS, Installed as 97th President of the American College of Surgeons
American College of Surgeons (ACS)

Courtney M. Townsend, Jr., a general surgeon from Galveston, Tex., was installed as the 97th President of the American College of Surgeons last night during the Convocation ceremony of the College.

14-Oct-2016 9:00 AM EDT
Could Assisted Reproduction Reduce Birth Defects for Older Women?
University of Adelaide

Babies born to women aged 40 and over from assisted reproduction have fewer birth defects compared with those from women who conceive naturally at the same age, according to new research from the University of Adelaide.

10-Oct-2016 1:05 PM EDT
New Patient Care Delivery System Enters Health Care ‘Race to Get Bigger’ by Keeping Things Small
Pennsylvania Medical Society

This feature story takes a look at the health care race to get bigger, and Independent Provider Networks. MACRA mentioned.

Newswise: Foster care children at much greater risk of physical, mental health problems
13-Oct-2016 6:30 PM EDT
Foster care children at much greater risk of physical, mental health problems
University of California, Irvine

Children who have been in the U.S. foster care system are at a significantly higher risk of mental and physical health problems – ranging from learning disabilities, developmental delays and depression to behavioral issues, asthma and obesity – than children who haven’t been in foster care, according to a University of California, Irvine sociologist.

Newswise: Developing a Sensor for Vitamin B12 Deficiency
Released: 16-Oct-2016 10:05 PM EDT
Developing a Sensor for Vitamin B12 Deficiency
University of Adelaide

University of Adelaide researchers have developed a world-first optical sensor that can detect vitamin B12 in diluted human blood – a first step towards a low-cost, portable, broadscale vitamin B12 deficiency test. Vitamin B12 deficiency is associated with an increased risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

Newswise: Close Proximity of Slum Dwellers Could Be Answer to Health Problems
14-Oct-2016 7:30 AM EDT
Close Proximity of Slum Dwellers Could Be Answer to Health Problems
University of Warwick

A new study suggests that the ‘neighbourhood effect’ of slums could help to alleviate some of their associated health problems. A team of academics led by Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick have conducted a review of international slum research, which is being published in The Lancet.

Released: 16-Oct-2016 1:30 PM EDT
Fruit-Rich Mediterranean Diet with Antioxidants May Cut Age-Related Macular Degeneration Risk by More Than a Third
American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO)

People who closely follow the Mediterranean diet – especially by eating fruit – may be more than a third less likely to develop age-related macular degeneration, a leading cause of blindness, according to a study presented today at AAO 2016, the 120th annual meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. The study is the first to identify that caffeine may be especially protective against AMD.

Released: 15-Oct-2016 4:05 PM EDT
American Academy of Ophthalmology’s Quality of Care Initiative Generates Clinical Insights on 100 Million Patient Encounters
American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO)

The American Academy of Ophthalmology today announced key milestones in its ongoing effort to use the power of data science to improve medical and surgical eye care. In less than three years since its introduction, the Academy’s IRIS® (Intelligent Research in Sight) Registry is now the world’s largest clinical database. Academy leaders discussed the most recent milestones with the effort during several events at AAO 2016, the Academy’s 120th Annual Meeting.

Released: 14-Oct-2016 5:05 PM EDT
Insight Into Diversity’s 2016 Health Professions Higher Education Excellence in Diversity (HEED) Award Presented to Cal State LA's School of Nursing
California State University, Los Angeles

Cal State LA has received a national award from INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine for its success in fostering diversity and inclusion in the School of Nursing. The INSIGHT's 2016 Health Professions Higher Education Excellence in Diversity (HEED) Award recognizes U.S. medical, dental, pharmacy, osteopathic, nursing and allied health schools that demonstrate an outstanding commitment to diversity and inclusion.

Newswise: WCS Uses Facebook To Stop Wildlife Trafficking in Peru
Released: 14-Oct-2016 4:05 PM EDT
WCS Uses Facebook To Stop Wildlife Trafficking in Peru
Wildlife Conservation Society

NEW YORK (October 14, 2016)—WCS’s Peru Program is fighting wildlife trafficking through a campaign that leverages one of the most effective means of reaching a wide audience: Facebook.

Released: 14-Oct-2016 4:05 PM EDT
Urgent Matters Names Winners of the 2016 Emergency Care Innovation of the Year Award
George Washington University

Urgent Matters, Philips Blue Jay Consulting, and Schumacher Clinical Partners are pleased to announce the winners of the Emergency Care Innovation of the Year Award, a competition to foster innovation in emergency departments nationwide.

Released: 14-Oct-2016 4:05 PM EDT
ARN Past-President Cheryl Lehman Bestows President’s Award to Dr. Grace Campbell and Dr. Beverly Reigle
Association of Rehabilitation Nurses

Association of Rehabilitation Nurses (ARN) Past-President Cheryl Lehman, awarded Dr. Grace Campbell, PhD MSW CRRN, and Dr. Beverly Reigle, PhD RN, the 2016 President’s Award.

Released: 14-Oct-2016 3:05 PM EDT
Kristen L. Mauk, PhD DNP RN CRRN GCNS-BC GNP-BC ACHPN FAAN Incoming Editor of Rehabilitation Nursing Journal
Association of Rehabilitation Nurses

Kristen L. Mauk, PhD DNP RN CRRN GCNS-BC GNP-BC ACHPN FAAN, has accepted the role of editor for Rehabilitation Nursing Journal.

Newswise: Groups Recognize School of Design Faculty, Alumnus for Their Work
Released: 14-Oct-2016 3:05 PM EDT
Groups Recognize School of Design Faculty, Alumnus for Their Work
University of Illinois at Chicago

UIC School of Design Faculty, recent alumnus recognized for their work.

Released: 14-Oct-2016 3:05 PM EDT
AMGA Issues Statement in Response to the MACRA Final Rule
American Medical Group Association (AMGA)

The following statement can be attributed to AMGA President and Chief Executive Officer, Donald W. Fisher, Ph.D., CAE in response to The Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA) final rule released by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) today.

Newswise: New GI Chief at NYU Lutheran to Expand 
Hepatitis C Program, Endoscopic Treatment
Released: 14-Oct-2016 3:05 PM EDT
New GI Chief at NYU Lutheran to Expand Hepatitis C Program, Endoscopic Treatment
NYU Langone Hospital - Brooklyn

As section chief for gastroenterology and hepatology at NYU Lutheran Medical Center, Dr. George Abdelsayed will connect with the many cultural enclaves throughout Brooklyn to develop a hepatitis C screening program to help promote early detection of the disease.

Newswise: Patients Find Comfort with CAPES to Tell Children about Their Illnesses
Released: 14-Oct-2016 3:05 PM EDT
Patients Find Comfort with CAPES to Tell Children about Their Illnesses
Harris Health System

The role of child life specialists is traditionally one of helping hospitalized children cope with their illness, treatment and hospital stay. However, at Harris Health System, child life is breaking with tradition to help patients suffering severe illnesses talk to their children about their medical condition in life and death terms.

Newswise: UT Southwestern Researcher Receives Prestigious NIH Award
Released: 14-Oct-2016 2:05 PM EDT
UT Southwestern Researcher Receives Prestigious NIH Award
UT Southwestern Medical Center

The Transformative Research Award – one of four award categories – promotes cross-cutting, interdisciplinary approaches in research with potential to create or challenge existing paradigms.

Newswise: Diamonds Aren’t Forever: Sandia, Harvard Team Create First Quantum Computer Bridge
Released: 14-Oct-2016 2:05 PM EDT
Diamonds Aren’t Forever: Sandia, Harvard Team Create First Quantum Computer Bridge
Sandia National Laboratories

Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip, all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together

Released: 14-Oct-2016 2:05 PM EDT
Stony Brook Children’s Shares Safety Tricks to Keep Halloween a Treat
Stony Brook University

Halloween is meant to be the spookiest time of year, but no parent wants to experience a real scare on the special night. Stony Brook Children’s experts share tips and tricks on how to steer clear from hidden health and safety dangers.

Released: 14-Oct-2016 2:05 PM EDT
On National Parks Centennial, Sowell Family Collection Brings Nature to You
Texas Tech University

The collection contains the personal documents of some of the country’s most prominent American writers on the natural world, including drafts, published works, correspondence, journals and diaries, photographs, computer files, audio recordings and films.

Newswise: Newly Identified Rare Alzheimer’s Disease Gene Mutation More Common in Icelandic People
12-Oct-2016 3:05 PM EDT
Newly Identified Rare Alzheimer’s Disease Gene Mutation More Common in Icelandic People
PLOS

A rare variant in the TM2D3 gene linked to increased risk and earlier onset of Alzheimer’s disease.


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