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  • Embargo expired:
    1-Sep-1998 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 8759

Agrobacterium Conquers Filamentous Fungi

Nature Biotechnology

Fungal biologists have long searched for a foreign gene delivery system that can be widely applied to filamentous fungi. Dutch researchers report in this issue of Nature Biotechnology a bacterial gene delivery system---previously used to transfer genes into plants---that can efficiently deliver foreign genes to many different species of fungi.

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1-Sep-1998 12:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    1-Sep-1998 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 8758

Beating the Bioterrorist

Nature Biotechnology

Somewhere a capsule shatters, releasing deadly contents. Within a few hours, people begin falling sick. Diagnostic laboratories struggle to meet the spiraling demand. Panic ensues. A bleak scenario, and one which may to some extent be avoided, according to a forward-looking article in this month's issue of Nature Biotechnology.

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1-Sep-1998 12:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 165

Internet Marketing and Branded Products Requiring Hands-On Assessment

Stanford Graduate School of Business

Using a complex economic model, Stanford researchers found that the monopoly pricing associated with quality name-brand products can be sustained in certain cases using the Internet as a channel of distribution. They show that the Internet can actually discourage consumers from searching or window shopping for competing products.

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1-Sep-1998 12:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    31-Aug-1998 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 8829

How a Common Protein Becomes Cancer Killer

University of Wisconsin-Madison

In one of nature's remarkable flukes, scientists in 1991 discovered a protein in frog eggs that proved to be a potent killer of cancer cells. Now a new study by a University of Wisconsin-Madison biochemist finds that a "cousin" of that frog protein found in mammals has the same cancer-fighting potential.

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31-Aug-1998 12:00 AM EDT
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    31-Aug-1998 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 8823

New Genetic Mutation Linked to Breast Cancer

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

A new genetic mutation has been found to modestly increase the risk of hereditary breast cancer in women of Ashkenazi Jewish descent but has an especially pronounced effect in those who already carry the other well-known BRCA mutations linked to the disease, report scientists at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and other research centers in the September issue of Nature Genetics.

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31-Aug-1998 12:00 AM EDT
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    31-Aug-1998 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 8813

Contaminant Discovered in Popular Dietary Supplement, 5-HTP

Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic researchers report finding low levels of a potentially harmful contaminant in off-the-shelf samples of a popular dietary supplement, 5-Hydroxy-L-Trypotophan. The contaminant, called "peak-x", was linked to symptoms suffered by a family exposed to 5-HTP in 1991.

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31-Aug-1998 12:00 AM EDT
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    31-Aug-1998 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 8809

For Fruit Flies, Right Mate Means Longer Living Offspring

University of Georgia

A new study by geneticists at the University of Georgia shows that when female fruit flies are given a choice between mates, their offspring live longer as adults than females who have only a single mate from which to choose. The research is bringing new insights into both female choice and male competition.

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31-Aug-1998 12:00 AM EDT
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    31-Aug-1998 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 8799

How Bacteria Protect Themselves Against Immune Response

Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Scientists at Children's Hospital Medical Center of Cincinnati have discovered a major mechanism by which bacteria protect themselves against the human immune response - a discovery that opens the door for development of a new class of antibiotics to fight infection.

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31-Aug-1998 12:00 AM EDT
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    31-Aug-1998 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 8784

How Low Fat Should You Go

American Heart Association (AHA)

Eating a low-fat diet has been shown to reduce some risk factors associated with heart disease and stroke, but reducing fat in the diet to very low levels may not provide any additional benefit, according to a new statement from the American Heart Association.

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31-Aug-1998 12:00 AM EDT
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    31-Aug-1998 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 8783

Guidelines Not Necessarily Guiding Physician Behavior

American Heart Association (AHA)

An ounce of prevention may be worth a pound of cure, but many people with heart disease may not even get that much, say researchers in a report in today's Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

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31-Aug-1998 12:00 AM EDT
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