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Newswise: Nation’s Ophthalmologists Issue New Advice This July 4th
Released: 1-Jul-2020 12:55 PM EDT
Nation’s Ophthalmologists Issue New Advice This July 4th
American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO)

The American Academy of Ophthalmology and the American Society of Ophthalmic Trauma are concerned that trips to the hospital for fireworks-related injuries will mirror this spike in fireworks sales.

Released: 1-Jul-2020 12:55 PM EDT
Study: Identifying Optimal Points of Intervention to Address Racial and Ethnic Disparities in COVID-19 Fatality Rates in New York State
University at Albany, State University of New York

Results from a new COVID-19 epidemiological study have been released from the University at Albany in partnership with the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH); the findings were published today in the peer-reviewed journal, Annals of Epidemiology.

Newswise: A simpler way to make sensory hearing cells
Released: 1-Jul-2020 12:50 PM EDT
A simpler way to make sensory hearing cells
Keck Medicine of USC

USC Stem Cell scientists have pioneered a simpler way to generate the sensory cells of the inner ear. The study was published in the journal eLife.

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Released: 1-Jul-2020 12:40 PM EDT
Clinical-grade wearables offer continuous monitoring for COVID-19
Northwestern University

Stamp-sized device comprises a suite of clinical-grade sensors, including temperature and pulse oximetry

Released: 1-Jul-2020 11:45 AM EDT
How to Celebrate the Fourth of July During the Pandemic
Rush University Medical Center

While parks and friends’ backyards will be open to celebrate July 4, it’s still important to interact safely with others amid the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Even though more places are reopening in Chicago and around the state, there still is a risk of infection with the COVID-19 virus when outside your home.

Released: 1-Jul-2020 11:40 AM EDT
Antibiotics in Early Life Slows Digestive Nerve Function, Alters Microbiome
American Physiological Society (APS)

A new study finds antibiotic exposure during crucial developmental periods in early childhood alters digestive tract nerve function and bacterial colonies. The study is published in the American Journal of Physiology-Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology.

Released: 1-Jul-2020 11:00 AM EDT
CHOP’s Center for Applied Genomics Receives Funding to Study Risk of Disease Specifically in African Americans
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced today that researchers from Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) are among the recipients of a multi-million dollar grant that focuses on the use of genomics to improve risk assessment for diverse populations and integrate the findings into clinical care.

Newswise: Case Western Reserve University-led team develops new approach to treat certain neurological diseases
29-Jun-2020 7:20 PM EDT
Case Western Reserve University-led team develops new approach to treat certain neurological diseases
Case Western Reserve University

A team led by Case Western Reserve University medical researchers has developed a potential treatment method for Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD), a fatal neurological disorder that produces severe movement, motor and cognitive dysfunction in children. It results from genetic mutations that prevent the body from properly making myelin, the protective insulation around nerve cells.

29-Jun-2020 3:05 PM EDT
Barriers to addiction care fell because of COVID-19, experts say; now the challenge is keeping them down
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

The opioid epidemic didn’t go away when the coronavirus pandemic began. But rapid changes in regulations and guidance could also help many more people get care for addiction, experts say. They caution that it will take more changes to truly lower barriers that stand in the way of delivering evidence-based addiction care to more people via telemedicine.

Newswise: Study Shows Breast Cancer Detected Earlier in States with Expanded Medicaid Coverage
28-Jun-2020 8:00 PM EDT
Study Shows Breast Cancer Detected Earlier in States with Expanded Medicaid Coverage
Yale Cancer Center

In a new study by Yale Cancer Center, researchers have demonstrated that in states with expanded Medicaid coverage through the Affordable Care Act (ACA) a higher percentage of women with breast cancer had their disease diagnosed at an early stage. No such change was seen in states that didn’t expand their coverage. The findings were published today in JAMA Surgery.

Released: 1-Jul-2020 10:45 AM EDT
For the First Time, Study Identifies Time Trends in Pregnancy-Related Outcomes Among American Women with Type 1 Diabetes
Joslin Diabetes Center

Largest US database of pregnant women with type 1 diabetes provides a first-time, big picture view of mother’s health, and neonatal and delivery outcomes. The analysis found a threefold increase in insulin pump use at the end of the study period, compared to the start of the study, but A1c levels remained steady across the 13-year period. Over time the study showed a trend toward pre-pregnancy obesity and unhealthy maternal weight gain.

Released: 1-Jul-2020 10:25 AM EDT
Moffitt Researchers Develop Tool to Detect Patients at High Risk for Poor Lung Cancer Outcomes
Moffitt Cancer Center

In a new study published in Nature Scientific Reports, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers have shown how the use of radiomics can improve lung cancer screening by identifying early stage lung cancer patients who may be at high risk for poorer outcomes, and therefore require aggressive follow-up and/or adjuvant therapy.

Newswise: Suspended studies and virtual lab meetings: How the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting epilepsy researchers
Released: 1-Jul-2020 10:10 AM EDT
Suspended studies and virtual lab meetings: How the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting epilepsy researchers
International League Against Epilepsy

How was epilepsy research forced to morph during the first few months of the COVID-19 pandemic? Researchers from 11 countries shared their experiences and thoughts on the future of laboratory research, clinical trials, and in-person conferences.

Newswise: Exercise can slow or prevent vision loss, study finds
Released: 1-Jul-2020 9:45 AM EDT
Exercise can slow or prevent vision loss, study finds
University of Virginia Health System

Exercise can slow or prevent the development of macular degeneration and may benefit other common causes of vision loss, such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy, new research suggests.

Released: 1-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Kidneycure Announces 2020 Grant Recipients
American Society of Nephrology (ASN)

• Kidney diseases affect more than 850 million people worldwide. • KidneyCure continues to propel positive change in public health, once again funding more than $3 million to support research that changes lives. • This year’s grant recipients, among the best and the brightest in the field, bring energy, innovation and expertise to areas undergoing rapid change: acute kidney injury and repair, home dialysis, and post-transplant care.

Newswise: Expert in Early Phase Therapeutics Joins NYU Langone Health as Associate Director for Clinical Research at Perlmutter Cancer Center
Released: 1-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Expert in Early Phase Therapeutics Joins NYU Langone Health as Associate Director for Clinical Research at Perlmutter Cancer Center
NYU Langone Health

Janice M. Mehnert, MD, a nationally recognized expert in early phase therapeutics and the treatment of skin malignancies, has been appointed associate director for clinical research at NYU Langone Health’s Perlmutter Cancer Center. She assumes her post July 1, 2020.

Newswise: Free Webinar: Economic Impact of COVID and Implications for the Future of Cardiothoracic Surgery
Released: 1-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Free Webinar: Economic Impact of COVID and Implications for the Future of Cardiothoracic Surgery
The Society of Thoracic Surgeons

The COVID pandemic has not only had a devastating humanitarian impact, but it also has shocked health care system finances. In this webinar, STS President Joseph A. Dearani, MD, will talk with cardiothoracic surgeons, a hospital executive, and a health care consultant about various important topics.

Released: 1-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Penn Launches Region’s First Center for Translational Neuromodulation
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

The Penn Brain Science, Translation, Innovation, and Modulation (brainSTIM) Center brings together a team of leading neuroscientists, neurologists, psychiatrists, psychologists, and engineers at Penn using neuromodulation techniques to research, repair, and enhance human brain function—the first translational center of its kind in the region.

Released: 1-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Children and adults should wear masks in public to reduce COVID-19 spread, anesthesia professionals urge
American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA)

Anesthesia professionals urge the public to wear masks to stop spread of COVID-19

Released: 1-Jul-2020 8:50 AM EDT
Journal of the American College of Radiology Increases Impact Factor in New Rankings
American College of Radiology (ACR)

According to the newly released 2020 Journal Citation Report, the Journal of the American College of Radiology (JACR) has achieved a 2019 Impact Factor of 4.268, up from 3.785 last year. This is the journal’s 8th consecutive increase in impact factor year-over-year.

Newswise: NCCN: What People with Cancer and their Caregivers Need to Know about CAR T-Cell Therapy
30-Jun-2020 11:35 AM EDT
NCCN: What People with Cancer and their Caregivers Need to Know about CAR T-Cell Therapy
National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®)

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) has published a new NCCN Guidelines for Patients: Immunotherapy Side Effects focused on chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy. This is book two in a series that includes another book on irAEs focused on immune checkpoint inhibitors.

Newswise: Research Shows Telehealth is an Important Tool
For Rural Hospitals in Treating COVID-19 Patients
Released: 1-Jul-2020 8:30 AM EDT
Research Shows Telehealth is an Important Tool For Rural Hospitals in Treating COVID-19 Patients
Florida Atlantic University

A study of 3,268 hospitals in the U.S. shows that rural hospitals are more likely than urban facilities to have access to telehealth, a once-underused service that now is playing a key role in treating coronavirus patients. The research can help U.S. hospitals understand the extent to which they are prepared for another wave of the pandemic.

Newswise: Understanding Molecular Mechanisms of Air Pollution’s Impact on Interstitial Lung Disease is Critical to Minimizing its Effects
Released: 1-Jul-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Understanding Molecular Mechanisms of Air Pollution’s Impact on Interstitial Lung Disease is Critical to Minimizing its Effects
American Thoracic Society (ATS)

More research must be done to investigate the role of air pollution on the epigenome in patients with interstitial lung diseases (ILDs), in order to develop strategies that minimize the effects of these pollutants, according to a new article published online in the American Thoracic Society’s American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Newswise: Standardized Curriculum Introduces ICU Nurses to ECMO
28-Jun-2020 7:55 PM EDT
Standardized Curriculum Introduces ICU Nurses to ECMO
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN)

Vanderbilt University Medical Center designed and rapidly deployed a curriculum specifically to equip nurses new to ECMO with the knowledge, skills and confidence necessary to provide proficient and safe care for patients receiving ECMO. The pre-COVID ECMO training proved to be an effective, resource-efficient and pragmatic solution that can be used across different types of ICUs and across institutions.

Newswise: The 2020 July Issue of Neurosurgical Focus Examines the Brain-Machine Interface
24-Jun-2020 11:25 AM EDT
The 2020 July Issue of Neurosurgical Focus Examines the Brain-Machine Interface
Journal of Neurosurgery

Announcement of the contents of the 2020 July issue of Neurosurgical Focus.

Newswise: More than medicine: pain-relief drug delivers choices for mothers in labour
Released: 30-Jun-2020 8:05 PM EDT
More than medicine: pain-relief drug delivers choices for mothers in labour
University of South Australia

Choice and control are important factors for ensuring a positive childbirth experience, yet until recently, little was known about the impact of alternative administrations of fentanyl – one of the pain relief drugs used during labour– on both mother and baby.

Newswise: Covid-19 Blood Clotting Cause Identified in Study
29-Jun-2020 1:15 PM EDT
Covid-19 Blood Clotting Cause Identified in Study
Yale Cancer Center

New findings led by Yale Cancer Center researchers and experts across several medical specialties at Yale identify a leading mechanism behind the pathophysiology of Covid-19 and pinpoint a biological marker for the mechanism that may aid in treating these patients.

Newswise: Number of Hospitalizations Can Be Important Clinical Indicator for Head, Neck Cancer Patients
Released: 30-Jun-2020 4:00 PM EDT
Number of Hospitalizations Can Be Important Clinical Indicator for Head, Neck Cancer Patients
Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center

Patients who were unexpectedly hospitalized for dehydration, fever or other ailments while undergoing radiation treatment for head and neck cancers were at a higher risk for less favorable outcomes, a new study from Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center reports.

Newswise: Which Came First? An Experiment in Recreating Primordial Proteins Solves a Long-standing Riddle
Released: 30-Jun-2020 2:40 PM EDT
Which Came First? An Experiment in Recreating Primordial Proteins Solves a Long-standing Riddle
Weizmann Institute of Science

How did the earliest proteins arise, given that the amino acids needed to make them are themselves produced by other proteins – enzymes? The Weizmann Institute's Prof. Dan Tawfik and colleagues recreated primordial proteins to find the answer.

Newswise: COVID-19: Study Shows Virus Can Infect Heart Cells in Lab Dish
Released: 30-Jun-2020 2:35 PM EDT
COVID-19: Study Shows Virus Can Infect Heart Cells in Lab Dish
Cedars-Sinai

A new study shows that SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19 (coronavirus), can infect heart cells in a lab dish, indicating it may be possible for heart cells in COVID-19 patients to be directly infected by the virus. The discovery, published today in the journal Cell Reports Medicine, was made using heart muscle cells that were produced by stem cell technology.

Newswise: Chicago professor, nurse to lead National Institute of Nursing Research
Released: 30-Jun-2020 2:05 PM EDT
Chicago professor, nurse to lead National Institute of Nursing Research
University of Illinois at Chicago

University of Illinois at Chicago professor Shannon Zenk has been selected by the National Institutes of Health to lead its National Institute of Nursing Research, or NINR.

Newswise:Video Embedded researchers-study-state-s-firearm-risk-protection-orders
VIDEO
Released: 30-Jun-2020 1:45 PM EDT
Researchers study state's firearm risk-protection orders
UW Medicine

Since the law was enacted in 2016, 237 petitions have been filed out of concern for an individual's risk of inflicting self-harm and/or harm to others.

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Released: 30-Jun-2020 1:20 PM EDT
Cover your nose—Why proper mask wear and adjustment for breathing comfort is important amid COVID-19
LifeBridge Health

During the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, you’ve probably noticed countless people in public spaces wearing face coverings in a way that leaves their noses uncovered.

Released: 30-Jun-2020 1:10 PM EDT
AACI Welcomes University of Puerto Rico Comprehensive Cancer Center and Cancer Center at Brown University to Membership Roster
Association of American Cancer Institutes (AACI)

This month the Association of American Cancer Institutes (AACI) welcomed University of Puerto Rico Comprehensive Cancer Center (UPRCCC) and Cancer Center at Brown University, bringing the association’s total number of members to 102.

Newswise: Universal Gut Microbiome-Derived Signature Predicts Cirrhosis
Released: 30-Jun-2020 1:05 PM EDT
Universal Gut Microbiome-Derived Signature Predicts Cirrhosis
University of California San Diego Health

UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers report that stool microbiomes of NAFLD patients are distinct enough to potentially be used to accurately predict which persons with NAFLD are at greatest risk for having cirrhosis.

Released: 30-Jun-2020 12:40 PM EDT
COVID-19 Causes ‘Hyperactivity’ in Blood-Clotting Cells
University of Utah Health

Changes in blood platelets triggered by COVID-19 could contribute to the onset of heart attacks, strokes, and other serious complications in some patients who have the disease, according to University of Utah Health scientists. The researchers found that inflammatory proteins produced during infection significantly alter the function of platelets, making them “hyperactive” and more prone to form dangerous and potentially deadly blood clots.

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Released: 30-Jun-2020 12:15 PM EDT
New evidence for how blood clots may form in very ill COVID-19 patients
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Scientists have new evidence that overactive neutrophils--a common type of circulating immune cell--may drive the life-threatening blood clots and inflammation that occur in some patients with COVID-19.

Released: 30-Jun-2020 12:05 PM EDT
Light drinking may protect brain function
University of Georgia

Light to moderate drinking may preserve brain function in older age, according to a new study from the University of Georgia.

Newswise: Story Tips From Johns Hopkins Experts on COVID-19
Released: 30-Jun-2020 12:00 PM EDT
Story Tips From Johns Hopkins Experts on COVID-19
Johns Hopkins Medicine

It seems there will never be enough “thank you’s” for the incredible doctors, nurses, technicians and support staff members who are working around the clock to help patients who have the dangerous coronavirus disease. The dedication, determination and spirit enable Johns Hopkins to deliver the promise of medicine.

Released: 30-Jun-2020 11:50 AM EDT
For Cardiac Rehab Patients, In-Home Portable Air Cleaners Lower Fine-Particle Pollutant Exposure
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

Using an in-home portable air cleaner (PAC) can significantly reduce exposure to fine-particle air pollutants – a major risk factor for cardiovascular events in people with pre-existing heart disease, reports a pilot study in the July issue of Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Newswise: Residents of some cities unwilling to comply with COVID-19 prevention behaviors
Released: 30-Jun-2020 11:45 AM EDT
Residents of some cities unwilling to comply with COVID-19 prevention behaviors
Penn State College of Medicine

Several U.S. cities may be at increased risk of surges in COVID-19 cases as they reopen their economies because their residents are unwilling to follow practices that reduce the spread of the disease, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers.


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