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Released: 8-Jul-2020 12:35 PM EDT
Future Texas hurricanes: Fast like Ike or slow like Harvey?
Rice University

Climate change will intensify winds that steer hurricanes north over Texas in the final 25 years of this century, increasing the odds for fast-moving storms like 2008's Ike compared with slow-movers like 2017's Harvey, according to new research.

Newswise: New cathode coating extends lithium-ion battery life, boosts safety
Released: 8-Jul-2020 12:05 PM EDT
New cathode coating extends lithium-ion battery life, boosts safety
Argonne National Laboratory

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory, in collaboration with Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, has developed a new particle-level cathode coating for lithium ion batteries meant to increase their life and safety.

Released: 8-Jul-2020 11:45 AM EDT
Applying rock dust to croplands could absorb up to 2 billion tonnes of CO2 from the atmosphere, research shows
University of Sheffield

Major new study shows adding rock dust to farmland could remove carbon dioxide (CO2) equivalent to more than the current total emissions from global aviation and shipping combined - or around half of Europe’s current total emissions

Newswise: Making a Material Impact
Released: 8-Jul-2020 10:40 AM EDT
Making a Material Impact
University of Delaware

It’s called CHARM—the University of Delaware’s new Center for Hybrid, Active and Responsive Materials. It will drive fundamental materials science research and enable critical innovations in biomedicine, security, sensing and more.

Newswise: Pandemic Puts Physical Sciences at ‘Tipping Point’ Between Perilous, Vibrant Futures
Released: 8-Jul-2020 10:15 AM EDT
Pandemic Puts Physical Sciences at ‘Tipping Point’ Between Perilous, Vibrant Futures
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Commissioned by the AIP board of directors, “Peril and Promise: Impacts of the COVID-19 Pandemic on the Physical Sciences,” outlines several areas where the scientific community has been tested by the pandemic and examines what the future could look like for the workforce, infrastructure and conduct of research. Calling it “a tipping point,” the panel challenges leaders in government, academia, the private sector and other areas who depend on the physical sciences to craft specific recommendations to address the pandemic’s impacts.

Newswise:Video Embedded scientists-dive-deep-into-hidden-world-of-quantum-states
VIDEO
Released: 8-Jul-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Scientists Dive Deep Into Hidden World of Quantum States
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

A research team led by the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has developed a technique that could lead to new electronic materials that surpass the limitations imposed by Moore’s Law.

Released: 8-Jul-2020 9:55 AM EDT
With State Support, Rensselaer Lab To Play Key Role in Integration of Solar Power
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) recently announced the winners in its Future Grid Challenge, which was created to support the development of solutions that will help integrate renewable energy into the electric grid. Among them was a project in which a lab run by Luigi Vanfretti, an associate professor of electrical, computer, and systems engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, will play a key role.

Newswise:Video Embedded study-reveals-science-behind-traditional-mezcal-making-technique
VIDEO
Released: 8-Jul-2020 9:50 AM EDT
Study reveals science behind traditional mezcal-making technique
Brown University

Artisanal makers of mezcal have a tried and true way to tell when the drink has been distilled to the right alcohol level.

Newswise: Dilophosaurus-Puppet-Low-front-mouth-open-scaled-1200x800-c-default.jpg
Released: 8-Jul-2020 9:45 AM EDT
Famous ‘Jurassic Park’ Dinosaur is Less Lizard, More Bird
University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin)

From movies to museum exhibits, the dinosaur Dilophosaurus is no stranger to pop culture. Many probably remember it best from the movie “Jurassic Park,” where it’s depicted as a venom-spitting beast with a rattling frill around its neck and two paddle-like crests on its head.

Newswise: Where Did the Asian Longhorned Ticks in the U.S. Come From?
Released: 8-Jul-2020 9:30 AM EDT
Where Did the Asian Longhorned Ticks in the U.S. Come From?
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

The invasive population of Asian longhorned ticks in the United States likely began with three or more self-cloning females from northeastern Asia, according to a Rutgers-led study. Asian longhorned ticks outside the U.S. can carry debilitating diseases. In the United States and elsewhere they can threaten livestock and pets. The new study, published in the journal Zoonoses and Public Health, sheds new light on the origin of these exotic ticks and how they are spreading across the United States.

Newswise: Purifying water with the help of wood, bacteria and the sun
2-Jul-2020 10:15 AM EDT
Purifying water with the help of wood, bacteria and the sun
American Chemical Society (ACS)

Researchers reporting in Nano Letters have developed a wood-based steam generator that, with the help of bacterial-produced nanomaterials, harnesses solar energy to purify water.

Newswise: Chicago Quantum Exchange welcomes seven new partners in tech, computing and finance, to advance research and training
Released: 7-Jul-2020 5:25 PM EDT
Chicago Quantum Exchange welcomes seven new partners in tech, computing and finance, to advance research and training
Argonne National Laboratory

The Chicago-based research hub expands to include 13 total industry leaders in tech, computing, finance.

Newswise: Shock-dissipating fractal cubes could forge high-tech armor
Released: 7-Jul-2020 4:35 PM EDT
Shock-dissipating fractal cubes could forge high-tech armor
Los Alamos National Laboratory

Tiny, 3D printed cubes of plastic, with intricate fractal voids built into them, have proven to be effective at dissipating shockwaves, potentially leading to new types of lightweight armor and structural materials effective against explosions and impacts.

Newswise: When it comes to Smart Cities, St. Louis is Leading by Example
Released: 7-Jul-2020 4:05 PM EDT
When it comes to Smart Cities, St. Louis is Leading by Example
Homeland Security's Science And Technology Directorate

St. Louis was selected as the site for the first SCIRA exercise. The pilot program brought together first responders, city managers and other stakeholders, and through a series of realistic disaster scenarios, demonstrated how smart city technology can transform municipal emergency response.

Newswise: Supercomputer Simulations Help Researchers Predict Solar Wind Storms
Released: 7-Jul-2020 3:05 PM EDT
Supercomputer Simulations Help Researchers Predict Solar Wind Storms
University of California San Diego

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire used SDSC's Comet supercomputer to validate a model using a machine learning technique called Dynamic Time Lag Regression (DTLR) to help predict the solar wind arrival near the Earth’s orbit from physical parameters of the Sun.

Newswise: LLLNL Director Bill Goldstein Announces Retirement Pending Search for Successor
Released: 7-Jul-2020 2:35 PM EDT
LLLNL Director Bill Goldstein Announces Retirement Pending Search for Successor
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

William H. Goldstein today announced he will retire as director of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and president of Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, (LLNS) following the selection of his successor.

Newswise: Welcome, Robin the AI robot
Released: 7-Jul-2020 2:05 PM EDT
Welcome, Robin the AI robot
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, UCLA Mattel Children’s Hospital launched an innovative project to support the emotional needs of children through a new AI powered robot. Robin’s technology enables the robot to build what is called associative memory — it recognizes a child’s emotions by interpreting his or her facial expressions and builds responsive dialogue by replicating patterns formed from previous experiences.

Newswise: Precise Measurement of Pions Confirms Understanding 
of Fundamental Symmetry
Released: 7-Jul-2020 1:45 PM EDT
Precise Measurement of Pions Confirms Understanding of Fundamental Symmetry
Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

Nuclear physicists have announced the most precise measurement yet of the ultra-short lifetime of the neutral pion. The result is an important validation of our understanding of the theory of quantum chromodynamics, which describes the makeup of ordinary matter. The research, carried out at the Department of Energy’s Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, was recently published in the journal Science.

Newswise: 236720_web.jpg
Released: 7-Jul-2020 1:35 PM EDT
1.5 billion people will depend on water from mountains
University of Zurich

Global water consumption has increased almost fourfold in the past 100 years, and many regions can only meet their water demand thanks to essential contributions from mountain regions.

Newswise: Community science birding data does not yet capture global bird trends
Released: 7-Jul-2020 1:20 PM EDT
Community science birding data does not yet capture global bird trends
University of Utah

Ornithologists at the University of Utah say that community science bird data shows different trends in bird populations than professional bird surveys do, especially in developing countries. More observations are needed, the researchers say, both by birders and professionals.

Newswise: 236726_web.jpg
Released: 7-Jul-2020 1:10 PM EDT
A chemical cocktail of air pollution in Beijing, China during COVID-19 outbreak
Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences

The novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) spreads rapidly around the world, and has limited people's outdoor activities substantially.

Newswise: 236748_web.jpg
Released: 7-Jul-2020 12:30 PM EDT
Tree rings show unprecedented rise in extreme weather in South America
Earth Institute at Columbia University

Scientists have filled a gaping hole in the world's climate records by reconstructing 600 years of soil-moisture swings across southern and central South America.

Newswise: A Study Provides New Insights Into van der Waals Materials
Released: 7-Jul-2020 12:05 PM EDT
A Study Provides New Insights Into van der Waals Materials
Penn State Materials Research Institute

Van der Waals materials that are layered on top of each other are of high interest for electronic and photonic applications. A recent study by Penn State and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, in California, provides new insights into the interactions of layered materials with laser and electron beams.

Released: 7-Jul-2020 11:40 AM EDT
Beaumont researchers develop COVID-19 test that can detect virus in saliva, blood or urine in 45 minutes
Beaumont Health

Rapid test for COVID-19 can help contain the virus and contribute to a successful reopening of the economy

2-Jul-2020 1:55 PM EDT
Newer Solar Power Equipment Ages Better Than Older Units
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Utility-scale photovoltaics are the largest sector of the overall solar market within the U.S. and the fastest-growing form of renewable power generation, and this fleet of utility-scale photovoltaic projects is relatively young and hasn’t been operating long enough to establish a lengthy history of operational field service. In the Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy, researchers assess the performance of 411 utility-scale photovoltaic projects built within the U.S. from 2007 through 2016.

Newswise: Cooling Mechanism Increases Solar Energy Harvesting for Self-Powered Outdoor Sensors
1-Jul-2020 1:50 PM EDT
Cooling Mechanism Increases Solar Energy Harvesting for Self-Powered Outdoor Sensors
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Thermoelectric devices, which use the temperature difference between the top and bottom of the device to generate power, offer some promise for harnessing naturally occurring energy. In Applied Physics Letters, authors tested a device made up of a wavelength-selective emitter that constantly cools the device during the day using radiative cooling. As a result, the top of the device is cooler than the bottom, causing a temperature difference that creates constant voltage through day and night and various weather conditions.

Newswise: The science of sound: Researchers suggest use of artificial tones in perception experiments could be missing the mark
Released: 7-Jul-2020 10:35 AM EDT
The science of sound: Researchers suggest use of artificial tones in perception experiments could be missing the mark
McMaster University

Researchers at McMaster University who study how the brain processes sound have discovered the common practice of using artificial tones in perception experiments could mean scientists are overlooking important and interesting discoveries in the field of brain research

Released: 7-Jul-2020 10:10 AM EDT
New Research Reveals Regulatory Features Of The Maize Genome During Early Reproductive Development
Donald Danforth Plant Science Center

A team of researchers led by Andrea Eveland, Ph.D., assistant member, Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, has mapped out the non-coding, ‘functional’ genome in maize during an early developmental window critical to formation of pollen-bearing tassels and grain-bearing ears.

Released: 7-Jul-2020 9:40 AM EDT
Bristol engineers pioneer project to protect Nepal’s future generations from earthquakes
University of Bristol

In 2015, a devastating earthquake in Nepal resulted in the loss of 9,000 lives, 3.5 million people left homeless and entire neighbourhoods flattened. To prevent destruction on the same scale again, the multidisciplinary team behind The SAFER Nepal Project has been working with local partners to improve the seismic safety and resilience of school and community buildings in Nepal.

Newswise: How to Tackle Climate Change, Food Security and Land Degradation
Released: 7-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
How to Tackle Climate Change, Food Security and Land Degradation
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

How can some of world’s biggest problems – climate change, food security and land degradation – be tackled simultaneously? Some lesser-known options, such as integrated water management and increasing the organic content of soil, have fewer trade-offs than many well-known options, such as planting trees, according to a Rutgers-led study in the journal Global Change Biology.

Newswise: Symbiotic underground fungi disperse by wind, new study finds
6-Jul-2020 4:50 PM EDT
Symbiotic underground fungi disperse by wind, new study finds
DePaul University

A new study published in the journal New Phytologist from a research team led by environmental scientist Bala Chaudhary at DePaul University uncovered previously undiscovered patterns in the dispersal of mycorrhizal fungi that could help ecologists understand how these beneficial fungi travel.

25-Jun-2020 2:35 PM EDT
Campus 20th anniversary of posting the assembled genome to the Internet
University of California, Santa Cruz

UC Santa Cruz researchers played a crucial role in early planning of the human genome project, in assembling the genome sequence, developing tools for its visualization and ensuring it remained in the public domain. They continue to have a major role in the ongoing analysis of the human genome.

Released: 6-Jul-2020 5:10 PM EDT
DHS Selects George Washington University to Pilot New Center of Excellence in Security Technology Transition
Homeland Security's Science And Technology Directorate

DHS S&T announced today the selection of The George Washington University to lead a new COE that will deliver a pilot Master of Business Administration program focused on security technology transition from federal research and development to operational use.

Released: 6-Jul-2020 5:05 PM EDT
European ancestry plays role in 'killer' honey bees' aggressiveness
York University

What causes African hybrid honey bees (AHB), also known as killer bees, to be highly defensive and aggressive? York University researchers have found it was the mixing of African and European genetics that led to hyper-aggression in this invasive strain of honey bees.

Newswise: Improving wildfire emissions model
Released: 6-Jul-2020 4:50 PM EDT
Improving wildfire emissions model
South Dakota State University

New satellite instrumentation will help researchers estimate fire emissions every half hour for the United States.

Released: 6-Jul-2020 2:35 PM EDT
New Research Reveals Privacy Risks of Home Security Cameras
Queen Mary University of London

An international study has used data from a major home Internet Protocol (IP) security camera provider to evaluate potential privacy risks for users.

Newswise: 236475_web.jpg
Released: 6-Jul-2020 2:25 PM EDT
Palm trees most abundant in American rainforests
Uppsala University

Characteristics of palm trees differ from those of other tropical trees in many ways.

Released: 6-Jul-2020 2:20 PM EDT
Simulations shows magnetic field can change 10 times faster than previously thought
University of Leeds

A new study by the University of Leeds and University of California at San Diego reveals that changes in the direction of the Earth's magnetic field may take place 10 times faster than previously thought.

Released: 6-Jul-2020 2:10 PM EDT
What If People Use Autonomous Vehicles To Do Bad Things?
North Carolina State University

There’s a fairly large flaw in the way that programmers are currently addressing ethical concerns related to artificial intelligence and autonomous vehicles (AVs). Namely, existing approaches don’t account for the fact that people might try to use the AVs to do something bad.

Newswise: mayall-telescope-interior-berkeley.jpg
Released: 6-Jul-2020 2:05 PM EDT
Five thousand eyes on the skies: Scientists choreograph robots to observe distant galaxies
Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab)

Scientists have begun operating the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument, or DESI, to create a 3-D map of over 30 million galaxies and quasars that will help them understand the nature of dark energy. The new instrument is the most advanced of its kind, with 5,000 robotic positioners that will enable scientists to gather more than 20 times more data than previous surveys. Researchers at Fermilab helped develop the software that will direct these positioners to focus on galaxies several billion light-years away and are currently in the process of fine-tuning the programs used before the last round of testing later this year.

Newswise: Newly discovered pathogen in NY apples causes bitter rot disease
Released: 6-Jul-2020 1:50 PM EDT
Newly discovered pathogen in NY apples causes bitter rot disease
Cornell University

In a study of New York state apple orchards, Cornell University plant pathologists have identified a new fungal pathogen that causes bitter rot disease in apples.

Newswise: What Is the World Doing to Create a COVID-19 Vaccine?
Released: 6-Jul-2020 1:10 PM EDT
What Is the World Doing to Create a COVID-19 Vaccine?
Council on Foreign Relations (CFR)

The race to find a vaccine for the new coronavirus is well underway. Governments and researchers are aiming to provide billions of people with immunity in eighteen months or less, which would be unprecedented.

Newswise: 236561_web.jpg
Released: 6-Jul-2020 12:35 PM EDT
Coconut confusion reveals consumer conundrum
University of Exeter

Coconut oil production may be more damaging to the environment than palm oil, researchers say.

Newswise: Greenhouse gas and particulate pollution emissions drive regional drying around the globe
Released: 6-Jul-2020 11:55 AM EDT
Greenhouse gas and particulate pollution emissions drive regional drying around the globe
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Despite devastating impacts of drought on human and natural systems, the reasons why long-term regional drying occurs remain poorly understood. Research led by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists have identified two signatures or “fingerprints” that explain why arid conditions are spreading worldwide, and why the Western United States has tended towards drought conditions since the 1980s while the African Sahel has recovered from its prolonged drought. The research appears in the July 6 edition of Nature Climate Change.

Newswise: 236608_web.jpg
Released: 6-Jul-2020 11:55 AM EDT
Why it's no last orders for the Tequila bat
University of Bristol

Native to the Americas, the tequila bat (Leptonycteris yerbabuenae) lives in caves in some of the hottest desert areas in Mexico.

Newswise: Mission to Mars: @UNLV Scientist Gives Insider Glimpse at NASA's 2020 Rover Mission
Released: 6-Jul-2020 11:55 AM EDT
Mission to Mars: @UNLV Scientist Gives Insider Glimpse at NASA's 2020 Rover Mission
University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV)

Silver, bug-eyed extraterrestrials zooming across the cosmos in bullet-speed spaceships. Green, oval-faced creatures hiding out in a secret fortress at Nevada’s Area 51 base. Cartoonish, throaty-voiced relatives of Marvin the Martian who don armor and Spartan-style helmets. We humans are fascinated with the possibility of life on the Red Planet.


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