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Newswise: The Medical Minute: Preventing suicide during COVID-19
Released: 16-Sep-2020 7:05 PM EDT
The Medical Minute: Preventing suicide during COVID-19
Penn State Health

People contemplating suicide want help. As the COVID-19 pandemic raises the overall level of anxiety, a Penn State Health expert explains how you can help people in crisis in this week’s Medical Minute.

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Embargo will expire: 18-Sep-2020 8:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 16-Sep-2020 5:45 PM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 18-Sep-2020 8:00 AM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Released: 16-Sep-2020 5:30 PM EDT
Vulnerable groups affected by public transit cuts amid pandemic
McGill University

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, public transport agencies across North America have made significant adjustments to services, including cutting trip frequency in many areas while increasing it in others.

Newswise:Video Embedded mapping-cavefish-brains-leads-to-neural-origin-of-behavioral-evolution
VIDEO
Released: 16-Sep-2020 5:30 PM EDT
Mapping Cavefish Brains Leads to Neural Origin of Behavioral Evolution
Florida Atlantic University

While studied for nearly a century, little is known about how cavefish brains differ. A study is the first to look inside their brains with millimeter resolution to start to understand how the individual neurons and brain regions that drive complex behaviors, including sleep and feeding have evolved. This work has broad implications for the understanding of how brains evolve in many different animal models and is hoped to be widely used by the scientific community.

Newswise: Most landslides in western Oregon triggered by heavy rainfall, not big earthquakes
Released: 16-Sep-2020 5:20 PM EDT
Most landslides in western Oregon triggered by heavy rainfall, not big earthquakes
University of Washington

Deep-seated landslides in the central Oregon Coast Range are triggered mostly by rainfall, not by large offshore earthquakes.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 26-Sep-2020 5:10 PM EDT Released to reporters: 16-Sep-2020 5:10 PM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 26-Sep-2020 5:10 PM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Released: 16-Sep-2020 4:55 PM EDT
Viral load predicts mortality rate in hospitalized patients with cancer and COVID-19
Cell Press

Higher viral loads are associated with a greater risk of death among cancer and non-cancer patients hospitalized with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), researchers report September 15 in the journal Cancer Cell.

Newswise: JoAnn Trejo selected for 2020 ASCB Prize for Excellence in Inclusivity
Released: 16-Sep-2020 4:25 PM EDT
JoAnn Trejo selected for 2020 ASCB Prize for Excellence in Inclusivity
American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB)

The ASCB has named JoAnn Trejo as the 2020 recipient of the Prize for Excellence in Inclusivity. Trejo is a professor of Pharmacology and Assistant Vice Chancellor for Health Sciences Faculty Affairs at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) where she has made significant contributions to the understanding of cell signaling by protease-activated G protein-coupled receptors.

Released: 16-Sep-2020 4:20 PM EDT
Biden’s False Attacks on Trump’s Social Security ‘Plan’
Newswise

A Biden campaign TV ad falsely claims that a government analysis of President Donald Trump’s “planned cuts to Social Security” shows that “if Trump gets his way, Social Security benefits will run out in just three years from now.”

Newswise: Join Online Events to Celebrate Bird Migration
Released: 16-Sep-2020 4:15 PM EDT
Join Online Events to Celebrate Bird Migration
Cornell University

Day and night, across the country right now, a river of migrating birds is flowing overhead. The Cornell Lab of Ornithology holds its Migration Celebration to take note of this remarkable natural phenomenon. This year, Migration Celebration is taking place virtually with two weeks of special online events, including articles, activities, and live events.

Newswise: 243026_web.jpg
Released: 16-Sep-2020 4:05 PM EDT
Future autonomous machines may build trust through emotion
Army Research Laboratory

Army research has extended the state-of-the-art in autonomy by providing a more complete picture of how actions and nonverbal signals contribute to promoting cooperation.

10-Sep-2020 5:00 PM EDT
Beyond Plaques and Tangles: Genetic Variation May Increase Risk of Cognitive Decline
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

A genetic variation in some people may be associated with cognitive decline that can’t be explained by deposits of two key proteins associated with Alzheimer’s disease, amyloid β and tau, according to a study published in the September 16, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The genetic variation leads to alterations in the metabolism of glutathione, an antioxidant, and may be associated with thinning of the cortex of the brain, the study says. The variation is found on the sixth chromosome.

10-Sep-2020 4:55 PM EDT
Could Monitoring Blood Pressure Help Reduce Falls for People with Parkinson’s?
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

People with Parkinson’s disease are more likely than people of a similar age without the disease to have a sudden drop in blood pressure upon standing, a phenomenon called orthostatic hypotension, according to a new study published in the September 16, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The drop in blood pressure can lead to dizziness, lightheadedness, and even loss of consciousness and falls.

Newswise: 243006_web.jpg
Released: 16-Sep-2020 3:40 PM EDT
Dust may have controlled ancient human civilization
Geological Society of America (GSA)

When early humans began to travel out of Africa and spread into Eurasia over a hundred thousand years ago, a fertile region around the eastern Mediterranean Sea called the Levant served as a critical gateway between northern Africa and Eurasia.

Newswise: Saint Louis University Establishes New Institute for Healing Justice and Equity
Released: 16-Sep-2020 3:20 PM EDT
Saint Louis University Establishes New Institute for Healing Justice and Equity
Saint Louis University

The Institute for Healing Justice and Equity has been established to help eliminate disparities caused by systemic oppression and to promote healing.

Released: 16-Sep-2020 3:05 PM EDT
Did our early ancestors boil their food in hot springs?
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Some of the oldest remains of early human ancestors have been unearthed in Olduvai Gorge, a rift valley setting in northern Tanzania where anthropologists have discovered fossils of hominids that existed 1.8 million years ago.

Newswise: T cells take the lead in controlling SARS-CoV-2 and reducing COVID-19 disease severity
Released: 16-Sep-2020 2:55 PM EDT
T cells take the lead in controlling SARS-CoV-2 and reducing COVID-19 disease severity
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

A multi-layered, virus-specific immune response is important for controlling SARS-CoV-2 during the acute phase of the infection and reducing COVID-19 disease severity, with the bulk of the evidence pointing to a much bigger role for T cells than antibodies.

Newswise: 243047_web.jpg
Released: 16-Sep-2020 2:40 PM EDT
Modern theory from ancient impacts
University of Tokyo

Around 4 billion years ago, the solar system was far less hospitable than we find it now. Many of the large bodies we know and love were present, but probably looked considerably different, especially the Earth.

Newswise: Study: Europe’s Old-Growth Forests at Risk
Released: 16-Sep-2020 2:35 PM EDT
Study: Europe’s Old-Growth Forests at Risk
University of Vermont

A new study presents the first comprehensive assessment of the conservation status of primary forests in Europe—and shows that many of them are not protected and at risk of being destroyed. The researchers conclude that formal conservation of these forests should be a top priority for EU countries to meet their climate change and biodiversity goals.

Released: 16-Sep-2020 2:35 PM EDT
AANA Joins Patient Safety Movement Foundation in Celebrating World Patient Safety Day Sept. 17
American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA)

This World Patient Safety Day, Sept. 17, the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA) joins the Patient Safety Movement Foundation (PSMF) in celebrating healthcare safety and raising global awareness.

Newswise: To Reduce Colorectal Cancer Disparities among African American Men, More Intervention Research Is Urgently Needed
Released: 16-Sep-2020 2:20 PM EDT
To Reduce Colorectal Cancer Disparities among African American Men, More Intervention Research Is Urgently Needed
Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah

African American men have the lowest five-year survival rate for colorectal cancer (CRC) out of any other racial group. A major factor is low adherence to recommended early detection screening. Yet published research on effective strategies to increase screening for this group specifically are minimal. These findings were published today in PLOS ONE.

Released: 16-Sep-2020 2:20 PM EDT
Researchers ask: how sustainable is your toothbrush?
Trinity College Dublin

Researchers at Trinity College Dublin have examined the sustainability of different models of the most commonly used oral health product - the toothbrush - to ascertain which is best for the planet and associated human health.

Newswise: Discovery of a new mass extinction
15-Sep-2020 8:10 AM EDT
Discovery of a new mass extinction
University of Bristol

It’s not often a new mass extinction is identified; after all, such events were so devastating they really stand out in the fossil record. In a new paper, published today in Science Advances, an international team has identified a major extinction of life 233 million years ago that triggered the dinosaur takeover of the world. The crisis has been called the Carnian Pluvial Episode.

10-Sep-2020 10:25 AM EDT
When do people retweet health agencies’ COVID-19 messages?
PLOS

An analysis of Twitter messages has surfaced certain features of COVID-19-related tweets by public health agencies that were associated with a higher likelihood of the tweets being passed along—“retweeted”—by individual Twitter users.

Newswise: What it takes to shoot a laser on Mars
Released: 16-Sep-2020 1:50 PM EDT
What it takes to shoot a laser on Mars
Los Alamos National Laboratory

For the better part of a decade, an extraordinary tool aboard NASA’s Curiosity rover has been investigating the chemical building blocks of life and making exciting discoveries about Mars’ habitability.

Newswise: Turbulence affects aerosols and cloud formation
Released: 16-Sep-2020 1:40 PM EDT
Turbulence affects aerosols and cloud formation
Michigan Technological University

Turbulent air in the atmosphere affects how cloud droplets form. New research from Michigan Technological University’s cloud chamber changes the way clouds, and therefore climate, are modeled.

Newswise: UC Davis applies microneedles to deliver gene therapy inside the eye
Released: 16-Sep-2020 1:25 PM EDT
UC Davis applies microneedles to deliver gene therapy inside the eye
UC Davis Health

A novel approach to delivering gene therapy for retinal diseases eliminates the need for complex eye surgery and treats more damaged cells than existing methods, a team of UC Davis physicians and veterinary eye specialists has found.

Released: 16-Sep-2020 1:10 PM EDT
Researchers Discover New Photoactivation Mechanism for Polymer Production
North Carolina State University

Researchers have demonstrated a way to use low-energy, visible light to produce polymer gel objects from pure monomer solutions. The work sheds further light on the ways in which low energy photons can combine to produce high energy excited states.

Released: 16-Sep-2020 1:10 PM EDT
Rush University Awarded “Real Funding To Make Big Progress” in Battling Parkinson’s
Rush University Medical Center

Rush Medical College will be leading one of 21 teams receiving significant funding in hopes of making major advances in the fight against Parkinson’s disease.

Released: 16-Sep-2020 12:50 PM EDT
The unintended consequence of becoming an empathetic person
Michigan State University

People generally want to improve on things like being more emotionally connected to others, but researchers found that this leads to changes in their political souls as well.

Released: 16-Sep-2020 12:25 PM EDT
Breakthrough telescope in Chile renamed for benefactor Cornell alum
Cornell University

The powerful new telescope being built for an exceptional high-elevation site in Chile by a consortium of U.S., German and Canadian academic institutions, led by Cornell University, has a new name: the Fred Young Submillimeter Telescope (FYST).

Newswise:Video Embedded new-great-lakes-modeling-improves-operational-forecast-system
VIDEO
Released: 16-Sep-2020 12:20 PM EDT
New Great Lakes modeling improves operational forecast system
Michigan Technological University

Forecasting the water levels, temperatures, and currents of the Great Lakes is important because conditions on the lakes affect commerce, recreation, and community well-being. These forecasts comprise the Great Lakes Operational Forecast System (GLOFS), an automated model-based prediction system operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Michigan Tech helps NOAA improve the GLOFS model.

Newswise: Marine animals live where ocean is most ‘breathable,’ but ranges could shrink with climate change
Released: 16-Sep-2020 12:10 PM EDT
Marine animals live where ocean is most ‘breathable,’ but ranges could shrink with climate change
University of Washington

Research shows that many marine animals already inhabit the maximum range of breathable ocean that their physiology allows. The findings are a warning about climate change: Since warmer waters harbor less oxygen, stretches of ocean that are breathable today for a species may not be in the future.

Released: 16-Sep-2020 12:05 PM EDT
"The Most Innovative Product" awarded to novel dietary supplement spermidineLIFE®
Longevity Labs Inc.

TLL The Longevity Labs GmbH (Longevity Labs+), an Austrian-based life sciences company, and its wholly-owned, US subsidiary, Longevity Labs Inc., are proud to announce their award for "The Most Innovative OTC-Product" at the German 2020 Pharma Trend Image & Innovation Awards in Munich, for their novel dietary supplement, spermidineLIFE®.

Newswise: New detect-and-disinfect technology to be developed, tested at the University of North Dakota
Released: 16-Sep-2020 12:05 PM EDT
New detect-and-disinfect technology to be developed, tested at the University of North Dakota
University of North Dakota

What if, when confronted with a COVID-contaminated countertop, cockpit or control panel, a person could decontaminate the entire surface by zapping it with a handheld ultraviolet light? Technology that UND is testing and helping to develop could make it possible for people to do just that. And if the testing is successful, the U.S. Air Force and the global food-services industry are just two of the industrial behemoths that are likely to be interested. Supported by a $1.5 million grant from the North Dakota Department of Agriculture, SafetySpect Inc. – a California-based company – is bringing its virus-fighting solution to multiple UND labs for experimentation.

Newswise: Where Trouble Starts
Released: 16-Sep-2020 11:45 AM EDT
Where Trouble Starts
University of Delaware

In the earliest hours of your embryonic status, cells were developing and multiplying, critical processes were starting up, networks were connecting and genetic codes — for better or worse — were directing the whole project. That early development is the focus of University of Delaware biologist Shuo Wei's research. Now his work has won more than $1.8 million in support from the National Institutes of Health.

Released: 16-Sep-2020 11:40 AM EDT
Can life survive a star’s death? Webb telescope can reveal the answer
Cornell University

When stars like our sun die, all that remains is an exposed core – a white dwarf. A planet orbiting a white dwarf presents a promising opportunity to determine if life can survive the death of its star, according to Cornell University researchers.

Newswise: MTU and Argonne engineers improve signal processing for smaller fiber optic cables
Released: 16-Sep-2020 11:35 AM EDT
MTU and Argonne engineers improve signal processing for smaller fiber optic cables
Michigan Technological University

Small circuits can go the distance. Researchers at Michigan Tech have mapped a noise-reducing magneto-optical response that occurs in fiber-optic communications, opening the door for new materials technologies.

Newswise: PPPL physicist Hutch Neilson receives award for decades of leadership on national and international fusion experiments
Released: 16-Sep-2020 11:25 AM EDT
PPPL physicist Hutch Neilson receives award for decades of leadership on national and international fusion experiments
Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Hutch Neilson, a physicist at PPPL who is head of ITER Projects, has received the 2020 Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers’ (IEEE) Nuclear & Plasma Sciences Society (NPSS) Merit Award for decades of achievements, including collaborations with fusion experiments around the world from the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) stellarator in Germany to the international ITER experiment in the south of France.

Released: 16-Sep-2020 11:20 AM EDT
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Unveils BioMedical Laureates Program to Drive Diversity, Enhance Mentorship
Mount Sinai Health System

The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai today unveiled BioMedical Laureates at Mount Sinai, a program intended to increase diversity among its basic and clinical research faculty and reinforce the school’s strong ethic of mentorship. BioMedical Laureates and a companion program, Junior Laureates, will both launch in January, 2021, and will each announce new Laureates annually.

Newswise: PTAC Unanimously Recommends First Specialty-focused APM for a Chronic Condition to HHS Secretary for Consideration
Released: 16-Sep-2020 11:05 AM EDT
PTAC Unanimously Recommends First Specialty-focused APM for a Chronic Condition to HHS Secretary for Consideration
American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI)

The ACAAI PCACP model is a value-based care model that gives physicians specializing in asthma care the resources and flexibility they need to better diagnose and manage patients with asthma.

Newswise:Video Embedded a-white-dwarf-s-surprise-planetary-companion
VIDEO
Released: 16-Sep-2020 11:05 AM EDT
A White Dwarf’s Surprise Planetary Companion
NSF’s National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory

For the first time, an intact, giant exoplanet has been discovered orbiting close to a white dwarf star. This discovery shows that it is possible for Jupiter-sized planets to survive their star’s demise and settle into close orbits around the remaining stellar ember, near the habitable zone. This foretells one possible future for our own Solar System when the Sun ages into a white dwarf.

Newswise: Building bridges: PARP enzymes bring broken DNA together
Released: 16-Sep-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Building bridges: PARP enzymes bring broken DNA together
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

St. Jude researchers capture the structure of PARP enzymes at work, leading to a new understanding of DNA repair that may aid cancer treatments targeting the process.


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