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12-13-2018JianyiHipandKneeMED1810069_JN_JointReplacementInfographic_4-1.jpg

Article ID: 705283

Eligibility Criteria Unfairly Limit Minorities’ Access to Hip and Knee Replacement Surgeries

Johns Hopkins Medicine

In a study of medical records pulled from a national database, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers have found that underrepresented populations are less likely than others to be eligible for hip or knee replacement surgeries because they do not meet certain rigid—and in their opinion unfairly applied—hospital requirements for surgery, such as weight, blood sugar and tobacco use limits. Such cutoffs, say the researchers, designed to lower costs and in some cases complications, deny minority and lower income groups access to treatments that would improve their quality of life.

Released:
12-Dec-2018 10:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 705303

Media Advisory: Jhu Expert Available on Lab-Grown Meat

Johns Hopkins University

A company in Israel has unveiled the world’s first lab-grown steak, grown in a petri dish with the taste and texture of one that comes from a cow. Jan Dutkiewicz, a postdoctoral fellow in political science at Johns Hopkins University has researched the emergence of cellular agriculture. He is available to talk about the new steak and offer perspective on the development.

Released:
12-Dec-2018 9:40 AM EST
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Pop Culture

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Article ID: 705269

Revolutionary testing for food-supply safety and illicit drug use

Oregon State University, College of Engineering

Oregon State University College of Engineering researchers are developing novel lab-on-a-chip biosensors for testing food quality and safety as well as illicit drug use.

Released:
12-Dec-2018 9:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 705301

Seeing Small-Molecule Interactions Inside Cells (Video)

American Chemical Society (ACS)

Like people in a large company, proteins in cells constantly interact with each other to perform various jobs. To develop new disease therapies, researchers are trying to control these interactions with small-molecule drugs that cause specific proteins to associate more or less with their “coworkers.” Now, researchers reporting in ACS’ journal Analytical Chemistry have developed a method to visualize whether drugs are regulating protein–protein interactions inside cells.

Released:
12-Dec-2018 9:00 AM EST
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12-12-2018VanessaMMichosWeightHeart-1.jpg

Article ID: 705197

Your Weight History May Predict Your Heart Failure Risk

Johns Hopkins Medicine

In a medical records analysis of information gathered on more than 6,000 people, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers conclude that simply asking older adult patients about their weight history at ages 20 and 40 could provide real value to clinicians in their efforts to predict patients’ future risk of heart failure, heart attacks or strokes.

Released:
12-Dec-2018 9:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 705263

Fire’s effects on soil moisture, runoff

American Society of Agronomy (ASA), Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), Soil Science Society of America (SSSA)

The 2011 Las Conchas mega-fire in New Mexico burned more than 150,000 acres and threatened the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Now, using data from the fire, researchers at Los Alamos have created an experimental model that will help us better understand the interactions of fire and water in the soil.

Released:
12-Dec-2018 9:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 705254

‘Eavesdropping’ on Groupers’ Mating Calls Key to Survival

Florida Atlantic University

Many fish produce sounds for courtship and mating, navigation, and defending their territories. Scientists analyze these sounds to study their behavior such as reproduction. Since grouper spawning is brief and it takes them a long time to reach sexual maturity, they are vulnerable to overfishing. “Eavesdropping” on them is key to their survival. Researchers have developed a novel acoustic monitoring technique to classify grouper species by their sounds or “grouper calls,” with accuracy of about 90 percent.

Released:
12-Dec-2018 9:00 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    12-Dec-2018 9:00 AM EST

Article ID: 705294

The Epoch of Planet Formation, Times Twenty

National Radio Astronomy Observatory

ALMA has yielded stunning, high-resolution images of 20 nearby protoplanetary disks and given astronomers new insights into the variety of features they contain and the speed with which planets can emerge.

Released:
11-Dec-2018 9:00 PM EST
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Article ID: 705271

Lowest-Priced Generic Drugs More Likely to Experience Shortages

ISPOR—The Professional Society for Health Economics and Outcomes Research

Value in Health, the official journal of ISPOR, announced today the publication of new research showing that the lowest priced generic drugs are at a substantially elevated risk of experiencing a drug shortage, and that periods of drug shortages are associated with only modest increases in drug prices.

Released:
12-Dec-2018 8:05 AM EST
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12-12-2018RachelIBBSAnnounment.jpg

Article ID: 705187

Institute For Basic Biomedical Sciences at Johns Hopkins Announces New Leadership Positions

Johns Hopkins Medicine

The Institute for Basic Biomedical Sciences at Johns Hopkins has named three new leaders within its ranks to strengthen opportunities for faculty development, build connections with scientists in clinical-based departments and represent basic science interests among the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine’s Research Council.

Released:
12-Dec-2018 8:00 AM EST
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