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10-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Patients with Selected Voice Disorders Are Subject to Psychiatric Problems
American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

Psychological factors including personality traits and psychiatric illness may be causally related to voice disorders or may be a consequence of vocal dysfunction. Failure to recognize coexistent psychopathology may result not only in errors in voice diagnosis, but may delay treatment and impair long-term cure rates.

10-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty Does Not Cause Postoperative Nasality
American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) is a surgical procedure that is increasingly used in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. UPPP involves removal and tightening of redundant oropharyngeal tissue. Consequently, patients have concerns regarding the potential effect of procedure's effect upon voice and speech. The limited data on the effect of UPPP upon voice is a key reason that a group of Pennsylvania medical researchers set out to assess if hypernasality of voice is a potential complication of UPPP for obstructive sleep apnea.

10-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Exposure to Inorganic Mercury and Noise and Auditory Pathway Dysfunction
American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

The Brazilian government has recently responded to an energy crisis and risk of blackouts by imposing a general reduction of 20 percent in power consumption. The public has increased its use of fluorescent light bulbs versus conventional high energy consuming lamps. A group of medical researchers from that nation's leading medical schools is now warning that neither the industry nor the population are aware of the health risks involved with improper handling or dropping of fluorescent light bulbs that contain mercury. They believe accidental intoxication with mercury vapors may become a public health concern.

10-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Balance Disorders and Patients with Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in One Ear
American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

Israeli researchers set out to evaluate the effect of impulse and impact noise on the vestibular labyrinth both in subjects with symmetrical NIHL and in subjects with asymmetrical NIHL in which the frequencies below 3000 Hz were also affected. Using members of the Israeli Defense Force as test subjects, they examined the correlation between the subjects' complaints of dizziness and vertigo and the results of the vestibular function tests, and the correlation between the severity of the hearing loss and the vestibular symptomatology and pathology.

10-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Follow-up Study on Effectiveness of Injection Snoreplasty
American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

Last year, researchers from Walter Reed Army Medical Center introduced an experimental procedure called Injection Snoreplasty. The procedure, performed in an otolaryngologist's office, involves the injection of a sclerotherapy agent used to treat varicose veins into the soft palate. Their conclusions labeled injection snoreplasty inexpensive and less painful than traditional surgical procedures used to reduce snoring. The authors now present their 18-24 month follow-up results.

10-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Researchers Confirm the Association Between Sleepiness and Auto Accidents
American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

Two years ago, a research team released the study, "A Comparative Model: Reaction Time Performance in Sleep Disordered Breathing Versus Alcohol Impaired Controls," at the American Academy of Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery Annual Meeting. It stated that driving or engaging in safety-sensitive activities while sleepy might be as dangerous as driving under the influence of alcohol. Subsequently, Dr. Powell and "Dateline" NBC news joined together to conduct one of the largest surveys on this topic to determine an association of sleepiness and sleep-disorders to motor vehicle accidents and injury.

10-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Children can have Tonsillectomy and Adenoidectomy Surgery with Little Risk
American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

An outpatient approach to tonsillectomy and/or adenoidectomy (T &/or A) is not unique. A group of ear, nose, and throat specialists with access to an inpatient pediatric unit, have maintained an outpatient approach for all their patients having T &/or A, whether they have obstructive sleep apnea or not. In order to evaluate an outpatient approach, they began in 1996 to study all children undergoing T&/or A at their single outpatient facility.

10-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Testing Elevated High-Frequency Noise Levels Provides an Indicator of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss
American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is insidious in onset, not currently treatable and extremely common. Musicians believe that long-term exposure to high frequency sounds has resulted in long-term damage to their hearing. Now, two medical researchers from Scotland have demonstrated that NIHL may be detectable at an earlier stage by measuring extended high frequency thresholds.

10-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Laser-Assisted Myringotomy Effective for Short-Term Relief of Otitis Media
American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

The debate continues regarding the efficacy of OtoLAM. Researchers from several medical facilities in New York set out to evaluate the role of OtoLAM in the treatment of middle ear disease -- specifically, acute otitis media, otitis media with effusion, and eustachian tube dysfunction -- in the general population.

10-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Follow-Up Reveals Pediatric Cochlear Implantation is Safe and Effective
American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

A group of experts in cochlear implantation set out to determine the long-term consequences in providing this device to deaf children. They have found the fears regarding device degradation are unfounded and that cochlear implantation results in real benefits to language and communication skills.

10-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Collagen Injections Aid Parkinson's Patients with Hypophonia
American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

Of the nearly two million Americans who suffer from idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD), nearly a third will cite voice or speech abnormalities as the most debilitating consequence. Percutaneous laryngeal collagen augmentation for Parkinsonian hypophonia and glottic incompetence in elderly patients seems ideal because of the procedure's ease, lack of complications, and the avoidance of risk of anesthesia.

10-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Cochlear Implantation Will Benefit the Hiv-Positive Child
American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

A team of hearing experts has examined the case of a nine year old, HIV-infected child undergoing cochlear implantation. Their findings represent the first case of cochlear implantation in an HIV infected individual presented in the literature.

10-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Ear, Nose, and Throat Symptoms Run Rampant in Hospital Wards
American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

An inpatient hospital stay can highlight or exacerbate existing ear, nose, and throat disorders, even when the reason for admittance is for other medical probems. Accordingly, New York otolaryngologists set out to heighten awareness of ear, nose, and throat disorders that can be associated with specific risk factors present in a hospital environment.

10-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Surgeries for Sleep Apnea, Sinusitis, Can Have a Positive Impact
American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

Previous studies have been undertaken to assess the impact of upper airway surgery on the voice. However, these studies have generally been limited in scope or sample size. Now, a team of New York researchers has assessed acoustic characteristics, including relative formant amplitude, in a larger group of patients before and after upper airway surgery.

10-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Upper Airway Disorders and Inflammatory Bowel Disease Linked
American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

Medical researchers have determined a rare association between inflammatory bowel disease and obstructing upper airway inflammation. They have observed how symptoms of obstructing laryngotracheitis (inflammation of the trachea and larynx) may present along with the more typical bowel symptoms of ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease.

Released: 8-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Chandra Team Discovers X-Ray Burst, Pulses in Exploded Star
University of Arizona

Astronomers using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory have discovered a burst of X-rays and cyclical pulsing from a white dwarf star that has just undergone a thermonuclear explosion.

Released: 8-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
In Pursuit of Equal Justice
Equal Justice Works

"This summer I found poverty in rural America, and it grabbed me by the shoulders and shouted at me." Those are the words Ian H. Thomson, now a second-year law student at Brigham Young University, used to describe his summer public interest law internship with the Migrant Farmworker Law Unit of Idaho Legal Aid Services, Inc.

Released: 8-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
International Debt Relief at Risk
University of Maryland, College Park

Current efforts to help the poorest nations deal with their crushing international debt may never benefit the poor, says University of Maryland political economist. Instead, the windfall - more than $20 billion in relief granted by the World Bank and International Monetary Fund - will likely get sucked up by corrupt and inefficient governments.

Released: 8-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Weekly Story Ideas for 09-07-01
Temple University

1) Bush faces challenges on immigration issues. 2) Temple leads the way for people with disabilities. 3) Microsoft decision promotes competition. 4) Factors to fight the "freshman 15."

Released: 8-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
New Paperback Offers Tips on Report Writing
Cornell University

New book focuses on how to write reports. Guide to Report Writing (Prentice-Hall, 2001) is co-authored by a senior lecturer who teaches managerial communication in the School of Hotel Administration at Cornell University.

Released: 8-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Baclofen Pump Effective
University of Alabama at Birmingham

UAB researchers have found that continuous infusion of the drug Baclofen directly to the spine can reduce spastic hypertonia -- involuntary, abnormal muscle movements common to patients following a stroke.

Released: 8-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Work Teams Score
University of Alabama at Birmingham

Businesses spend thousands of dollars and man hours each year creating work teams, which can consist of individuals working on a project, employees who work together to create a product or service, or can be as general as a department.

Released: 8-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Understanding the Car Thief
University of Alabama at Birmingham

According to the FBI, car theft is a $7.5 billion business.

Released: 8-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Guidelines Help Reduce Length of Stay
University of Alabama at Birmingham

Daily guidelines of care for those who undergo lung surgery can significantly reduce a patient's length of stay in the hospital and increase quality of care and patient satisfaction.

Released: 8-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Suit up for Safety
University of Alabama at Birmingham

When young quarterbacks and wide receivers are running for the end zone, make sure it's not their teeth that are getting tackled.

Released: 8-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
A Greener Planetary Greenhouse
NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

In recent years Earth-orbiting satellites have seen plants growing more vigorously than usual over northern parts of our planet.

Released: 8-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Bizarre Boiling
NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

Watching liquids boil in low gravity is an out-of-this-world experience (in this story you can see for yourself).

Released: 8-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Colgate-Palmolive Selects Mayo Clinic Health Management Resources
Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic today announced that it will enhance Colgate-Palmolive Company's U.S. employee benefits package with services from Mayo Clinic Health management Resources.

Released: 8-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Scientific News You Can Use in Allergy, Asthma and Immunology
American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI)

Physicians, researchers and international experts will present "Scientific News You Can Use," on asthma, other allergic and immunologic diseases -- conditions that afflict more than 50 million Americans -- Nov. 16-20 in Orlando.

Released: 8-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Purdue Launches Discovery Park, Nanotechnology Center
Purdue University

Purdue University today (Friday, 9/7) announced it will build a $100 million Discovery Park that will include a nanotechnology center, a bioscience / engineering center, an e-enterprises center and a center for entrepreneurship.

Released: 8-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Vigorous and Greener Vegetation Growth in Northern Hemisphere
Boston University

Researchers from Boston University and NASA have recently discovered that parts of the northern hemisphere have become much greener and the growing season has increased over the past 21 years.

Released: 8-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
NPF Seeks Grant Applications for Psoriasis Research
National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF)

The National Psoriasis Foundation announced today that it is accepting grant applications from researchers interested in innovative psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis research projects in clinical research, genetics or immunology.

Released: 8-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
NPF Offers Postdoctoral Fellowship in Psoriasis Genetics Research
National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF)

The National Psoriasis Foundation announced today that it is accepting applications for a two-year postdoctoral fellowship for an early-career researcher in the field of psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis genetics.

Released: 8-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Geisinger Pediatrician Applauds Academy's Recommended Ban on Infant Walkers
Dick Jones Communications

The American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Injury and Poison Prevention recommended a ban on the manufacture and sale of mobile infant walkers this week. Dr. Robert Cordes, a pediatrician for the Geisinger Health System, believes it's about time.

Released: 8-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Six Million Ancient Nile Valley Artifacts Going to the British Museum
Southern Methodist University

More than 6 million ancient Nile Valley artifacts collected by an SMU anthropology professor will be added to the collections of the British Museum in London.

Released: 7-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Can Students Learn -and Like - Biology? Yes, If...
American Physiological Society (APS)

Effective techniques for teaching science are among the current research highlights published by the American Physiological Society.

Released: 7-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Influence of Genetics and Hormones on Human Physiology Focus of October Conference
American Physiological Society (APS)

There is a growing need to understand how genetics and hormones influence human physiology. For the first time ever, experts in genetics, molecular biology, pharmacology, integrative physiology and clinical medicine will meet to assess genetic influences on responses to sex steroids.

Released: 7-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Bringing Responsible Tourism to Jordan
University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

Opening an archeological site to the public can lead to vandalism and destruction, but a new plan from the Univ. of Arkansas and Yarmouk University may help preserve Jordan's rich cultural heritage by bringing millions of people to see it each year.

Released: 7-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Cell-Cell Communication in the Flower Is Unlocked
Cornell University

Familiarity breeds contempt. Nonfamiliarity produces seed. Just as humans have a natural aversion toward marrying kin, some food crop plants have genes that allow them to avoid being fertilized by "self-related" pollen, Cornell biologists say.

Released: 7-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Equal Justice Works
Equal Justice Works

Two days of exciting opportunities, career networking and public interest inspiration await the nearly 2,000 law students, lawyers, employers, law school administrators and justice advocates expected to attend the 2001 National Association for Public Interest Law (NAPIL) Career Fair and Awards Dinner on October 26 and 27 in Washington, DC.

Released: 7-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
FSU Pilot Project Cuts Low Algebra Grades in Half
Florida State University

In the "old days" of math education, college algebra students would attend classes where math problems were worked on chalkboards, all too often making the students passive observers of what was being taught. But a two-year pilot program at Florida State University has changed the way students learn and prepare for tests, and has improved test scores in the process.

Released: 7-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Chances of Recession Dim Despite Severe Inventory Cuts
Wake Forest University Babcock Graduate School of Management

A Wake Forest University professor says a recession appears increasingly unlikely after inventory reductions of $65.5 billion during the first half of 2001 failed to drive the nation's gross domestic product growth into negative territory.

Released: 7-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Purdue Names Dean of Engineering Schools
Purdue University

Linda P. Katehi, associate dean for academic affairs in the University of Michigan College of Engineering, has been named dean of Purdue University's Schools of Engineering.

Released: 7-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
ORNL Heads Effort to Build Better Supercomputer Centers
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Supercomputers provide researchers with powerful tools, but operating them can also be a super hassle, says an Oak Ridge National Laboratory researcher who heads a team working to fix the problem.

Released: 7-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Researchers Find an Antibody that Destroys the Blood's Platelets
NYU Langone Health

New York University School of Medicine researchers have found, for the first time, an antibody that destroys an essential component of the blood called platelets. The novel finding may open new therapeutic avenues to treating a blood platelet disorder associated with HIV infection, and other types of vascular disease, including blood clots in arteries.

Released: 7-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Computer-Aided Detection for Breast Imaging Now Available
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Radiologists at Memorial-Sloan Kettering Cancer Center are using computer-aided detection to second-read mammograms at the Center's Breast Examination Center of Harlem. The technology uses a computer to scan mammograms for abnormalities and may improve early detection of breast cancer with screening mammography by almost 20 percent.

Released: 7-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Economy Ready to Rebound; Inflation, Restructuring Threaten Stability
Conference Board

The U.S. economy will rebound in the second half of the year and generate GDP growth of 3.2% next year, but weak profits and inflationary pressures are becoming growing worries, The Conference Board reports today in its latest economic forecast.

Released: 7-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Love of Animals Inspires $18.4 Million Gift to WVU
West Virginia University - Eberly College of Arts and Sciences

Two Morgantown sisters devoted to their pets and the care of animals gave their life savings -- an astounding $18.4 million -- to West Virginia University, officials announced Tuesday.

Released: 7-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Researchers Develop Monitoring System for Roads, Waterways
University of Rhode Island

A team of ocean engineers has developed an environmental monitoring and forecasting system that provides information about conditions on highways and waterways.

Released: 7-Sep-2001 12:00 AM EDT
Disabled Activism Growing
University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

A new nationwide study reveals why more and more young disabled people are becoming politically involved and shows the best way of promoting activism in the disability community.


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