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Newswise: The Problem with Microwaving Tea
3-Aug-2020 3:15 PM EDT
The Problem with Microwaving Tea
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Through convection, as the liquid toward the bottom of a container warms up, it becomes less dense and moves to the top, allowing a cooler section of the liquid to contact the heating source. This ultimately results in a uniform temperature throughout the container. Inside a microwave, however, the electric field acting as the heating source exists everywhere and the convection process does not occur. Researchers studied this nonuniform heating behavior and present a solution in AIP Advances.

Newswise: Droplet Spread from Humans Doesn’t Always Follow Airflow
31-Jul-2020 3:15 PM EDT
Droplet Spread from Humans Doesn’t Always Follow Airflow
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

If aerosol transmission of COVID-19 is confirmed to be significant, as suspected, we will need to reconsider guidelines on social distancing, ventilation systems and shared spaces. Researchers in the U.K. believe a better understanding of different droplet behaviors and their different dispersion mechanisms is also needed. In Physics of Fluids, the group presents a model that demarcates differently sized droplets. This has implications for understanding the spread of airborne diseases, because the dispersion tests revealed the absence of intermediate-sized droplets.

Newswise: Nanostructures Modeled on Moth Eyes Effective for Anti-Icing
31-Jul-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Nanostructures Modeled on Moth Eyes Effective for Anti-Icing
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Researchers have been working for decades on improving the anti-icing performance of functional surfaces and work published in AIP Advances investigates a unique nanostructure, modeled on moth eyes, that has anti-icing properties. Moth eyes are of interest because they have a distinct ice-phobic and transparent surface. The researchers fabricated the moth eye nanostructure on a quartz substrate that was covered with a paraffin layer to isolate it from a cold and humid environment.

30-Jul-2020 10:10 AM EDT
Brace yourself: Novel experiment isolates genes that cause some people to gain muscle while others don’t
McMaster University

Researchers studying the mystery of why some weightlifters’ muscles grow much more quickly than others’ have found new answers through a novel experiment in which subjects worked out one leg and immobilized the other.

Newswise: HIIT programs show benefits for those with Down syndrome
Released: 4-Aug-2020 10:50 AM EDT
HIIT programs show benefits for those with Down syndrome
University of Georgia

Incorporating high-intensity interval training into exercise programs for individuals with Down syndrome may help achieve critical health outcomes in a more time-efficient manner, according to an article written by researchers at the University of Georgia and Kennesaw State University.

Released: 4-Aug-2020 10:15 AM EDT
VLBA Finds Planet Orbiting Small, Cool Star
National Radio Astronomy Observatory

Precision measurements made with the VLBA have revealed that a small, cool star 35 light-years from Earth is orbited by a Saturn-sized planet once every 221 days.

Released: 4-Aug-2020 10:05 AM EDT
Oklahoma Opts Out of Physician Supervision of CRNAs
American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA)

Oklahoma is now the 19th state to opt out from federal regulations that require physician supervision of Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs). The governors of 18 states and Guam have exercised such exemptions prior to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services’ (CMS) suspension for all states during the COVID-19 health crisis.

Newswise: Researchers develop new mouse model for SARS-CoV-2
Released: 4-Aug-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Researchers develop new mouse model for SARS-CoV-2
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at Yale University School of Medicine have developed a new mouse model to study SARS-CoV-2 infection and disease and to accelerate testing of novel treatments and vaccines against the novel coronavirus. The study, published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), also suggests that, rather than protecting the lungs, key antiviral signaling proteins may actually cause much of the tissue damage associated with COVID-19.

Newswise: Exposure to common cold coronaviruses can teach the immune system to recognize SARS-CoV-2
Released: 4-Aug-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Exposure to common cold coronaviruses can teach the immune system to recognize SARS-CoV-2
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

A new study led by scientists at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) shows that memory helper T cells that recognize common cold coronaviruses also recognize matching sites on SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

Newswise: Dr. Ted Parsons Named 2020-2021 President for The American Orthopaedic Association
Released: 4-Aug-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Dr. Ted Parsons Named 2020-2021 President for The American Orthopaedic Association
Henry Ford Health System

DETROIT – Ted Parsons, M.D., chair of the Department of Orthopedics at Henry Ford Health System, was named 2020-2021 president of The American Orthopaedic Association (AOA) at the annual leadership virtual meeting held in June.First elected to the AOA’s Presidential Line in 2018, Dr. Parsons has been active in leading committees in planning a range of the AOA’s leadership education programs.

Released: 4-Aug-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Rush University Medical Center and the Family Larsson-Rosenquist Foundation unveil open access, evidence-based PROVIDE Training Compendium to help healthcare professionals bring lifesaving mothers’ own milk to infants in intensive care
Rush University Medical Center

Rush University Medical Center, supported by the Family Larsson-Rosenquist Foundation, has produced a series of educational videos and mother-focused information sheets to train healthcare professionals in mothers’ own milk (MOM) feeding practices in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) worldwide.

Released: 4-Aug-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Mount Sinai Medical Legal Partnership Names Executive Director
Mount Sinai Health System

The Mount Sinai Medical Legal Partnership (MSMLP) has appointed Allison Charney as its Executive Director. Ms. Charney was a founding member of the MSMLP and has been Co-Chair of the Board of Directors since its inception in 2014.

Newswise: 238716_web.jpg
Released: 4-Aug-2020 9:50 AM EDT
Arrhythmia-free survival is indeed survival of the fittest
Elsevier

In a new study, investigators report that patients undergoing atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation, who are physically fit before the procedure, have a much higher chance of benefiting from the procedure and remaining in normal sinus rhythm.

Newswise: Steven Grossman, MD, PhD, named cancer physician in chief of USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center
Released: 4-Aug-2020 9:35 AM EDT
Steven Grossman, MD, PhD, named cancer physician in chief of USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center
Keck Medicine of USC

Steven Grossman, MD, PhD, named cancer physician in chief of USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center

Newswise: sara_c_.jpg
Released: 4-Aug-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Consumers don’t fully trust smart home technologies
University of Warwick

Smart home technologies are an emerging market, with some households installing voice controlled appliances and smart security

Newswise: European Heart Journal: Cell Infusions Benefit Heart Patients
Released: 4-Aug-2020 9:00 AM EDT
European Heart Journal: Cell Infusions Benefit Heart Patients
Cedars-Sinai

Three years after the ALLSTAR clinical trial ended prematurely, the study's data shows that treatments of cardiosphere-derived cells -- the same cells used as an experimental therapy tested in COVID-19 patients -- demonstrated unexpected promise in heart attack survivors. Downloadable video available.

Released: 4-Aug-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Mount Sinai Researchers Discover Treatment Option for Rare Genetic Disorder
Mount Sinai Health System

Researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine used a novel genetic sequencing technology to identify the genetic cause of—and a treatment for—a previously unknown severe auto inflammatory syndrome affecting an 18-year-old girl since infancy.

Newswise: Jersey Shore University Medical Center’s Dr. Aikman Recognized as a Quality Improvement Leader
Released: 4-Aug-2020 8:40 AM EDT
Jersey Shore University Medical Center’s Dr. Aikman Recognized as a Quality Improvement Leader
Hackensack Meridian Health

United Hospital Fund (UHF) honored Hackensack Meridian Jersey Shore University Medical Center’s Residency Program Director for Obstetrics & Gynecology Noelle M. Aikman, M.D., FACOG, of Brick, NJ, as a quality improvement leader during its second annual Tribute to Excellence in Health Care event in July.

Newswise: Between shark and ray: The evolutionary advantage of the sea angels
Released: 4-Aug-2020 8:35 AM EDT
Between shark and ray: The evolutionary advantage of the sea angels
University of Vienna

Angel sharks are sharks, but with their peculiarly flat body they rather resemble rays. An international research team led by Faviel A. López-Romero and Jürgen Kriwet of the Institute of Palaeontology has now investigated the origin of this body shape. The results illustrate how these sharks evolved into highly specialised, exclusively bottom-dwelling ambush predators and thus also contribute to a better understanding of their threat from environmental changes.

Newswise: Dolphin Calf Entangled in Fishing Line Only Lived Two Years Following Rescue
Released: 4-Aug-2020 8:30 AM EDT
Dolphin Calf Entangled in Fishing Line Only Lived Two Years Following Rescue
Florida Atlantic University

Researchers examined the outcome of an entangled bottlenose dolphin calf with monofilament fishing line wrapped tightly around its upper jaw. It was successfully disentangled and immediately released it back into its natural habitat. Surviving only two years, results showed long-term severe damage due to this entanglement including emaciation. There are about 1,000 bottlenose dolphins that live in the Indian River Lagoon, which also is a very popular location for recreational fishing.

Newswise: Seven Hackensack Meridian Health Cancer Treatment Centers Now Offering Innovative Scalp Cooling Treatment to Prevent Hair Loss from Chemotherapy
Released: 4-Aug-2020 8:10 AM EDT
Seven Hackensack Meridian Health Cancer Treatment Centers Now Offering Innovative Scalp Cooling Treatment to Prevent Hair Loss from Chemotherapy
Hackensack Meridian Health

Hair loss during chemotherapy — also called chemotherapy-induced alopecia — is a common side effect that can have a negative emotional and psychological impact, resulting in depression, stress, loss of self-esteem and loss of privacy. Fear of hair loss can also cause some patients to reject chemotherapy treatment. The Paxman Scalp Cooling System can help.

Newswise: Why Is Stroke So Deadly for People of African Descent?
Released: 4-Aug-2020 8:05 AM EDT
Why Is Stroke So Deadly for People of African Descent?
University of Virginia Health System

An international team of scientists has completed the largest analysis of stroke-risk genes ever undertaken in people of African descent.

Released: 4-Aug-2020 7:00 AM EDT
High-fat Diet and Genetics Lead to Anxiety and Depression in Rats
American Physiological Society (APS)

New research in a genetically diverse rat strain finds high-fat diet and genetics together increase anxiety and depression-like behavior in addition to negatively affecting metabolic health. The study is published ahead of print in Physiological Genomics.

Newswise: New Editors-in-Chief Appointed for ISPOR’s Value & Outcomes Spotlight Magazine
Released: 4-Aug-2020 6:30 AM EDT
New Editors-in-Chief Appointed for ISPOR’s Value & Outcomes Spotlight Magazine
ISPOR—The Professional Society for Health Economics and Outcomes Research

ISPOR, the professional society for health economics and outcomes research (HEOR), announced the appointment of 2 new Editors-in-Chief for its HEOR news magazine, Value & Outcomes Spotlight.

Newswise: Compressive shearing forces may jumpstart life on rocky moons and planets
Released: 4-Aug-2020 6:05 AM EDT
Compressive shearing forces may jumpstart life on rocky moons and planets
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Massive compressive shearing forces generated by the tidal pull of Jupiter-like planets on their rocky ice-covered moons may form a natural reactor that drives simple amino acids to polymerize into larger compounds. These extreme mechanical forces strongly enhance molecule condensation reactions, opening a new arena of possibilities for the chemical origins of life on Earth and other rock planets, according to new research from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

Newswise: Penn Medicine Receives $4.9 Million Grant to Improve Uptake of Cancer Care Best Practices
Released: 4-Aug-2020 12:05 AM EDT
Penn Medicine Receives $4.9 Million Grant to Improve Uptake of Cancer Care Best Practices
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

A new grant awarded to the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania will help identify methods to improve uptake of state-of-the-science care that can have a significant impact for patients.

Newswise: 35-second scan could pick the next sporting champion
Released: 3-Aug-2020 9:05 PM EDT
35-second scan could pick the next sporting champion
University of South Australia

How hard is it to pick the next Usain Bolt, Ian Thorpe or Anna Meares? Finding a world champion often falls to talent scouts and involves years of hard work, but could it be as simple as a 35-second body scan?

Newswise:Video Embedded protocol-needed-to-monitor-covid-19-disease-course
VIDEO
Released: 3-Aug-2020 9:05 PM EDT
Protocol needed to monitor COVID-19 disease course
University of Washington School of Medicine and UW Medicine

Patients with underlying conditions such as asthma or other lung problems should be checked on regularly by pulmonologists or primary-care doctors for at least six months. Some will need to be monitored for one to three years, according to a new opinion piece posted online today in The Lancet-Respiratory Medicine.

Newswise:Video Embedded malignant-cancer-diagnosed-in-a-dinosaur-for-the-first-time
VIDEO
30-Jul-2020 9:55 AM EDT
Malignant Cancer Diagnosed in a Dinosaur for the First Time
McMaster University

A collaboration led by the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) and McMaster University has led to the discovery and diagnosis of an aggressive malignant bone cancer — an osteosarcoma — for the first time ever in a dinosaur. No malignant cancers (tumours that can spread throughout the body and have severe health implications) have ever been documented in dinosaurs previously. The paper was published August 3rd in the prestigious medical journal The Lancet Oncology.

Released: 3-Aug-2020 5:40 PM EDT
Nearly 70 Seattle Cancer Care Alliance Providers Named to “Top Doctors” List
Seattle Cancer Care Alliance

Seattle Met, a monthly magazine that reports on Seattle politics, arts and community, released its annual Top Doctors list today, featuring 68 Seattle Cancer Care Alliance (SCCA) doctors, physician assistants and nurse practitioners.

3-Aug-2020 4:00 PM EDT
Immunization Programs Yield High "Return on Investment," Saving Hundreds of Billions of Dollars
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Immunization programs offered in low- and middle-income countries provide a high “return on investment” in terms of the economic costs of diseases that are prevented and the values of lives that would have been lost.

Newswise: 239149_web.jpg
Released: 3-Aug-2020 3:40 PM EDT
Dingoes have gotten bigger over the last 80 years - and pesticides might be to blame
University of New South Wales

Dingoes have gotten around 6-9 per cent bigger over the past 80 years, new research from UNSW and the University of Sydney shows - but the growth is only happening in areas where poison baiting is used.

Newswise: Inhibiting Enzyme Helps Cancer Immunotherapy Work Better
Released: 3-Aug-2020 3:25 PM EDT
Inhibiting Enzyme Helps Cancer Immunotherapy Work Better
University of California San Diego Health

UC San Diego researchers discovered that people with an inactive RNA-editing enzyme respond better to cancer immunotherapy, and inhibitors of the enzyme help mice with difficult-to-treat cancers live longer.

Released: 3-Aug-2020 3:25 PM EDT
UCI engineers evaluate snow drought in different parts of the world
University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., Aug. 3, 2020 — Environmental engineers at the University of California, Irvine have developed a new framework for characterizing snow droughts around the world. Using this tool to analyze conditions from 1980 to 2018, the researchers found a 28-percent increase in the length of intensified snow-water deficits in the Western United States during the second half of the study period.

Released: 3-Aug-2020 3:15 PM EDT
DHS S&T, DOT Select University of Illinois-Led Consortium to Research Interoperability for 911 Public Safety Comms
Homeland Security's Science And Technology Directorate

DHS S&T, in partnership with DOT, has selected the CIRI, a DHS COE led by the UIUC, to develop a framework and process for testing the interoperability and compatibility of Next Generation 911 (NG911) systems.

Newswise: UM Cardiology Researchers Studying How COVID-19 Affects the Heart
Released: 3-Aug-2020 3:10 PM EDT
UM Cardiology Researchers Studying How COVID-19 Affects the Heart
University of Miami Health System, Miller School of Medicine

COVID-19 is shown to impact the heart and, in some cases, have long-lasting cardiac effects. To discover the extent to which COVID-19 affects the heart, cardiologists and researchers with the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine have begun multiple studies.

Released: 3-Aug-2020 3:10 PM EDT
DHS Awards $1.97M to Small Businesses for First Responder ICAM Technolo
Homeland Security's Science And Technology Directorate

DHS SBIR Program awarded a total of $1.97 million to two small businesses to develop technologies that will support the security, scalability, and interoperability within a first responder organization’s information technology infrastructure.

Newswise: Strong relationships in adulthood won’t ‘fix’ effects of early childhood adversity
Released: 3-Aug-2020 3:10 PM EDT
Strong relationships in adulthood won’t ‘fix’ effects of early childhood adversity
University of Notre Dame

Harsh conditions in early life are a fundamental cause of adult stress, and according to new research from the University of Notre Dame on wild baboons, this effect is not explained by a lack of social support in adulthood.

Newswise: Tackling the Bioethics Challenges Raised by COVID-19
Released: 3-Aug-2020 3:05 PM EDT
Tackling the Bioethics Challenges Raised by COVID-19
University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing

The diverse situations experienced by health-care workers during the COVID-19 pandemic often present serious ethical challenges. From the allocation of resources and triage protocols to health-care worker and patient rights and the management of clinical trials, new ethical questions have come to the forefront of today’s global public health emergency.


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