Latest News

Filters close
Newswise: U.S. Seafood Industry Flounders Due to COVID-19
17-Nov-2020 9:50 AM EST
U.S. Seafood Industry Flounders Due to COVID-19
University of Vermont

The pandemic is putting a hurt on the seafood industry, finds the largest study of COVID on U.S. fisheries, which suggests that American fishmongers may flounder - or go belly up - without more government aid. -Monthly fresh seafood exports declined up to 43% -Monthly imports fell up to 37% -Catches dropped 40% some months. Over the first six months of 2020: -Total U.S. seafood exports are down 20% -Imports are down 6% -Further losses are likely as restrictions increase to address COVID-19.

Released: 23-Nov-2020 9:40 AM EST
Wake Forest Baptist Health Receives Grant to Improve Access to Cancer Clinical Trials for Underserved, Rural Populations
Wake Forest Baptist Health

Despite advances in cancer treatment, disparities in cancer outcomes are prevalent, especially for minority, underserved and rural populations. With a $775,000 one-year grant from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), researchers at Wake Forest Baptist’s Comprehensive Cancer Center are working to reduce those disparities.

Newswise: Researchers join $10 million project to understand sex differences in brain cancer outcomes
Released: 23-Nov-2020 9:35 AM EST
Researchers join $10 million project to understand sex differences in brain cancer outcomes
Penn State College of Medicine

Researchers from Penn State College of Medicine are participating in a $10 million project to better understand why males and females have different survival rates with a common and deadly type of brain cancer.

Newswise: Healthy Monday Spotlights …. Diabetes Prevention
Released: 23-Nov-2020 9:00 AM EST
Healthy Monday Spotlights …. Diabetes Prevention
Monday Campaigns

This article aims to shed light on behaviors and practices that can make a difference on our health. Small steps are key.

Newswise: Coriell Life Sciences Wins Two Prestigious Industry Awards
Released: 23-Nov-2020 9:00 AM EST
Coriell Life Sciences Wins Two Prestigious Industry Awards
Coriell Life Sciences

Coriell Life Sciences, a trusted and innovative precision medicine organization, is honored to accept two industry awards: EHIR's Fall 2020 Traction Award Healthcare Tech Outlook's Top Precision Medicine Providers in Europe

Newswise: Quantum X-ray Microscope Underway at Brookhaven Lab
Released: 23-Nov-2020 9:00 AM EST
Quantum X-ray Microscope Underway at Brookhaven Lab
Brookhaven National Laboratory

UPTON, NY—Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory have begun building a quantum-enhanced x-ray microscope at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II). This groundbreaking microscope, supported by the Biological and Environmental Research progam at DOE’s Office of Science, will enable researchers to image biomolecules like never before.

Newswise: cnta_press_release_images-1.jpg
Released: 23-Nov-2020 8:10 AM EST
Breakthrough in studying the enzyme that ultimately produces fish odour syndrome
University of Warwick

The condition trimethylaminuria, is more commonly known as fish odour syndrome, it currently has no cure.

Newswise: Solving for nuclear structure in light nuclei
Released: 23-Nov-2020 8:05 AM EST
Solving for nuclear structure in light nuclei
Washington University in St. Louis

The dense region at the center of an atom is a place where scientists can test their understanding of the fundamental interactions. A recent publication contributes to a body of increasingly accurate, descriptive calculations of nuclear structure and reactions.

Newswise:Video Embedded secrets-of-the-lost-crops-revealed-where-bisonnbsp-roam
VIDEO
Released: 23-Nov-2020 8:05 AM EST
Secrets of the ‘lost crops’ revealed where bison roam
Washington University in St. Louis

Blame it on the bison. If not for the wooly, boulder-sized beasts that once roamed North America in vast herds, ancient people might have looked past the little barley that grew under those thundering hooves. But the people soon came to rely on little barley and other small-seeded native plants as staple food.

Newswise: Darwin’s handwritten pages from On the Origin of Species go online for the first time
Released: 23-Nov-2020 8:00 AM EST
Darwin’s handwritten pages from On the Origin of Species go online for the first time
National University of Singapore

Two original pages from the handwritten draft of Darwin’s On the Origin of Species, along with rare letters, and never-before-seen reading notes have been added to Darwin Online. This scholarly portal dedicated to naturalist Charles Darwin was founded by Dr John van Wyhe from the National University of Singapore’s (NUS) Department of Biological Sciences, and Tembusu College.

Released: 23-Nov-2020 7:55 AM EST
CODA Appendicitis Trial Shows the Risks and Benefits of Treating Appendicitis with Antibiotics Instead of Surgery
Rush University Medical Center

Antibiotics may be a good treatment choice for some appendicitis patients, according to early results from the Comparing Outcomes of antibiotic Drugs and Appendectomy (CODA) trial reported in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Released: 23-Nov-2020 7:00 AM EST
Quick, Frequent Exercise Breaks Improve Blood Vessel Health in Type 2 Diabetes
American Physiological Society (APS)

Frequent exercise breaks during prolonged sitting may be better for blood vessel health in people with type 2 diabetes than less-frequent activity interruptions. The first-of-its-kind study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology-Heart and Circulatory Physiology.

Newswise: COVID-19 cases could nearly double before Biden takes office
20-Nov-2020 1:45 PM EST
COVID-19 cases could nearly double before Biden takes office
Washington University in St. Louis

President-elect Joe Biden has signaled that fighting the COVID-19 pandemic will be an immediate priority, but Inauguration Day is still two months away. Confirmed COVID-19 cases are likely to increase to 20 million by the end of January, predicts a Washington University in St. Louis forecasting model.

Newswise: Virtual ISPOR Europe 2020 Live Conference Concluded
Released: 23-Nov-2020 1:05 AM EST
Virtual ISPOR Europe 2020 Live Conference Concluded
ISPOR—The Professional Society for Health Economics and Outcomes Research

ISPOR—The Professional Society for Health Economics and Outcomes Research (HEOR) announced that the on demand version of its Virtual ISPOR Europe 2020 conference is now available to registrants through 31 December 2020. ISPOR Europe is the leading European conference for HEOR.

Newswise: Some Parents Prioritize Thanksgiving Traditions Over Reducing COVID-19 Risks
18-Nov-2020 9:45 AM EST
Some Parents Prioritize Thanksgiving Traditions Over Reducing COVID-19 Risks
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

One in three parents say the benefits of gathering with family for the holidays are worth the risk of spreading or getting the virus, according to the C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll on Children’s Health at Michigan Medicine.

Released: 22-Nov-2020 10:05 AM EST
U.S. Should Look at How Other High-Income Countries Regulate Health Care Costs to Cut Prices
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Structuring negotiations between insurers and providers, standardizing fee-for-service payments and negotiating prices can lower the United States’ health care spending by slowing the rate at which healthcare prices increase, according to a Rutgers study.

Newswise: Accelerator Makes Cross-Country Trek to Enable Laser Upgrade
Released: 20-Nov-2020 5:30 PM EST
Accelerator Makes Cross-Country Trek to Enable Laser Upgrade
Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

Today, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has shipped the final new section of accelerator that it has built for an upgrade of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The section of accelerator, called a cryomodule, has begun a cross-country road trip to DOE’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, where it will be installed in LCLS-II, the world’s brightest X-ray laser.

Newswise: The Motivation for Sustainable Aviation Fuels
Released: 20-Nov-2020 5:05 PM EST
The Motivation for Sustainable Aviation Fuels
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

A new report outlines future research paths that are needed for airlines to reduce carbon emissions and notes that the only way to achieve emission reduction goals is with Sustainable Aviation Fuels.

Released: 20-Nov-2020 4:25 PM EST
Those darn property taxes! Insights from Texas tax protests
University of California, Berkeley Haas School of Business

Everyone loves to complain that their taxes are too high. Yet few people actually take the time to formally protest them. A recent deep-dive into property tax appeals in Texas offers new insights on what motivates people to protest or accept their tax obligations.

Newswise: Screen-Shot-2020-11-19-at-1.27.59-PM.jpg
Released: 20-Nov-2020 3:45 PM EST
Science reveals secrets of a mummy’s portrait
University of Utah

How much information can you get from a speck of purple pigment, no bigger than the diameter of a hair, plucked from an Egyptian portrait that’s nearly 2,000 years old? Plenty, according to a new study. Analysis of that speck can teach us about how the pigment was made, what it’s made of – and maybe even a little about the people who made it.

Released: 20-Nov-2020 3:40 PM EST
Adolescent girls at high risk of violence in humanitarian settings
Washington University in St. Louis

Adolescent girls face elevated risks of gender-based violence in humanitarian settings. While some interventions exist, more needs to be done to ensure that global efforts to end gender-based violence include a focus on adolescent girls, finds a new study from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis.

Released: 20-Nov-2020 3:35 PM EST
Cornell-designed Arecibo telescope 'an inestimable loss'
Cornell University

In the wake of two recent support-cable failures, the National Science Foundation (NSF) will decommission and dismantle the giant dish at Arecibo Observatory – the world-class radio telescope in Puerto Rico that was conceived by Cornell University faculty, built with federal funding and then managed by Cornell for its first five decades.

Newswise:Video Embedded gordon-bell-special-prize-for-covid-19-research-announced
VIDEO
Released: 20-Nov-2020 3:30 PM EST
Gordon Bell Special Prize for COVID-19 Research Announced
University of California San Diego

A research team, including scientists from UC San Diego, Argonne National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, wins the Gordon Bell Special Prize for High Performance Computing-Based COVID-19 Research, presented during the SC20 virtual conference.

Newswise: vc
Released: 20-Nov-2020 3:20 PM EST
Artist Sonya Clark Launches “Solidarity Book Project,” a Racism, History & Social Justice Initiative
Amherst College

Sonya Clark, award-winning professor of art and the history of art at Amherst College, has launched the Solidarity Book Project, a collaborative, community-based artwork and activist initiative that invites participants to stand in solidarity with Black and Indigenous communities.

Released: 20-Nov-2020 2:45 PM EST
States Unfairly Burdening Incarcerated People with “Pay-to-Stay” Fees
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Pay-to-stay, the practice of charging people to pay for their own jail or prison confinement, is being enforced unfairly by using criminal, civil and administrative law, according to a new Rutgers University-New Brunswick led study.

Released: 20-Nov-2020 2:30 PM EST
How Are Older Adults Coping With the Mental Health Effects of COVID-19?
McLean Hospital

Highlights • Recent studies indicate that older adults may be withstanding the mental health strains of the COVID-19 pandemic better than other age groups • A combination of factors may contribute to this resiliency • Access to technology, and the ability to use it, are likely key

Newswise: Testing Wastewater for COVID-19
Released: 20-Nov-2020 2:25 PM EST
Testing Wastewater for COVID-19
University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV)

UNLV researcher Edwin Oh and colleagues have implemented wastewater surveillance programs to screen samples for the presence of COVID-19 and to extract the RNA from the SARS-COV-2 virus to find targets that make vaccines more effective.

Newswise: New treatments for hot flashes target neurons
Released: 20-Nov-2020 2:20 PM EST
New treatments for hot flashes target neurons
University of Washington School of Medicine

Specifically, Dr. Susan Reed talked about research into drugs that act at the kisspeptin/neurokinin B/ dynorphin (KNDy) neuron complex in the hypothalamus which controls reproduction and hormonal control. During menopause, estrogen levels decrease, which causes these neurons to be hyperstimulated, thereby causing hot flashes.

Newswise: After more than a decade, ChIP-seq may be quantitative after all
Released: 20-Nov-2020 2:15 PM EST
After more than a decade, ChIP-seq may be quantitative after all
Van Andel Institute

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (Nov. 20, 2020) — For more than a decade, scientists studying epigenetics have used a powerful method called ChIP-seq to map changes in proteins and other critical regulatory factors across the genome. While ChIP-seq provides invaluable insights into the underpinnings of health and disease, it also faces a frustrating challenge: its results are often viewed as qualitative rather than quantitative, making interpretation difficult.

Released: 20-Nov-2020 2:10 PM EST
Call for Health Care Providers to Advocate for Disability Rights During COVID-19
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A recent paper highlights concerns around access to medical treatment and medical rationing decisions for people with disabilities during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Newswise: 249333_web.jpg
Released: 20-Nov-2020 2:05 PM EST
'Oasis effect' in urban parks could contribute to greenhouse gas emissions
Arizona State University (ASU)

It will come as no surprise to anyone living in Phoenix, Arizona, that 2020 has been a record-breaking year for high temperatures.

Released: 20-Nov-2020 2:00 PM EST
Three reasons why COVID-19 can cause silent hypoxia
Boston University

Scientists are still solving the many puzzling aspects of how the novel coronavirus attacks the lungs and other parts of the body.

Newswise: Some Amazon Rainforest Regions More Resistant to Climate Change than Previously Thought
19-Nov-2020 12:40 PM EST
Some Amazon Rainforest Regions More Resistant to Climate Change than Previously Thought
Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

Is the Amazon rainforest as sensitive to water stress as what the current models have been showing? Columbia Engineering researchers found that the models have been largely over-estimating water stress in tropical forests. While models show that increases in air dryness greatly diminish photosynthesis rates in certain regions of the Amazon rainforest, observational data results show the opposite: in certain very wet regions, the forests instead even increase photosynthesis rates in response to drier air.

17-Nov-2020 4:15 PM EST
New solvent-based recycling process could cut down on millions of tons of plastic waste
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Multilayer plastic materials are ubiquitous in food and medical supply packaging, particularly since layering polymers can give those films specific properties, like heat resistance or oxygen and moisture control. But despite their utility, those ever-present plastics are impossible to recycle using conventional methods.

Released: 20-Nov-2020 1:55 PM EST
New Grant Seeks to Fill Knowledge Gaps Regarding Spina Bifida
University of California San Diego Health

Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine and Rady Children’s Institute for Genomic Medicine have been awarded a five-year, $8.3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to investigate the causes of spina bifida, the most common structural defect of the central nervous system.

Released: 20-Nov-2020 1:55 PM EST
Tel Aviv University study finds hyperbaric oxygen treatments reverse aging process
American Friends of Tel Aviv University

A new study from Tel Aviv University (TAU) and the Shamir Medical Center in Israel indicates that hyperbaric oxygen treatments (HBOT) in healthy aging adults can stop the aging of blood cells and reverse the aging process.

Newswise: 249228_web.jpg
Released: 20-Nov-2020 1:50 PM EST
The microbiome of Da Vinci's drawings
Frontiers

The work of Leonardo Da Vinci is an invaluable heritage of the 15th century. From engineering to anatomy, the master paved the way for many scientific disciplines.

Released: 20-Nov-2020 1:40 PM EST
MMR vaccine could protect against COVID-19
American Society for Microbiology (ASM)

The measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine has been theorized to provide protection against COVID-19.

Newswise: 249504_web.jpg
Released: 20-Nov-2020 1:35 PM EST
T-cell abnormalities in severe COVID-19 cases
Kumamoto University

There is an idea within the coronavirus research field that there is some kind of T cell abnormality in critically ill COVID-19 patients, but specific details have not yet been clarified.

Newswise: Cell-Free Technology Accelerates Industrial Biotechnology
Released: 20-Nov-2020 1:30 PM EST
Cell-Free Technology Accelerates Industrial Biotechnology
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Industrial biotechnology aims to use microbes, such as bacteria, as factories to convert molecules into desirable products using enzymes. Scientists have now developed a framework to rapidly select from hundreds of options to design, build, and optimize enzymes without the need for intact cells.

Newswise: Alex%20Trebek-Hubspot-11-12-20.png
Released: 20-Nov-2020 1:20 PM EST
Alex Trebek’s Death Raising Awareness and Questions About Pancreatic Cancer
University of Colorado Cancer Center

Longtime “Jeopardy!” host Alex Trebek announced it to the world on March 6, 2019: Like 50,000 other Americans each year, he had been diagnosed with stage 4 pancreatic cancer.

Released: 20-Nov-2020 1:15 PM EST
Antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 are detected up to 3 months after infection
Barcelona Institute for Global Health

A new study in health care workers led by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), an institution supported by "la Caixa" Foundation and the Hospital Clínic of Barcelona, shows that IgA and IgM antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 decay quickly, while IgG antibody levels are maintained for at least three months after infection.

Released: 20-Nov-2020 1:15 PM EST
Arizona State University releases first comprehensive survey on how companies are protecting their employees from COVID-19
Arizona State University (ASU)

A new global business survey conducted by the College of Health Solutions at Arizona State University (ASU) and the World Economic Forum (WEF), with support from The Rockefeller Foundation, finds that less than 20% of employers report testing their workers for COVID-19, and 35% have permanently reduced their workforce. The survey, which was completed by 1,125 employers from 29 countries with the majority over a period of six weeks, September to October, found that for companies with employees onsite at the workplace, many are taking some steps to reduce the risk of spreading the virus. Nearly three-fourths (74%) of these companies report they require masks for their employees, and nearly 80% make masks and hand sanitizer available.

Newswise: Study: Countering hate on social media
Released: 20-Nov-2020 1:10 PM EST
Study: Countering hate on social media
Santa Fe Institute

The rise of online hate speech is a disturbing, growing trend in countries around the world, with serious psychological consequences and the potential to impact, and even contribute to, real-world violence. A new paper offers a framework for studying the dynamics of online hate and counter speech, and offers the first large-scale classification of millions of instances such interactions on Twitter.

Released: 20-Nov-2020 1:05 PM EST
Potential Cellular Target for Eliminating Bone Breakdown in Osteoporosis Found
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

By disabling a function of a set of cells in mice, researchers appear to have halted the process that breaks down bone, a likely boon for osteoporosis treatment

Released: 20-Nov-2020 12:55 PM EST
COVID-19 Patients Survive In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest at Pre-Pandemic Rates
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Resuscitation and survival rates for hospitalized COVID-19 patients who have cardiac arrest are much higher than earlier reports of near-zero; variation at the individual hospital level may have affected overall numbers

Released: 20-Nov-2020 12:55 PM EST
Risk of mental disorders later in life potentially higher in kids of low-income families
University of Helsinki

Researchers at the University of Helsinki, Aarhus University and the University of Manchester have investigated the link between the socio-economic position of parents and the risk of children developing mental disorders later in life.

Newswise: 249519_web.jpg
Released: 20-Nov-2020 12:35 PM EST
Middle Stone Age populations repeatedly occupied West African coast
Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History

Although coastlines have widely been proposed as potential corridors of past migration, the occupation of Africa's tropical coasts during the Stone Age is poorly known, particularly in contrast to the temperate coasts of northern and southern Africa. Recent studies in eastern Africa have begun to resolve this, detailing dynamic behavioural changes near the coast of Kenya during the last glacial phase, but studies of Stone Age occupations along western Africa's coasts are still lacking.


Showing results

201250 of 239512

close
1.60707