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Released: 9-Sep-2020 3:05 PM EDT
AU Experts Comment on Signing of the Historic Israel-UAE Deal
American University

AU Experts Comment on Signing of the Historic Israel-UAE Deal

Newswise: Child Abuse and COVID-19
Released: 9-Sep-2020 2:50 PM EDT
Child Abuse and COVID-19
University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV)

Continued school closures and distance learning have drawn more than the ire of parents and teachers concerned about the impacts to education. Child advocates are worried about the COVID-19 pandemic’s effect on youth stuck at home with their abusers. For months, researchers tracking data from across Nevada and the nation have been logging significant dips in child abuse reports — a phenomenon attributed to the lack of face time children are getting with teachers, who are trained to spot potential signs of maltreatment and required by law to report it to authorities.

Released: 9-Sep-2020 2:40 PM EDT
FSU expert available to speak on protests and protest movements
Florida State University

By: Mark Blackwell Thomas | Published: September 9, 2020 | 2:01 pm | SHARE:  The first pandemic in a century, racial equality, voting rights and police misconduct have sparked spontaneous and planned protests across the nation. With political and social polarization reaching levels not seen in generations, millions of Americans are taking to the streets to have their voices heard.

Newswise: KICK OUT PD: Feasibility and Quality of Life in the Pilot Karate Intervention to Change Kinematic Outcomes in Parkinson’s Disease
8-Sep-2020 9:50 AM EDT
KICK OUT PD: Feasibility and Quality of Life in the Pilot Karate Intervention to Change Kinematic Outcomes in Parkinson’s Disease
PLOS

19-person pilot study shows community-based karate classes may improve quality of life and wellbeing for individuals with mild-to-moderate Parkinson's Disease (PD)--with over 50% of study participants choosing to continue their karate practice six months after trial end

Newswise: High literacy rate among military in late biblical kingdom of Judah
4-Sep-2020 9:55 AM EDT
High literacy rate among military in late biblical kingdom of Judah
PLOS

The ability to read and write was more widespread than expected among the people of Judah in the late 7th century BCE, according to a study published September 9, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Arie Shaus of Tel Aviv University, Israel, and colleagues.

Released: 9-Sep-2020 1:20 PM EDT
Pivoting Is the New Normal (In the COVID-Impacted Business Environment)
University of Maryland, Robert H. Smith School of Business

Entrepreneur Andy Shallal and Maryland Smith Associate Dean of Undergraduate Programs Victor Mullins will discuss pivoting business strategy in the midst of a global pandemic, economic distress and racial protests.

Released: 9-Sep-2020 11:35 AM EDT
Feeling misunderstood boosts support for Brexit
University of Exeter

Feeling misunderstood by other groups makes people more likely to support separatist causes like Brexit and Scottish independence, new research suggests.

Released: 9-Sep-2020 9:55 AM EDT
As Collegiate Esports Become More Professional, Women Are Being Left Out
North Carolina State University

A new study finds the rapidly growing field of collegiate esports is effectively becoming a two-tiered system, with club-level programs that are often supportive of gender diversity being clearly distinct from well-funded varsity programs that are dominated by men.

Released: 9-Sep-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Study: Exploited San Francisco Workers are "Suffering Silently"
Rutgers School of Management and Labor Relations (SMLR)

Many of the city's most vulnerable workers are too afraid to file a complaint when their employer pays them below the minimum wage. Domestic workers are the biggest victims. Bar and restaurant employees are also high on the list.

Released: 9-Sep-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Correcting Covid-19 Misconceptions May Require Speaking to Individuals’ Moral Values, According to New Research
American Educational Research Association (AERA)

The effectiveness of educational content aimed at correcting misconceptions about the risks, transmission, and prevention of Covid-19 is largely influenced by a person’s prevailing moral values, according to a new study published today in Educational Researcher, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association.

Newswise: akbarpour-pandemicmap-1630.jpg?itok=P3iXz9OV
Released: 9-Sep-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Mapping the Good and the Bad of Pandemic-Related Restrictions
Stanford Graduate School of Business

Pandemics bring pain. But so do the prescriptions for containing them: From school closures to total lockdowns, every government-mandated approach to blunting the impact of COVID-19 involves a trade-off between lives saved and jobs lost.

Newswise: seru-creditbribes_1630.jpg?itok=h7nuyIiM
Released: 9-Sep-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Craftier Than Cash: How Banks Use Credit Cards to Bribe Bureaucrats
Stanford Graduate School of Business

Bribery doesn’t necessarily involve suitcases of cash, all-expense-paid vacations, or secret gifts of jewelry. For people who don’t want to get caught, subtlety can be more practical.

Released: 9-Sep-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Study: Wage Theft Runs Rampant During Recessions
Rutgers School of Management and Labor Relations (SMLR)

Employers are more likely to cheat their workers during periods of high unemployment. It happened during the Great Recession of 2008. It's even more likely during the COVID recession, in part because of President Trump's recent executive order relaxing enforcement.

Released: 9-Sep-2020 8:40 AM EDT
Online college instruction has improved since the pandemic began, say college students, but instruction on the internet should cost less, reports study by the USC Center for the Digital Future
USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism

A growing number of college students like their online instruction during the COVID-19 pandemic, but many want reduced tuition if their education is online and not in person, reported the second study on the social and cultural impact of the coronavirus conducted by the USC Center for the Digital Future.

Newswise: A Rutgers Pediatrician Offers Tips for Families on Staying Mindful When Using Screens
Released: 9-Sep-2020 8:05 AM EDT
A Rutgers Pediatrician Offers Tips for Families on Staying Mindful When Using Screens
Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

During the COVID-19 pandemic, most children are spending more time on screens since other activities are limited. With children also participating in virtual learning, many parents are concerned that this increased use of screen time could be detrimental to their child’s development. A Rutgers pediatrician discusses the research on screen time for children, and how families can come up with a plan that is thoughtful, and also realistic.

Newswise: Study Suggests Unconscious Learning Underlies Belief in God
8-Sep-2020 10:05 AM EDT
Study Suggests Unconscious Learning Underlies Belief in God
Georgetown University Medical Center

Individuals who can unconsciously predict complex patterns, an ability called implicit pattern learning, are likely to hold stronger beliefs that there is a god who creates patterns of events in the universe, according to neuroscientists at Georgetown University.

Released: 8-Sep-2020 6:35 PM EDT
COVID-stress may be hard to beat even with exercise
Washington State University

Exercise has been shown to reduce anxiety and stress, but it may not be enough for the levels caused by COVID-19.

Released: 8-Sep-2020 6:20 PM EDT
Romantic partners influence each other's goals
University of Basel

Over the long-term, what one partner in a two-person relationship wishes to avoid, so too does the other partner - and what one wants to achieve, so does the other.

Newswise: People Who Experienced Parental Divorce as Children Have Lower ‘Love Hormone’ Levels than Those Who Did Not
Released: 8-Sep-2020 6:05 PM EDT
People Who Experienced Parental Divorce as Children Have Lower ‘Love Hormone’ Levels than Those Who Did Not
Baylor University

People who were children when their parents were divorced showed lower levels of oxytocin — the so-called “love hormone” — when they were adults than those whose parents remained married, according to a study led by Baylor University. That lower level may play a role in having trouble forming attachments when they are grown.

Released: 8-Sep-2020 5:05 PM EDT
College Students Need Connection, Routine, Equity to Thrive in Online Coursework
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Fostering a sense of community and connection for college students will ensure a better remote learning experience in the fall, according to researchers from Rutgers University-New Brunswick.

Newswise: Salisbury University Announces Clarke Honors College with $1.5 Million Endowment
Released: 8-Sep-2020 4:40 PM EDT
Salisbury University Announces Clarke Honors College with $1.5 Million Endowment
Salisbury University

For Bob Clarke and Glenda Chatham, Salisbury University was a special place when they met on campus in 1968. The couple hopes to make the institution even more special for students today, announcing a $1.5 million endowment for the SU Honors College, which now bears their name.

Released: 8-Sep-2020 3:50 PM EDT
Gun owner perceptions about actual firearm dangers suggest opportunities for improving gun safety
UC Davis Health

People who own guns and those living with gun owners are substantially less worried about the risk of firearm injuries than individuals living in homes without guns, says a new study by violence prevention experts at UC Davis Health.

Released: 8-Sep-2020 3:45 PM EDT
How birth control, girls’ education can slow population growth
University of Washington

Education and family planning have long been tied to lower fertility trends. But new research from the University of Washington analyzes those factors to determine, what accelerates a decline in otherwise high-fertility countries.

Newswise: Campaign for UC San Diego Raises Record-Breaking $344.4M
Released: 8-Sep-2020 2:15 PM EDT
Campaign for UC San Diego Raises Record-Breaking $344.4M
University of California San Diego

Donors gave generously to the University of California San Diego in fiscal year 2019-2020 resulting in a record-breaking year for the Campaign for UC San Diego: $344.4 million was raised, bringing the campaign total through June 30, 2020 to $2.27 billion.

Released: 8-Sep-2020 1:30 PM EDT
New UVA Darden Courses Include Explorations of Inclusion, Managing in a Pandemic and Tech Policy
University of Virginia Darden School of Business

The University of Virginia Darden School of Business will offer a number of new courses for the 2020–21 academic year. The classes range from explorations of India’s role in the global economy to a deep dive into technology policy, among other topics.

Newswise: COVID-19 Deaths Among Black Essential Workers Linked to Racial Disparities
Released: 8-Sep-2020 1:15 PM EDT
COVID-19 Deaths Among Black Essential Workers Linked to Racial Disparities
University of Utah Health

Racial disparities among essential workers could be a key reason that Black Americans are more likely than whites to contract and die of COVID-19, according to researchers at the University of Utah. They found that Blacks disproportionately worked in nine vital occupations that increase their exposure to SARs-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

4-Sep-2020 2:05 PM EDT
Some Children at Higher Risk of Privacy Violations from Digital Apps
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

While federal privacy laws prohibit digital platforms from storing and sharing children’s personal information, those rules aren’t always enforced, researchers find.

Released: 8-Sep-2020 10:20 AM EDT
Study of ‘shrink-smart’ towns expanding to include curriculum, big data
Iowa State University

Iowa State's rural smart shrinkage project has received a three-year, $1.5 million grant from the National Science Foundation to build upon its pilot study examining whether there were towns in Iowa that have lost population but perception of quality of life has remained stable or improved.

Newswise: UNC Charlotte Appoints Diversity and Inclusion Leader
Released: 8-Sep-2020 10:15 AM EDT
UNC Charlotte Appoints Diversity and Inclusion Leader
University of North Carolina at Charlotte

UNC Charlotte Chancellor Sharon L. Gaber announced today the appointment of UNC Charlotte Professor Cheryl Waites Spellman, Ed.D., to the role of interim special assistant to the chancellor for diversity and inclusion, effective Sept. 16.

Released: 8-Sep-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Rutgers Philosopher Discusses "Tenet" Movie, Direction of Time
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

With Christopher Nolan's long-awaited "Tenet" arriving in movie theaters, Rutgers University-New Brunswick philosophy Professor Jill North, an expert on the philosophy of physics, discusses "Tenet," time's arrow and other sci-fi parables that challenge what we know about past, future, causality and time travel.

Released: 8-Sep-2020 8:30 AM EDT
Study Highlights Ties Between Racism and Activism in Black Youth
North Carolina State University

A new study finds that experiences with racism are associated with increased social consciousness and social justice activism in Black youth.

Released: 8-Sep-2020 8:05 AM EDT
An Early Effect of COVID-19 Disruption: Drinking to Cope with Distress
Research Society on Alcoholism

Using alcohol to cope with distress was associated with increased drinking during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study. Adults experiencing greater depression or lower social connectedness, and those with children under age 18, were among those at risk for drinking to cope. The COVID-19 pandemic brought extensive disruptions to daily life, involving elevated stress among the general public. This increased the likelihood of people using alcohol to cope, a motive linked to solitary drinking, heavier drinking, and alcohol-related problems. At the same time, social distancing and closures meant that access to healthier supports, such as counseling and recreation, was reduced. The study in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research explored adult drinkers’ use of alcohol to cope with distress during the early pandemic, with the goal of informing interventions to address long-term alcohol-related harms.

Released: 8-Sep-2020 8:05 AM EDT
Suicide on screen: getting the message right can support better mental health outcomes
University of South Australia

University of South Australia researchers have confirmed that portrayals of suicide in moving-image fiction and non-fiction media, such as television and web series, films, and documentaries, has the potential to increase suicidal ideation and behaviour.

Released: 8-Sep-2020 8:00 AM EDT
A pain reliever that alters perceptions of risk
Ohio State University

While acetaminophen is helping you deal with your headache, it may also be making you more willing to take risks, a new study suggests. People who took acetaminophen rated activities like “bungee jumping off a tall bridge” as less risky than people who took a placebo.

Released: 4-Sep-2020 5:35 PM EDT
Mask mandates delayed by nearly a month in Republican-led states, UW study finds
University of Washington

Political science researchers at the University of Washington examined the factors associated with statewide mask mandates during the COVID-19 pandemic. When controlling for other factors, states with Republican governors delayed imposing broad indoor mask requirements by nearly a month.

Newswise: Williamson heads UA Little Rock’s School of Public Affairs
Released: 4-Sep-2020 11:05 AM EDT
Williamson heads UA Little Rock’s School of Public Affairs
University of Arkansas at Little Rock

Dr. Anne Williamson, a nationwide expert in housing policy, has been selected as the new director of the School of Public Affairs at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. Her research areas include housing policy, community development, citizen participation, and tax policy.

Newswise: Why You Should be Concerned About What Your Kids Watch During School Closures
Released: 4-Sep-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Why You Should be Concerned About What Your Kids Watch During School Closures
University of Kentucky

As the COVID-19 pandemic persists, children across the country are facing social isolation. With many school districts in the U.S. choosing remote learning, students are likely to consume more mass media. You might be wondering, should parents be concerned?

Newswise: Psychological abuse: obstetric care must delve deeper
Released: 4-Sep-2020 8:05 AM EDT
Psychological abuse: obstetric care must delve deeper
University of South Australia

As domestic violence skyrockets amid COVID-19, women’s health experts are calling for compulsory training of obstetric health practitioners to ensure they can recognise the signs of coercive control for women in their care.

Released: 4-Sep-2020 5:30 AM EDT
Sociologists Available to Comment on Police Brutality and Racial Inequality
American Sociological Association (ASA)

The murders of George Floyd and Jacob Blake are part of a continuum of police brutality toward Black individuals, which too often ends with murder. Sociologists study how this issue of police violence is related to class, race, and inequality.

Released: 3-Sep-2020 6:05 PM EDT
New Book Series Offers Oral History of Coronavirus Pandemic's Impact on Education
University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV)

Two-volume "Corona Chronicles" narratives recount how students, parents, administrators, and community members are navigating these uncertain times.

Released: 3-Sep-2020 5:05 PM EDT
COVID-19 sparks 12-fold increase in remote delivery of mental health care across the US
Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU)

The COVID-19 pandemic has spurred a remarkable number of psychologists across the United States to shift to delivering mental health care to patients remotely, according to a national study led by researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University.


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