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Released: 3-Aug-2020 1:50 PM EDT
How a gooey slime helps bacteria survive
University of Tsukuba

Bacteria have the ability to adapt to their environment to survive the host's immune defense.

Released: 3-Aug-2020 1:30 PM EDT
Consumer Behavior Has Shifted Significantly During Pandemic, Survey Reveals
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought about an increase in telework and online commerce, and a significant decrease in the number of personal trips people are making. Understanding the effects of these rapid changes on the economy, supply chains, and the environment will be essential, as some of these behaviors will continue even after the pandemic has ended. Researchers from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute recently presented the results of two sets of surveys they conducted in an effort to quantify and understand these unprecedented shifts.

Released: 3-Aug-2020 1:20 PM EDT
Rate of Asthma in Chicago Children Surpasses State and National Levels
Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

Prevalence of asthma in Chicago’s youth is higher than state and national levels, according to the latest survey of parents released by Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago and the Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH). The survey found that 16 percent of families have a child who had ever been diagnosed with asthma, above the 11 percent rate across Illinois and 12 percent nationwide.

Newswise:Video Embedded a-blood-test-could-predict-who-benefits-from-immunotherapy
VIDEO
Released: 3-Aug-2020 1:00 PM EDT
A blood test could predict who benefits from immunotherapy
University Health Network (UHN)

A test which detects changing levels of tumour fragments in the blood may be an easy, non-invasive and quick way to predict who will benefit from immunotherapy, a treatment option for advanced cancers.

Released: 3-Aug-2020 12:45 PM EDT
Cell biology society awarded $1.3M NIH grant to enhance diversity in academic biomedical workforce
American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB)

The American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) was awarded a first-of-its-kind National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant to enhance diversity in the academic biomedical workforce.

Released: 3-Aug-2020 12:45 PM EDT
Tulane study seeks new insights into panic disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder
Tulane University

A Tulane University psychologist received a $2.24 million NIH grant to study the causes of panic disorder and PTSD.

28-Jul-2020 1:30 PM EDT
X-Ray Scattering Facility for Extreme Biology Opens for Research
American Crystallographic Association (ACA)

Life on Earth manages to exist in the Mariana Trench and deep below the ocean floor, where extreme conditions create large effects on the behavior of biological molecules. At the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, a facility dedicated to high-pressure biological X-ray scattering is available for use to explore those deep ocean molecules. Richard Gillilan will describe the main capabilities of BioSAXS and call for scientific use of the facility at the 70th Annual Meeting of the American Crystallographic Association.

Released: 3-Aug-2020 12:40 PM EDT
Utah anchors and dominates industrial banking in the United States
Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute, David Eccles School of Business, University of Utah

The Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute today released a groundbreaking analysis detailing the substantial economic benefits of industrial banks in Utah, the nationwide center for this banking segment with a 110-year history.

Released: 3-Aug-2020 12:05 PM EDT
Arizonans Overwhelmingly Want Physicians to Supervise Nurse Anesthetists and Respond to Anesthesia Emergencies
American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA)

The Arizona Society of Anesthesiologists (AzSA) and the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) strongly oppose Governor Doug Ducey’s decision to “opt-out” of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services’ physician supervision requirement, which dismantles the anesthesia care team model in Arizona by allowing nurse anesthetists to administer anesthesia without physician supervision. Only 28% of Arizona voters support the governor’s exemption to this federal regulation that requires nurse anesthetists to administer anesthesia under the supervision of a physician.

Newswise: Tandon team shines light on roiling
market for stolen debit and credit cards
Released: 3-Aug-2020 12:05 PM EDT
Tandon team shines light on roiling market for stolen debit and credit cards
New York University

Damon McCoy and colleagues at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering analyzed multi-year data extracted from BriansClub, an underground bazaar for buying stolen and leaked credit card information. Among findings were that chip-enabled cards are no guarantee of security if owners still swipe the stripe: 85% of the stolen magnetic stripe data originated from EMV chip-enabled cards.

Released: 3-Aug-2020 12:00 PM EDT
ASBMB receives grant to promote faculty diversity
American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB)

The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology has won an almost $1.27 million five-year grant from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) to develop and execute a program that will support scientists from diverse backgrounds as they prepare for and launch their careers as independent faculty members.

Newswise: Association of American Cancer Institutes to Honor Nobel Laureate, William G. Kaelin, Jr.
Released: 3-Aug-2020 12:00 PM EDT
Association of American Cancer Institutes to Honor Nobel Laureate, William G. Kaelin, Jr.
Association of American Cancer Institutes (AACI)

William G. Kaelin, Jr., MD, will receive the Association of American Cancer Institutes’ (AACI) Distinguished Scientist Award on October 12, during the 2020 AACI/CCAF Annual Meeting.

Released: 3-Aug-2020 11:45 AM EDT
Can a quantum strategy help bring down the house?
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

In a paper published this week in the journal Physical Review A, the researchers lay out a theoretical scenario in which two players, playing cooperatively against the dealer, can better coordinate their strategies using a quantumly entangled pair of systems.

Newswise: Study shows demolishing vacant houses can have positive effect on neighbor maintenance
Released: 3-Aug-2020 11:25 AM EDT
Study shows demolishing vacant houses can have positive effect on neighbor maintenance
Iowa State University

New research out of Iowa State University suggests that demolishing abandoned houses may lead nearby property owners to better maintain their homes.

Released: 3-Aug-2020 11:20 AM EDT
For solar boom, scrap silicon for this promising mineral
Cornell University

Cornell University engineers have found that photovoltaic wafers in solar panels with all-perovskite structures outperform photovoltaic cells made from state-of-the-art crystalline silicon, as well as perovskite-silicon tandem cells, which are stacked pancake-style cells that absorb light better.

Released: 3-Aug-2020 11:20 AM EDT
Caregiver-Reported Child Sleep Problems Associated with Impaired Academic and Psychosocial Functioning in Middle Childhood
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Whether children have ongoing sleep problems from birth through childhood or do not develop sleep problems until they begin school, a new study by researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) has found that sleep disturbances at any age are associated with diminished well-being by the time the children are 10 or 11 years old. The findings, which were published in The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, suggest health care providers should screen children for sleep problems at every age and intervene early when a sleep problem is identified.

31-Jul-2020 4:05 PM EDT
The effects of COVID-19 on emergency visits, hospitalizations
Mayo Clinic

COVID-19 swept into the U.S., hospitals across the country have reported that their emergency departments are emptying out. In a new study published Monday, Aug. 3, in JAMA Internal Medicine, a team of researchers from multiple institutions provides insights into this phenomenon.

Newswise: Most retirement investors should stay the course in market swings, UAH professor says
Released: 3-Aug-2020 10:35 AM EDT
Most retirement investors should stay the course in market swings, UAH professor says
University of Alabama Huntsville

In a volatile stock market, retirement-minded investors who are funding a 401(k), IRA or similar investment vehicle should check their allocations and then stay the course, says Dr. John Burnett, an associate professor in the Finance Department of the College of Business at The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH).

Released: 3-Aug-2020 10:30 AM EDT
Study Seeks to Reduce Barriers to Breastfeeding Premature Babies
Rush University Medical Center

To help increase breastfeeding among premature infants, researchers at Rush University Medical Center will test the effects of an intervention that addresses barriers to breastfeeding.

Released: 3-Aug-2020 10:20 AM EDT
Maryam Fouladi, MD, Named Co-Executive Director of Pediatric Neuro-Oncology Program
Nationwide Children's Hospital

Dr. Fouladi will continue her extensive work on brain stem gliomas (DIPG) at Nationwide Children’s alongside Jeffrey Leonard, MD, co-executive director of the Pediatric Neuro-Oncology Program and chief of Neurosurgery at Nationwide Children’s.

Newswise: Important Dementia Studies Continuing at UK Despite Ongoing COVID-19 Pandemic
Released: 3-Aug-2020 10:20 AM EDT
Important Dementia Studies Continuing at UK Despite Ongoing COVID-19 Pandemic
University of Kentucky

The COVID-19 pandemic brought many things to a screeching halt and continues to impact our daily lives. However, important research at the University of Kentucky’s Sanders-Brown Center on Aging (SBCoA) is continuing under extreme caution and deep dedication. A monumental study in the field of dementia research is set to get underway in the coming weeks at UK.

Released: 3-Aug-2020 9:30 AM EDT
Penn Researchers Identify New Genetic Cause of a Form of Inherited Neuropathy
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Inherited mutations in a gene that keeps nerve cells intact was shown, for the first time, to be a driver of a neuropathy known as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. This finding is detailed in a study led by researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, presenting a clearer picture of the disease’s genetic underpinnings that could inform the development of gene therapies to correct it.

Newswise: NewYork-Presbyterian Alexandra Cohen Hospital for Women and Newborns Opens
Released: 3-Aug-2020 9:00 AM EDT
NewYork-Presbyterian Alexandra Cohen Hospital for Women and Newborns Opens
New York-Presbyterian Hospital

NewYork-Presbyterian today celebrated the opening of the NewYork-Presbyterian Alexandra Cohen Hospital for Women and Newborns, a state-of-the-art facility dedicated to providing exceptional, individualized care to pregnant women and their newborn babies before, during, and after childbirth—including advanced care for high-risk pregnancies and newborns who require extra support.

Newswise: smartstirrer.jpg
Released: 3-Aug-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Novel magnetic stirrer speaks to lab equipment
University of Warwick

A current problem for a wide range of chemists is when stirring a solution in the laboratory there is a need to check the properties of the solution and monitor how they change.

Released: 3-Aug-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Neutrolis Announces Development Of First-In-Class Treatment Targeting Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs) For Patients With Severe COVID-19
Neutrolis

Novel Chromatinase™ platform could rapidly and systemically removes NETs associated with exacerbation of COVID-19

30-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Study: Experiencing Childhood Trauma Makes Body and Brain Age Faster
American Psychological Association (APA)

Children who suffer trauma from abuse or violence early in life show biological signs of aging faster than children who have never experienced adversity, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. The study examined three different signs of biological aging--early puberty, cellular aging and changes in brain structure--and found that trauma exposure was associated with all three.

Released: 3-Aug-2020 8:55 AM EDT
American College of Radiology to Provide Image Coordination for National COVID-19 Observational Study
American College of Radiology (ACR)

The American College of Radiology® (ACR®) Center for Research and Innovation™ (CRI) will serve as the imaging coordination center for the multicenter COVID-19 Observational Study (CORAL) led by Dr. Catherine "Terri" L. Hough of the Oregon Health & Science University. The CORAL Study is part of the Prevention & Early Treatment of Acute Lung Injury (PETAL) Network, a consortium of academic and affiliated hospitals across the United States – funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health – to conduct clinical trials in patients with or at risk for critical illness, including acute respiratory distress syndrome.

Newswise: Study: Oriole Hybridization Is a Dead End
Released: 3-Aug-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Study: Oriole Hybridization Is a Dead End
Cornell University

A half-century of controversy over two popular bird species may have finally come to an end. In one corner: the Bullock's Oriole, found in the western half of North America. In the other corner: the Baltimore Oriole, breeding in the eastern half. Where their ranges meet in the Great Plains, the two mix freely and produce apparently healthy hybrid offspring. But according to scientists from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, hybridization is a dead end and both parent species will remain separate.

Released: 3-Aug-2020 8:35 AM EDT
Evaluating the effectiveness of travel bans
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

A new study sheds light on how COVID-19 spreads regionally and between countries, as well as on how effective governmental measures to curb the spread of the pandemic have been to date.

Newswise: New Study on Development of Parkinson’s Disease is ‘On the Nose’
Released: 3-Aug-2020 8:30 AM EDT
New Study on Development of Parkinson’s Disease is ‘On the Nose’
Florida Atlantic University

Scientists suggest that the initial impact of environmental toxins inhaled through the nose may induce inflammation in the brain, triggering the production of Lewy bodies that can then be spread to other brain regions. However, the relationship linking olfactory dysfunction and Parkinson’s disease development remains unclear. New findings from a study add weight to this theory and identify a critical signaling molecule that may be key to the domino effect kicked off by nasal inflammation.

Released: 3-Aug-2020 8:10 AM EDT
PhRMA Foundation Highlights Updated Mission, New Funding Categories and Awardee Achievements in 2019 Annual Report
PhRMA Foundation

The PhRMA Foundation has released its 2019 annual report, highlighting a year of activity that included updating its mission and priorities, the launch of new funding programs and an expansion of its efforts to improve the effectiveness of value assessment in health care.

Released: 3-Aug-2020 8:10 AM EDT
Updated ILSI Nutrition Reference Captures Latest Research in Context
International Life Sciences Institute North America

The 11th edition of Present Knowledge in Nutrition, the latest update of ILSI's major nutrition reference source will be useful to dieticians, librarians, medical nutritionists and others in the nutrition field.

Released: 3-Aug-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Baby boomers show concerning decline in cognitive functioning
Ohio State University

In a reversal of trends, American baby boomers scored lower on a test of cognitive functioning than did members of previous generations, according to a new nationwide study.

Newswise: Engineers developing no-touch, mail-in, fast-scan test for COVID-19, other outbreaks
Released: 3-Aug-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Engineers developing no-touch, mail-in, fast-scan test for COVID-19, other outbreaks
Iowa State University

Engineers are developing a no-touch, mail-in, fast-scan diagnostic sensing system that could be used to quickly test for COVID-19 or other outbreaks. The system would also produce a real-time outbreak map with demographic details.

Newswise: Challenges in Diagnosing Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis Addressed in Latest Guidelines for Clinicians
Released: 3-Aug-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Challenges in Diagnosing Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis Addressed in Latest Guidelines for Clinicians
American Thoracic Society (ATS)

Aug. 3, 2020─ More than 30 years after the last guidance on the clinical evaluation of hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP), the American Thoracic Society – in collaboration with the Asociación Latinoamericana de Tórax or ALAT and the Japanese Respiratory Society– has developed new guidelines for clinicians. The guidelines are available online ahead of print in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Newswise: Cannabinoids may affect activity of other pharmaceuticals
31-Jul-2020 2:05 PM EDT
Cannabinoids may affect activity of other pharmaceuticals
Penn State College of Medicine

Cannabinoid-containing products may alter the effects of some prescription drugs, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers.

Released: 3-Aug-2020 6:00 AM EDT
Simply Expanding Medicaid Coverage Can’t Solve This Leading Public Health Challenge
American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO)

New research shows significantly more people with diabetes got their critical annual dilated eye exam during the first two years following Medicaid expansion under the under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). However, this encouraging increase in the exam rate did not persist beyond two years.

Newswise: Atrium Health Tele-ICU Evolves to Meet COVID-19 Challenges
30-Jul-2020 1:55 PM EDT
Atrium Health Tele-ICU Evolves to Meet COVID-19 Challenges
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN)

Atrium Health’s tele-ICU quickly adjusted its patient-centered focus to include supporting and protecting bedside nurses caring for patients in isolation, as part of the system’s planning and preparations for the pandemic.

Newswise: ISPOR Announces Virtual ISPOR Asia Pacific 2020
Released: 3-Aug-2020 12:05 AM EDT
ISPOR Announces Virtual ISPOR Asia Pacific 2020
ISPOR—The Professional Society for Health Economics and Outcomes Research

ISPOR—The Professional Society for Health Economics and Outcomes Research announced its Virtual ISPOR Asia Pacific 2020 event programming today. Registration is now open for the virtual event that will be held 14-16 September 2020.

Newswise:Video Embedded survey-finds-american-s-social-media-habits-changing-as-national-tensions-rise
VIDEO
30-Jul-2020 7:30 PM EDT
Survey Finds American's Social Media Habits Changing As National Tensions Rise
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

As national tensions rise, a new national survey of 2,000 people commissioned by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center finds more Americans are adjusting how they use social media platforms.

Newswise: New studies show how to save parasites and why it’s important
31-Jul-2020 7:15 AM EDT
New studies show how to save parasites and why it’s important
University of Washington

An international group of scientists published a paper Aug. 1 in a special edition of the journal Biological Conservation that lays out an ambitious global conservation plan for parasites. A related paper found that responses of parasites to environmental change are likely to be complex, and that a changing world probably will see both outbreaks of some parasites and a total loss of other parasite species.

1-Aug-2020 8:05 AM EDT
Updated ILSI Nutrition Reference Captures Latest Research in Context
International Life Sciences Institute North America

The 11th edition of Present Knowledge in Nutrition, the latest update of ILSI's major nutrition reference source will be useful to dieticians, librarians, medical nutritionists and others in the nutrition field.

Newswise: Digital Twin program brings new life to old aircraft
Released: 31-Jul-2020 5:35 PM EDT
Digital Twin program brings new life to old aircraft
Wichita State University

Wichita State University's National Institute for Aviation Research (NIAR)'s Digital Twin program is using two Blackhawk helicopters and a B-1 Bomber to help the military maintain and repair similar aircraft.

Released: 31-Jul-2020 5:05 PM EDT
Looking up to the Joneses: Consequences of the perceptions of white wealth
Society for Personality and Social Psychology

Before the era of COVID-19, research suggested that premature deaths among white Americans were rising. Even before the era of COVID-19, these findings were surprising.


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