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1-Jun-2020 5:05 PM EDT
Sleep, Death and … the Gut?
Harvard Medical School

A new study finds in sleep-deprived fruit flies, premature death is always preceded by the accumulation of reactive oxidative species in the gut. Antioxidant compounds that neutralize ROS allow sleep-deprived flies to have normal lifespans.

Released: 4-Jun-2020 10:45 AM EDT
DNA-barcoded microbial spores can trace origin of objects, agricultural products
Harvard Medical School

Harvard scientists have developed DNA-barcoded microbial spores that can be safely introduced onto objects and surfaces at a point of origin, such as a field or manufacturing plant, and be identified months later, to help trace problems like the source of foodborne illness.

Newswise: Assessing Data Integrity in Times of COVID
Released: 4-Jun-2020 9:50 AM EDT
Assessing Data Integrity in Times of COVID
Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

Rutgers Cancer Institute expert discusses guarding data integrity for the first remdesivir double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial addressing treatment for COVID-19.

Newswise: MD Anderson and Rakuten Medical announce strategic alliance to advance Illuminox platform for cancer treatments
Released: 4-Jun-2020 9:40 AM EDT
MD Anderson and Rakuten Medical announce strategic alliance to advance Illuminox platform for cancer treatments
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and Rakuten Medical, Inc. today announced a strategic alliance collaboration agreement to advance the development of new cancer therapies based on Rakuten Medical’s proprietary IlluminoxTM technology platform.

Newswise:Video Embedded split-ends-new-studies-show-how-dna-crossovers-can-drive-healthy-abnormal-sperm-egg-cell-division
VIDEO
Released: 4-Jun-2020 9:35 AM EDT
Split Ends: New studies show how DNA crossovers can drive healthy, abnormal sperm, egg cell division
Harvard Medical School

Human genetic diversity wouldn't be possible without DNA crossovers in egg and sperm cells. Two Harvard Medical School studies provide new insights into how crossovers go right--and wrong, leading to infertility, miscarriages and birth defects.

Newswise: The Medical Minute: What to expect when seeking medical care now
Released: 4-Jun-2020 9:30 AM EDT
The Medical Minute: What to expect when seeking medical care now
Penn State Health

As outpatient centers, clinics and practices gradually resume seeing patients, they look a bit different in response to COVID-19. In addition to keeping patients and staff safe, these changes are also helping make health care more convenient and accessible.

Released: 4-Jun-2020 9:20 AM EDT
Nurse Practitioner Leaders Will Discuss COVID-19 and Current Trends in Clinical Practice at the NCNP Virtual Summit 2020
Wolters Kluwer Health

The National Conference for Nurse Practitioners (NCNP) Virtual Summit 2020 will be held online June 19 and 20, featuring educational sessions relevant to advanced clinical practice and offering nurse practitioners the necessary tools to improve the overall quality of patient care.

Released: 4-Jun-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Coronavirus Linked to Stroke in Otherwise Healthy Young People
Thomas Jefferson University

Preliminary observations suggest a high incidence of COVID-19 in stroke patients, including younger patients who were otherwise healthy.

Released: 4-Jun-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Rakuten Medical and MD Anderson Announce Strategic Alliance to Advance Illuminox Platform for Cancer Treatments
Rakuten Medical, Inc.

Rakuten Medical, Inc. (Rakuten Medical) and The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (MD Anderson) today announced a strategic alliance collaboration agreement to advance the development of new cancer therapies based on Rakuten Medical's proprietary Illuminox™ technology platform.

3-Jun-2020 1:35 PM EDT
Scientists Discover that Nicotine Promotes Spread of Lung Cancer to the Brain
Wake Forest Baptist Health

Among people who have the most common type of lung cancer, up to 40% develop metastatic brain tumors, with an average survival time of less than six months.

Newswise: Continued nicotine use promotes brain tumors in lung cancer patients, Wake Forest study suggests
1-Jun-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Continued nicotine use promotes brain tumors in lung cancer patients, Wake Forest study suggests
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at Wake Forest School of Medicine have discovered that nicotine promotes the spread of lung cancer cells into the brain, where they can form deadly metastatic tumors. The study, which will be published June 4 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that nicotine replacement therapies may not be suitable strategies for lung cancer patients attempting to quit smoking. In addition, the researchers show that the naturally occurring drug parthenolide blocks nicotine-induced brain metastasis in mice, suggesting a potential therapeutic option in humans.

Newswise: Immune from Chronic Stress? Limit Inflammatory Signaling to Specific Brain Circuits
Released: 4-Jun-2020 8:30 AM EDT
Immune from Chronic Stress? Limit Inflammatory Signaling to Specific Brain Circuits
Florida Atlantic University

Chronic stress is associated with the pathogenesis of psychological disorders such as depression. A study is the first to identify the role of a neuronal receptor that straddles the intersection between social stress, inflammation, and anxiety in rodent models of stress. Findings suggest the possibility of developing better medications to treat the consequences of chronic stress by limiting inflammatory signaling not just generally, which may not be beneficial in the long run, but to specific brain circuits.

Released: 4-Jun-2020 5:45 AM EDT
COVID-19 Clinical Research Study Underway at Atlantic Health System, Including Immune Response Study
Atlantic Health System

The COVID Research Program is rapidly enrolling patients from New Jersey, which has one of the world’s highest concentrations of COVID-19 patients. Atlantic Health System offers a study sponsored by TScan Therapeutics, Inc., a leading T cell therapeutics company in Waltham, Massachusetts, focused on identifying the precise way the human immune system recognizes and responds to infections like COVID-19 or other diseases, like cancers. TScan has developed a novel technology that enables them to identify the natural targets of T cells.

Released: 4-Jun-2020 5:35 AM EDT
Declaring Racism a Public Health Crisis
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center

Statement from University Hospitals in Cleveland supporting Cleveland City Council resolution declaring racism a public health crisis.

Released: 4-Jun-2020 5:35 AM EDT
Nation’s Ophthalmologists Condemn Use of Tear Gas and Rubber Bullets
American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO)

This week, tear gas and rubber bullets blinded at least two Americans and caused serious eye injuries in many others. Life-altering eye injuries are a common result of urban warfare and rioting, worldwide. The American Academy of Ophthalmology condemns this growing problem.

Newswise: Study Shows Vision and Balance Issues are Common in Elementary School-age Children with a Concussion
2-Jun-2020 12:15 PM EDT
Study Shows Vision and Balance Issues are Common in Elementary School-age Children with a Concussion
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

In a new study, researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have performed the most comprehensive characterization of elementary school-age concussions to date, revealing an opportunity to improve outcomes for this age group through more consistent visio-vestibular assessments at the initial health care visit.

Newswise: App Determines COVID-19 Disease Severity Using Artificial Intelligence, Biomarkers
3-Jun-2020 4:10 AM EDT
App Determines COVID-19 Disease Severity Using Artificial Intelligence, Biomarkers
New York University

A new mobile app can help clinicians determine which patients with the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) are likely to have severe cases. Created by researchers at NYU College of Dentistry, the app uses artificial intelligence (AI) to assess risk factors and key biomarkers from blood tests, producing a COVID-19 “severity score.”

Released: 3-Jun-2020 4:50 PM EDT
Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Are the Threads that Strengthen the Fabric of the Medical Library Association
Medical Library Association

The Medical Library Association (MLA) reaffirms its commitment to social justice and to working to end racial inequity and systemic racism.

Released: 3-Jun-2020 4:30 PM EDT
Study: COVID-19 lockdowns worsen childhood obesity
University at Buffalo

Lockdowns implemented across the world due to the COVID-19 pandemic have negatively impacted diet, sleep and physical activity among children with obesity, according to University at Buffalo research.

Released: 3-Jun-2020 4:05 PM EDT
Scanning the Brain to Predict Behavior, a Daunting ‘Task’ for MRI
Association for Psychological Science

To study the brain “in action,” researchers use a specialized form of brain imaging known as task-based functional MRI (task-fMRI), which shows how the brain responds to stimuli. While this technique can reveal much about the general workings of the average human brain, new research indicates that task-fMRI lacks the reliability to predict individual behavior or how a person might respond to mental-health therapies.

3-Jun-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Does Using Marijuana Affect a Person’s Risk of Stroke?
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

The jury’s still out on whether the use of marijuana may increase the risk of stroke. While several larger studies have found an increased risk, other studies have found no such increased risk. Adding to the debate is a new study that looked at recent marijuana use and risk of ischemic stroke published in the June 3, 2020, online issue of Neurology® Clinical Practice.

Newswise: Developing field device to detect PFAS contamination
Released: 3-Jun-2020 2:50 PM EDT
Developing field device to detect PFAS contamination
South Dakota State University

Detecting the presence of harmful manmade chemicals known PFAS in water and samples may soon be possible using a portable field device.

Released: 3-Jun-2020 2:20 PM EDT
PhRMA Foundation Announces 2020 Value Assessment Research Award Recipients
PhRMA Foundation

The PhRMA Foundation announced recipients of its 2020 Value Assessment Research Awards. $300,000 was awarded to three teams whose proposals put forward new, innovative strategies for assessing the value of medicines and health care services.

Released: 3-Jun-2020 1:50 PM EDT
Impact of COVID-19 infection in blood cancer patients
Queen Mary University of London

One of the first studies to investigate the outcome of COVID-19 infection in patients with blood cancer has been conducted by clinical researchers from Queen Mary University of London and Barts Health NHS Trust.

Released: 3-Jun-2020 1:15 PM EDT
COVID-19 patients who undergo surgery are at increased risk of postoperative death
Massachusetts General Hospital

Patients undergoing surgery after contracting coronavirus are at greatly increased risk of postoperative death, a new global study published in The Lancet reveals. Researchers found that amongst SARS-CoV-2 infected patients who underwent surgery, mortality rates approach those of the sickest patients admitted to intensive care after contracting the virus in the community.

Newswise: Vision screening device improves detection of “lazy eye”
Released: 3-Jun-2020 1:05 PM EDT
Vision screening device improves detection of “lazy eye”
NIH, National Eye Institute (NEI)

The National Eye Institute (NEI) has funded development of a handheld pediatric vision scanner that easily and accurately screens for amblyopia, or “lazy eye.” The device could facilitate earlier identification of children who need vision-saving treatment when therapy is likely to be more effective. It also could reduce unnecessary referrals to ophthalmologists.

Released: 3-Jun-2020 12:45 PM EDT
Negative emotions cause stronger appetite responses in emotional eaters
Frontiers

Turning to a tub of ice cream after a break-up may be a cliché, but there's some truth to eating in response to negative emotions. Eating serves many functions - survival, pleasure, comfort, as well as a response to stress.

Released: 3-Jun-2020 12:10 PM EDT
Ending coronavirus lockdowns quickly can be more costly than relaxing them gradually
University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., June 3, 2020 — “We’re all in this together” is a commonly heard phrase during this global pandemic, as much of the world practices social distancing. And now researchers at the University of California, Irvine and other institutions have shown that there is some scientific validity to this assertion. In a study published today in Nature Human Behaviour, Chinese, European, American and British researchers demonstrate that the number of countries implementing COVID-19 lockdown measures – and the duration of those efforts – have a greater influence on the gross domestic products of nations than the severity of the restrictions.

Released: 3-Jun-2020 12:05 PM EDT
Survey Finds Large Increase in Psychological Distress Reported Among U.S. Adults During the COVID-19 Pandemic
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

A new survey conducted during the pandemic by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the SNF Agora Institute at Johns Hopkins University found a more-than-threefold increase in the percentage of U.S. adults who reported symptoms of psychological distress—from 3.9 percent in 2018 to 13.6 percent in April 2020.

Released: 3-Jun-2020 11:20 AM EDT
American College of Surgeons releases tools to prepare patients for operations during the time of COVID-19
American College of Surgeons (ACS)

As health care facilities resume operations paused due to COVID-19, a new survey shows many people are reluctant to undergo procedures and may not reschedule necessary care while COVID-19 continues to circulate in communities. To help surgeons and hospitals address patient concerns, ACS has released a new resource document.

Newswise: First Do No Harm – Researchers Urge Halt in Prescribing Hydroxycholoroquine for COVID-19
Released: 3-Jun-2020 11:00 AM EDT
First Do No Harm – Researchers Urge Halt in Prescribing Hydroxycholoroquine for COVID-19
Florida Atlantic University

Researchers urge a moratorium on prescribing chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine, with or without azithromycin, to treat or prevent COVID-19, and caution that the reassuring safety profile of hydroxychloroquine may be more apparent than real. Safety data derive from decades of prescriptions by clinicians, primarily for their patients with lupus and rheumatoid arthritis, both of which are of greater prevalence in younger and middle age women, who are at very low risk of fatal heart outcomes due to hydroxychloroquine.

Newswise: Cognitive behavior therapy tops other psychotherapies in reducing inflammation
3-Jun-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Cognitive behavior therapy tops other psychotherapies in reducing inflammation
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

A review of 56 randomized clinical trials finds that psychological and behavioral therapies may be effective non-drug treatments for reducing disease-causing inflammation in the body.

Newswise: Scientists Reveal How Mutations in Metabolism Can Drive Cancers
1-Jun-2020 12:15 PM EDT
Scientists Reveal How Mutations in Metabolism Can Drive Cancers
Yale Cancer Center

Yale Cancer Center scientists have identified mutations in metabolite-producing genes as a disruption of DNA repair. These mutation-driven “oncometabolites” may make cells more prone to developing cancer—but also more vulnerable to new cancer treatment strategies.

1-Jun-2020 1:15 PM EDT
Untangling the Effects of Past Adversity and Alcohol Use Disorder on Acute Stress Responses
Research Society on Alcoholism

The hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis is the body’s key stress response system. By driving production of the stress hormone cortisol, and then ensuring a return to baseline levels, the HPA axis regulates our reaction to stressful events. Chronic alcohol use, however, can lead to persistently elevated cortisol, reducing the body’s capacity to respond appropriately to stress. Among people in treatment for alcohol use disorder (AUD), the blunted stress response predicts risk of relapse and a return to drinking. Longer-term life stress, including childhood adversity, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and chronic stress, can also dampen HPA axis function, complicating interpretation of the alterations evident in people with AUD. However, it is not known how stress and trauma intereact with AUD to affect HPA-axis reactivity. A new report in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research by researchers from the universities of Texas, Florida, and Colorado addresses this issue, u

Newswise: NSF CAREER grant recipient offers potential boost for stem cell therapy
Released: 3-Jun-2020 9:55 AM EDT
NSF CAREER grant recipient offers potential boost for stem cell therapy
Penn State College of Engineering

Xiaojun “Lance” Lian, assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Penn State, has received a $500,000, five-year Early Career Development Program (CAREER) grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF). 

Newswise: UK, ArtemiLife Partner to Test for Anti-Cancer Activity of Artemisia Annua Extracts
Released: 3-Jun-2020 9:35 AM EDT
UK, ArtemiLife Partner to Test for Anti-Cancer Activity of Artemisia Annua Extracts
University of Kentucky

The University of Kentucky and ArtemiLife Inc. will collaborate on a clinical study using the extract of a medicinal plant grown in Kentucky to test for anti-cancer activity of Artemisia annua and to determine the recommended dose of Artemisia annua for future clinical trials.

Newswise: UK Study Finds Many Colon Cancer Patients Not Receiving Standard of Care Therapy
Released: 3-Jun-2020 9:35 AM EDT
UK Study Finds Many Colon Cancer Patients Not Receiving Standard of Care Therapy
University of Kentucky

A new University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center study finds that many Kentucky patients with colon cancer are not receiving the recommended standard of care therapy for their disease.

29-May-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Study finds PFAS exposure may cause early menopause in women
Endocrine Society

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substance (PFAS) exposure may cause menopause to occur two years earlier in women, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Newswise: Don’t Ignore Signs of Stroke or Heart Attack Due to COVID-19 Crisis
Released: 3-Jun-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Don’t Ignore Signs of Stroke or Heart Attack Due to COVID-19 Crisis
Hackensack Meridian Health

Many hospitals across the country have noticed an increase of people ignoring life-threatening symptoms. They are choosing to stay home, instead of seeking care at an emergency department. When they do arrive at the hospital, the patient has lost critical time to receive life-saving treatments.

Newswise: ATS Announces $500,000 COVID-19 Crisis Fund Support from AstraZeneca
Released: 3-Jun-2020 8:15 AM EDT
ATS Announces $500,000 COVID-19 Crisis Fund Support from AstraZeneca
American Thoracic Society (ATS)

June 3, 2020 –Today, the American Thoracic Society (ATS) announced a $500,000 donation from AstraZeneca to the ATS COVID-19 Crisis Fund, launched to support the Society’s all-encompassing efforts to fight COVID-19.

Newswise: New test for rare disease identifies children who may benefit from simple supplement
3-Jun-2020 4:20 AM EDT
New test for rare disease identifies children who may benefit from simple supplement
Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute and the Centro de Biología Molecular Severo Ochoa in Spain have created a test that determines which children with CAD deficiency—a rare metabolic disease—are likely to benefit from receiving uridine, a nutritional supplement that has dramatically improved the lives of other children with the condition. The study was published in Genetics in Medicine.

Released: 3-Jun-2020 6:55 AM EDT
Rapid coronavirus test speeds up access to urgent care and will free up beds ahead of winter
University of Cambridge

• The SAMBA II diagnostic device cuts COVID-19 test result times from over 24 hours to just two hours. • First “real-world” study of SAMBA devices on hospital wards finds patient time on COVID ‘holding wards’ was almost halved. • Researchers say faster tests helped free up beds and expedite access to life-saving treatments such as organ transplants – and might make all the difference later this year.

2-Jun-2020 6:00 AM EDT
Premier nutrition education conference goes virtual in 2020
Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior

Distinguished nutrition educators from around the world will gather in a truly global event this summer as the Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior hosts its 53rd Annual Conference entirely online.

Newswise: 233506_web.jpg
Released: 3-Jun-2020 5:30 AM EDT
Genetic study reveals similarities and differences of COVID-19 and SARS viruses
University of Tokyo

Researchers have identified specific portions of the genetic codes of the COVID-19 and SARS viruses that may promote the viruses' lifecycles. The new technique is researchers' first tool for determining what genetic sequences stored as RNA - DNA's chemical cousin - are more stable.


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