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Newswise: Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation Announces Sponsorship by United Therapeutics
Released: 14-Jan-2021 11:45 AM EST
Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation Announces Sponsorship by United Therapeutics
Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation

The Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation (PFF) has announced United Therapeutics' sponsorship of the PFF Registry, a research resource that tracks clinical data, blood samples and patient-reported outcomes from individuals living with pulmonary fibrosis nationwide.

Released: 14-Jan-2021 11:35 AM EST
Discrimination may increase risk of anxiety disorders regardless of genetics, study finds
Tufts University

Exposure to discrimination plays a significant role in the risk of developing anxiety and related disorders, even – in a first – after accounting for potential genetic risks, according to a multidisciplinary team of health researchers led by Tufts University and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Released: 14-Jan-2021 11:25 AM EST
Cancer Models Created by Mechanical Engineers Offer New Insight Into Tumor Growth
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

In research published today in Integrative Biology, a team of engineers from Rensselaer developed an in vitro — in the lab — lymphatic vessel model to study the growth of tumor emboli, collections of tumor cells within vessels that are often associated with increased metastasis and tumor recurrence.

Newswise: 253407_web.jpg
Released: 14-Jan-2021 11:15 AM EST
How the brain paralyzes you while you sleep
University of Tsukuba

We laugh when we see Homer Simpson falling asleep while driving, while in church, and while even operating the nuclear reactor.

Released: 14-Jan-2021 11:10 AM EST
Neither ‘meniscal’ nor ‘mechanical’ symptoms predict findings on knee arthroscopy
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott

Orthopaedic surgeons have traditionally been taught that certain types of knee symptoms indicate damage to specialized structures called the menisci. But these “meniscal” and “mechanical” symptoms do not reflect what surgeons will find at knee arthroscopy, reports a study in The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio in partnership with Wolters Kluwer.

13-Jan-2021 12:05 PM EST
Study shows sharp decline in cancer screenings and diagnoses during the first COVID-19 surge
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

In one of the first studies to examine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on cancer diagnoses, researchers at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center document a substantial decline in cancer and precancer diagnoses at the Northeast’s largest health care system during the first peak of the pandemic because of a drop in the number of cancer screening tests performed.

12-Jan-2021 3:05 PM EST
Cardiac Rehabilitation is Underused Across the Country. One Simple Change Could Fix That.
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Making doctors opt out from prescribing cardiac rehabilitation instead of opting in increased referrals by roughly 70 percent

12-Jan-2021 11:00 AM EST
Scientists Take Important Step Toward Using Retinal Cell Transplants to Treat Blindness
Mount Sinai Health System

Retinal cells derived from a cadaver human eye survived when transplanted into the eyes of primate models, an important advance in the development of cell therapy to treat blindness, according to a study published on January 14 in Stem Cell Reports.

Newswise: Behaviors Surrounding Oral Sex May Increase HPV-Related Cancer Risk
Released: 14-Jan-2021 10:10 AM EST
Behaviors Surrounding Oral Sex May Increase HPV-Related Cancer Risk
Johns Hopkins Medicine

A wide breadth of behaviors surrounding oral sex may affect the risk of oral HPV infection and of a virus-associated head and neck cancer that can be spread through this route, a new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center suggests. These findings add nuance to the connection between oral sex and oropharyngeal cancer — tumors that occur in the mouth and throat — and could help inform research and public health efforts aimed at preventing this disease.

12-Jan-2021 1:55 PM EST
Restricting Malt Liquor Sales is Linked to Reductions in Neighborhood Crime
Research Society on Alcoholism

Restricting the sale of malt liquor beer can help reduce crime in some communities, according to a new study. Malt liquor beer — high in alcohol content, low cost, and widely sold in liquor stores and convenience stores — is linked to heavy drinking, public inebriation, disorderly conduct, drug activity and other crimes. Consequently, since the 1990s, some cities have restricted its sale. In Washington state, certain urban neighborhoods were designated Alcohol Impact Areas and targeted with policies including restrictions on sales of malt liquor and similar products. Unpublished evaluations of these interventions have suggested positive social and health effects, but the research on crime impacts has been limited, with mixed findings. The study in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research found that malt liquor sales restrictions are associated with declining urban crime.

12-Jan-2021 1:45 PM EST
People Feeling Angry Are Willing to Purchase Alcohol at Higher Prices But May Not Know It
Research Society on Alcoholism

People who’ve been provoked to anger are willing to purchase alcohol at higher prices, but may not be aware of their increased urge to drink, according to a new study. Anger, hostility, and aggression are known to relate to drinking, with anger a risk factor for heavy alcohol use. Building on previous studies that have deliberately manipulated emotional states to explore their effects on substance use, researchers at Wayne State University, Michigan, designed an experiment that could help clarify whether anger can motivate people to drink . For the study in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, the investigators sought to induce anger in participants and measure the effect of that anger on the desire to drink. They used two measures of drinking urges: self-reported alcohol craving and a behavioral task that assesses people’s motivation to drink.

Newswise: Researchers Link Cellular Transport Pathway to Aggressive Brain Cancer
7-Jan-2021 9:00 AM EST
Researchers Link Cellular Transport Pathway to Aggressive Brain Cancer
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at McGill University have identified a new cellular pathway that limits the growth and spread of brain tumors by controlling the recycling of cell surface receptor proteins. The study, which will be published January 14 in the Journal of Cell Biology (JCB), suggests that the pathway, which involves a protein called Rab35, is defective in many patients with glioblastoma and that restoring Rab35’s activity could be a new therapeutic strategy for this deadly form of brain cancer.

Released: 14-Jan-2021 9:55 AM EST
Males of all ages more affected by COVID-19 than females, study finds
PLOS

Males are more likely to test positive for COVID-19, more likely to have complications and more likely to die from the virus than females, independent of age, according to a new study published this week in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Farhaan Vahidy of Houston Methodist Research Institute, US, and colleagues.

Newswise: A Rift in the Retina May Help Repair the Optic Nerve
Released: 14-Jan-2021 9:00 AM EST
A Rift in the Retina May Help Repair the Optic Nerve
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In experiments in mouse tissues and human cells, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have found that removing a membrane that lines the back of the eye may improve the success rate for regrowing nerve cells damaged by blinding diseases. The findings are specifically aimed at discovering new ways to reverse vision loss caused by glaucoma and other diseases that affect the optic nerve, the information highway from the eye to the brain.

Released: 14-Jan-2021 9:00 AM EST
Moffitt Researchers Discover Biochemical Pathway That Protects Cells from Ferroptosis Cell Death
Moffitt Cancer Center

In an article published in Cell Metabolism, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers report on a newly discovered biochemical pathway that protects cells from a type of cell death called ferroptosis.

Newswise:Video Embedded vaccine-distribution-newswise-live-event-for-january-13th-2pm-et
VIDEO
Released: 14-Jan-2021 8:55 AM EST
VIDEO AND TRANSCRIPT AVAILABLE: Vaccine Distribution: Newswise Live Event for January 13th, 2PM ET
Newswise

Experts will discuss and take questions on COVID-19 vaccine distribution.

Newswise: Hackensack Meridian Health Foundations Recognized by the Association for Healthcare Philanthropy as High Performers
Released: 14-Jan-2021 8:05 AM EST
Hackensack Meridian Health Foundations Recognized by the Association for Healthcare Philanthropy as High Performers
Hackensack Meridian Health

Hackensack Meridian Health is pleased to announce that Hackensack Meridian – Meridian Health Foundation and Hackensack Meridian Hackensack University Medical Center Foundation have achieved High Performer status within the Association for Healthcare Philanthropy’s (AHP) 2020 Report on Giving.

Newswise: Crystal Denlinger Named Chief Scientific Officer for National Comprehensive Cancer Network
Released: 14-Jan-2021 8:05 AM EST
Crystal Denlinger Named Chief Scientific Officer for National Comprehensive Cancer Network
National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®)

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) announces Crystal S. Denlinger, MD, FACP, as incoming Senior Vice President, Chief Scientific Officer. Dr. Denlinger will help to steer strategic direction for the nonprofit as well as oversee the NCCN Oncology Research Program (ORP).

Newswise: NUS scientists find new mechanism of cancer formation
Released: 14-Jan-2021 8:05 AM EST
NUS scientists find new mechanism of cancer formation
National University of Singapore

A team of scientists at the National University of Singapore (NUS), led by Dr Polly Leilei Chen from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore and Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine at NUS, has discovered a previously unknown mechanism of cancer formation, the understanding of which may lead to more effective treatment. They discover that doing nothing to the DNA code of the COPA gene can promote cancer.

Newswise: Climate Change is Hurting Children’s Diets, Global Study Finds
11-Jan-2021 7:55 AM EST
Climate Change is Hurting Children’s Diets, Global Study Finds
University of Vermont

A first-of-its-kind, international study of 107,000 children finds that higher temperatures are an equal or even greater contributor to child malnutrition than the traditional culprits of poverty, inadequate sanitation, and poor education. The 19-nation study is the largest investigation to date of the relationship between our changing climate and children's diet diversity. Of the six regions examined--in Asia, Africa, and Central and South America--five had significant reductions in diet diversity associated with higher temperatures.

Newswise: Rosemarie Arena, M.D., Gastroenterologist, Joins Hackensack Meridian Mountainside Medical Group
Released: 13-Jan-2021 5:20 PM EST
Rosemarie Arena, M.D., Gastroenterologist, Joins Hackensack Meridian Mountainside Medical Group
Hackensack Meridian Health

Hackensack Meridian Mountainside Medical Group announced today that Rosemarie Arena, M.D., has joined the practice, expanding their gastroenterology group.

Released: 13-Jan-2021 5:20 PM EST
NurseNow Staffing Joins Decentralized Trials & Research Alliance (DTRA) To Democratize And Accelerate Clinical Trials
NurseNow Staffing

NurseNow Staffing is pleased to announce becoming a founding member of an historic alliance of fifty life sciences and healthcare organizations that seeks to accelerate the broad adoption of patient-focused, decentralized clinical trials and research.

Newswise: New Combination Drug Therapy Offers Hope Against Methamphetamine Addiction
Released: 13-Jan-2021 5:05 PM EST
New Combination Drug Therapy Offers Hope Against Methamphetamine Addiction
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – Jan. 13, 2021 – A new treatment that combines two existing medications may provide long-sought relief for many battling debilitating methamphetamine use disorder, according to a study to be published tomorrow in The New England Journal of Medicine.

Newswise:Video Embedded getting-ready-for-a-future-pandemic-worse-than-covid-19
VIDEO
Released: 13-Jan-2021 4:55 PM EST
Getting Ready For A Future Pandemic Worse Than COVID-19
American Public Health Association (APHA)

Mark Ryan, from WHO, points out that we may still not facing what “the big one”. I met with Dr Renuka Tiperneni (U. Michigan), Dr Jeremy Greene (Johns Hopkins), and Dr. Rebekah Gee (Louisiana State U) to explore how public health can be galvanized so that a new administration best prepares the country to face a future pandemic that is worse than Covid-19.

Newswise: The Medical Minute: How you can donate blood safely now
Released: 13-Jan-2021 4:20 PM EST
The Medical Minute: How you can donate blood safely now
Penn State Health

You have the power to save lives today. January is National Blood Donation Month. Learn the benefits of donating—and how local organizations ensure donation is safe—in this week’s Penn State Health Medical Minute.

8-Jan-2021 4:30 PM EST
Memory May Be Preserved in Condition with Brain Changes Similar to Alzheimer’s Disease
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Primary progressive aphasia is a rare neurodegenerative condition characterized by prominent language problems that worsen over time. About 40% of people with the condition have underlying Alzheimer’s disease. But a new study has found that people with the condition may not develop the memory problems associated with Alzheimer’s disease. The study is published in the January 13, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Released: 13-Jan-2021 3:35 PM EST
KU studies show breakfast can improve basketball shooting performance
University of Kansas

Parents around the world have long told us that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. Soon, basketball coaches may join them.

Newswise: Healthcare Innovation Eases Burden on ICU Staff
Released: 13-Jan-2021 3:35 PM EST
Healthcare Innovation Eases Burden on ICU Staff
Cedars-Sinai

Throughout the COVID-19 crisis, Cedars-Sinai employees have stepped-up and stepped-in to support patients and colleagues alike. And while there has been no shortage of selflessness, one group of volunteers shines a bright light on both the innovation and teamwork spurring from the past 10 months of treating the sickest of patients.

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Released: 13-Jan-2021 3:25 PM EST
Is the COVID-19 vaccine safe for nursing mothers?
Mary Ann Liebert

The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine (ABM) does not recommend cessation of breastfeeding for individuals who are vaccinated against COVID-19.

Newswise: 253165_web.jpg
Released: 13-Jan-2021 3:20 PM EST
New study suggests that college campuses are COVID-19 superspreaders
Taylor & Francis

College campuses are at risk of becoming COVID-19 superspreaders for their entire county, according to a new vast study which shows the striking danger of the first two weeks of school in particular.

Newswise: A Mother’s Fight for Her Son After Brain Injury
Released: 13-Jan-2021 3:15 PM EST
A Mother’s Fight for Her Son After Brain Injury
Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

Peter Davey was admitted to the hospital after a hypoxic brain injury. Neurosurgeons including Dr. Gaurav Gupta at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School did not think Peter would survive, and even after performing life-saving surgery, it was not clear that he would be able to regain the ability to walk, talk, read or write. A year later, Peter has regained all his mental and physical abilities. Dr. Gupta attributes this outcome not only to Peter’s determination and stamina, but also the resilience of his mother.

Newswise: Suo_WEB.jpg
Released: 13-Jan-2021 3:05 PM EST
FSU expert available to discuss new COVID-19 variants
Florida State University

By: Bill Wellock | Published: January 13, 2021 | 2:12 pm | SHARE: New variants of the COVID-19 virus have appeared around the world, including a more contagious variant of the COVID-19 virus that was first identified in the United Kingdom. Other variants have been identified in South Africa, Nigeria and Japan.Viruses constantly change through mutation.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 19-Jan-2021 11:00 AM EST Released to reporters: 13-Jan-2021 3:05 PM EST

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 19-Jan-2021 11:00 AM EST The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Released: 13-Jan-2021 2:55 PM EST
High insulin levels during childhood a risk for mental health problems in adulthood, study suggests
University of Cambridge

Researchers have shown that the link between physical and mental illness is closer than previously thought. Certain changes in physical health, which are detectable in childhood, are linked with the development of mental illness in adulthood.

Released: 13-Jan-2021 2:50 PM EST
Can menopause be blamed for increased forgetfulness and lack of attention?
North American Menopause Society (NAMS)

If you're a bit more forgetful or having more difficulty processing complex concepts than in the past, the problem may be your menopause stage.

Released: 13-Jan-2021 2:30 PM EST
Is it Safe to Perform CPR During the COVID-19 Pandemic?
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A new study analyzes the potential transmission risk of airborne respiratory pathogens during bystander-initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation, or CPR.

Released: 13-Jan-2021 2:30 PM EST
Adults with Cerebral Palsy Need Better Access to Health Care
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Once viewed as a pediatric condition, patients with cerebral palsy are aging, but the health care system is not prepared to offer them the care they need.

Newswise: New Insights Into the Control of Inflammation
Released: 13-Jan-2021 2:10 PM EST
New Insights Into the Control of Inflammation
Wistar Institute

Wistar scientists discovered that EGR1 inhibits expression of pro-inflammatory genes in macrophages. The discovery expands the understanding of how macrophages are set off and deactivated in the inflammatory process, which is critical in many normal and pathological conditions.

Newswise: A niche for the eye
Released: 13-Jan-2021 2:00 PM EST
A niche for the eye
Stowers Institute for Medical Research

What if the degenerative eye conditions that lead to glaucoma, corneal dystrophy, and cataracts could be detected and treated before vision is impaired? Recent findings from the lab of Investigator Ting Xie, PhD, at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research point to the ciliary body as a key to unlocking this possibility.

Newswise:Video Embedded depression-and-stress-could-dampen-efficacy-of-covid-19-vaccines
VIDEO
Released: 13-Jan-2021 2:00 PM EST
Depression and Stress Could Dampen Efficacy of COVID-19 Vaccines
Association for Psychological Science

Health behaviors and emotional stressors can alter the body’s ability to develop an immune response to vaccines, including—potentially—the new COVID-19 vaccines. Simple interventions, including exercising and getting a good night’s sleep in the 24 hours before vaccination, may maximize the vaccine’s initial effectiveness.

Released: 13-Jan-2021 2:00 PM EST
COVID-19 vaccine creates incentive to improve our health
Ohio State University

While we wait for our turn to get vaccinated against SARS-CoV-2, we could – and probably should – use the time to make sure we bring our healthiest emotional and physical selves to the treatment, a new review of previous research suggests.

13-Jan-2021 7:50 AM EST
CHOP and Penn Researchers Identify Nanoparticles that Could Be Used in Therapeutic mRNA Delivery before Birth
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the School of Engineering and Applied Science at the University of Pennsylvania have identified ionizable lipid nanoparticles that could be used to deliver mRNA as part of fetal therapy. The proof-of-concept study, published today in Science Advances, engineered and screened a number of lipid nanoparticle formulations for targeting mouse fetal organs and has laid the groundwork for testing potential therapies to treat genetic diseases before birth.

Newswise:Video Embedded vaping-disrupts-blood-air-flow-matching-in-asymptomatic-users
VIDEO
Released: 13-Jan-2021 1:50 PM EST
Vaping Disrupts Blood, Air Flow Matching in Asymptomatic Users
American Physiological Society (APS)

There is more evidence that vaping causes abnormal lung function in young, otherwise healthy people.

Released: 13-Jan-2021 1:45 PM EST
AAPM Advances Best Practices for Patient Safety in X-Ray Imaging
American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM)

Since April 2019, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine has championed a critical way to make X-ray imaging safer and more effective by discontinuing the long-standing practice of placing leaded shields over patient gonads. Today, the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements released a statement recommending the discontinuation of routine shielding of patient gonads during X-ray imaging exams and AAPM stands ready to help imaging providers, patients and caregivers to understand and adopt these new best practices – practices that will ensure safer and higher-quality X-ray exams.

Newswise: Researchers receive DOD funding to expand study of investigational drug to prevent ARDS in COVID-19 patients
Released: 13-Jan-2021 1:40 PM EST
Researchers receive DOD funding to expand study of investigational drug to prevent ARDS in COVID-19 patients
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Researchers evaluating whether an investigational oral drug, vadadustat, can help prevent acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in COVID-19 patients were awarded $5.1 million in funding from the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) to expand the Phase II clinical trial at UTHealth.

Released: 13-Jan-2021 1:30 PM EST
Study: Many Summer Camps Don’t Require Childhood Immunizations
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Nearly half of summer camps surveyed by researchers didn’t have official policies requiring campers be vaccinated, according to findings led by Michigan Medicine C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital in JAMA Pediatrics. Of 378 camps represented, just 174 reportedly had immunization policies for campers and 133 (39%) mandated staffers be vaccinated.

Newswise: Lyndhurst Woman Saves Four Lives Through ‘Good Samaritan’ Living Kidney Donation at Hackensack University Medical Center
Released: 13-Jan-2021 1:05 PM EST
Lyndhurst Woman Saves Four Lives Through ‘Good Samaritan’ Living Kidney Donation at Hackensack University Medical Center
Hackensack Meridian Health

On December 9, 2020, Gianna Graw saved four lives and became the first patient to make a “good samaritan” kidney donation through Hackensack University Medical Center’s partnership with National Kidney Registry (NKR), an organization that facilitates living donor kidney transplants.

Released: 13-Jan-2021 12:55 PM EST
Cornell helps develop NYS effort on telehealth reform
Cornell University

Gov. Andrew Cuomo has accepted new proposals to expand access to telehealth – developed with the Reimagine New York Commission Telehealth Working Group, co-chaired by Cornell University President Martha E. Pollack.


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