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Released: 10-Aug-2022 8:00 AM EDT
NSF Awards Georgetown University $12.5M to Establish Institute for Emerging Virus Research
Georgetown University Medical Center

The National Science Foundation has awarded Georgetown University $12.5 million to lead a global team of scientists in establishing a collaborative institute designed to advance research and education around viral emergence -- the process of viruses jumping from animals to humans.

5-Aug-2022 4:05 PM EDT
Multiple sclerosis drug works in a surprising way
American Chemical Society (ACS)

Drugs called interferon betas are common treatments for multiple sclerosis. Interferon beta, a protein known to contain a zinc-binding pocket, is thought to reduce proinflammatory molecules in MS patients. But researchers now report in ACS Chemical Neuroscience that the molecule reduces the binding of three components — zinc, C-peptide and albumin — to red blood cells.

   
5-Aug-2022 3:05 PM EDT
New drug candidate fights off more than 300 drug-resistant bacteria
American Chemical Society (ACS)

Urinary tract infections are common, yet can be tough to treat as the bacteria that cause them become resistant to many antibiotics. In ACS Central Science, researchers report a new molecule that inhibits drug-resistant bacteria in lab experiments, as well as in mice with pneumonia and UTIs.

   
Released: 10-Aug-2022 7:00 AM EDT
Biophysical Society Announces the Results of its 2022 Elections
Biophysical Society

ROCKVILLE, MD – Gabriela K. Popescu has been elected President-elect of the Biophysical Society (BPS). She will assume the office of President-elect at the 2023 Annual Meeting in San Diego, California and begin her term as President during the 2024 Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Popescu is a Professor of Biochemistry at the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University of Buffalo, State University of New York (SUNY).

Newswise: New Study Shows Two Million Life-Years Lost and $21 Billion in Lost Earnings Annually Due to Smoking Associated Cancer Deaths
8-Aug-2022 1:05 PM EDT
New Study Shows Two Million Life-Years Lost and $21 Billion in Lost Earnings Annually Due to Smoking Associated Cancer Deaths
American Cancer Society (ACS)

A new study led by researchers at the American Cancer Society reports nearly 123,000 cancer deaths, or close to 30 percent of all cancer deaths, were from cigarette smoking in the United States in 2019, leading to more than two million Person-Years of Lost Life (PYLL) and nearly $21 billion in annual lost earnings. These losses were disproportionately higher in states with weaker tobacco control policies in the South and Midwest. The results were published today in the International Journal of Cancer.

Newswise: Tiny Optical Sensors Could Put an End to Hospital Bed Sores
Released: 9-Aug-2022 10:05 PM EDT
Tiny Optical Sensors Could Put an End to Hospital Bed Sores
University of South Australia

Millions of older hospital patients and nursing home residents suffer excruciating bed sores each year, some of which are fatal. Now, new research led by the University of South Australia could put an end to that with the development of tiny smart bed sensors embedded in hospital mattresses.

   
Newswise: How Wastewater Surveillance Can Mitigate Monkeypox Spread: Expert Available
Released: 9-Aug-2022 8:05 PM EDT
How Wastewater Surveillance Can Mitigate Monkeypox Spread: Expert Available
University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV)

Just when it seemed like we could sit back and breathe a sigh of relief from declining COVID-19 rates in Nevada, another virus started making headlines: Monkeypox. Local COVID cases have been on a downward trajectory for more than a month. But a wastewater surveillance program led by UNLV Kirk Kerkorian School of Medicine professor and infectious disease expert Edwin Oh has started tracking monkeypox,making Southern Nevada among the first few metropolitan areas nationwide to begin searching the sewers for the emerging virus.

Newswise: Experimental Drug Reduces Risk of Death From Blood Vessel Rupture in Mice
Released: 9-Aug-2022 6:05 PM EDT
Experimental Drug Reduces Risk of Death From Blood Vessel Rupture in Mice
Washington University in St. Louis

Nanoparticles (red) are taken up by immune cells (green with blue nuclei). Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that an experimental nanoparticle-based drug therapy protects mice from sudden death due to the rupture of a major blood vessel in the abdomen, pointing the way toward a new strategy for treating deadly abdominal aortic aneurysms.

Released: 9-Aug-2022 6:05 PM EDT
American Academy of Dermatology’s Statement on the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Report on Environmental Impact of Currently Marketed Sunscreens and Potential Human Impacts of Changes in Sunscreen Usage
American Academy of Dermatology

The American Academy of Dermatology supports the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s recommendation that the U.S. EPA conducts an ecological risk assessment of UV filters to characterize possible risks to aquatic ecosystems and the species that live in them. As the report released today makes clear, the science in this area is limited and inconclusive.

Released: 9-Aug-2022 5:05 PM EDT
New model can predict best drug combinations for osteoporosis
eLife

The model, described today in eLife, may help improve outcomes for patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis and reduce the risks of side effects by helping physicians build more personalised treatment regimes.

Released: 9-Aug-2022 4:55 PM EDT
OU study describes new ‘molecular tool’ to trigger targeted immune responses
University of Oklahoma

A research team at the University of Oklahoma published a study in the journal Advanced Science that presents a new approach to triggering an adaptive immune response.

Released: 9-Aug-2022 4:50 PM EDT
Universal vaccine needed to prevent future COVID-19 waves, study suggests
eLife

Their findings highlight the need for more proactive planning and preparedness for future variants of concern (VOCs), including the development of a universal vaccine that can block SARS-CoV-2 infection as well as prevent severe disease.

Released: 9-Aug-2022 4:40 PM EDT
New test may predict COVID-19 immunity
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Most people in the United States have some degree of immune protection against Covid-19, either from vaccination, infection, or a combination of the two. But, just how much protection does any individual person have?

Newswise: Uncovering the secret of insulin growth factor ternary complex
Released: 9-Aug-2022 4:20 PM EDT
Uncovering the secret of insulin growth factor ternary complex
Institute for Basic Science

Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) is a hormone that greatly influences growth in fetuses and children, but also body maintenance and metabolism in adults.

Released: 9-Aug-2022 4:10 PM EDT
Measuring the “woodwork effect” in medical insurance
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Not everyone who qualifies for health insurance signs up for it. Consider Medicaid, the national health insurance plan for low-income people. Across the U.S., about 14 percent of eligible adults and 7 percent of eligible children are not enrolled in Med

Released: 9-Aug-2022 4:05 PM EDT
Vasculitis Foundation, International Organization for Vasculitis Community, Responding to the News of Ashton Kutcher’s Diagnosis of Vasculitis
Vasculitis Foundation

The Vasculitis Foundation applauds Ashton Kutcher for publicly sharing his diagnosis of vasculitis.

   
Released: 9-Aug-2022 4:05 PM EDT
New drug screening tool to fight the next pandemic
Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)

Following two years of severe restrictions, everyone is eager to be done with the coronavirus pandemic. It’s tempting to think that COVID-19 is history, but the coronavirus and other viruses will regularly resurface.

Newswise: See-through zebrafish, new imaging method put blood stem cells in high-resolution spotlight
Released: 9-Aug-2022 4:05 PM EDT
See-through zebrafish, new imaging method put blood stem cells in high-resolution spotlight
University of Wisconsin-Madison

MADISON — For the first time, researchers can get a high-resolution view of single blood stem cells thanks to a little help from microscopy and zebrafish.Researchers at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and the University of California San Diego have developed a method for scientists to track a single blood stem cell in a live organism and then describe the ultrastructure, or architecture, of that same cell using electron microscopy.

Released: 9-Aug-2022 2:45 PM EDT
Legalized Cannabis Linked to Fewer Synthetic Cannabinoid Poisonings
Washington State University

Synthetic cannabinoids, dangerous designer drugs known by such street names as K2, Spice or AK-47, appear to have less appeal in states that have legalized the natural form of cannabis.

Newswise: A Mutated Eye Offers a Glimpse of a Key Protein for Preventing Cancer
Released: 9-Aug-2022 2:25 PM EDT
A Mutated Eye Offers a Glimpse of a Key Protein for Preventing Cancer
Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University - OIST

Researchers investigated the role of a protein that has been hypothesized to regulate the cell cycle, initiated DNA repair, and suppress tumors.

Newswise: Q&A: Professor Offers Prescription to Better Explain Climate and Health
Released: 9-Aug-2022 2:05 PM EDT
Q&A: Professor Offers Prescription to Better Explain Climate and Health
University of Oregon

Health professionals could better communicate the health effects of climate change by using information that promotes action rather than confusion, according to a recent article by a University of Oregon researcher.

     
Newswise: Cedars-Sinai Creates Computer Models of Brain Cells
Released: 9-Aug-2022 2:05 PM EDT
Cedars-Sinai Creates Computer Models of Brain Cells
Cedars-Sinai

Cedars-Sinai investigators have created bio-realistic and complex computer models of individual brain cells—in unparalleled quantity. Their research, published today in the peer-reviewed journal Cell Reports, details how these models could one day answer questions about neurological disorders—and even human intellect—that aren’t possible to explore through biological experiments.

Newswise: UTSW Scientists Identify Pathway to Curb Spread of Brain Cancer
Released: 9-Aug-2022 2:05 PM EDT
UTSW Scientists Identify Pathway to Curb Spread of Brain Cancer
UT Southwestern Medical Center

UT Southwestern researchers have identified a molecular pathway responsible for the spread of glioblastoma to surrounding tissue in the brain, as well as an existing drug that curbed tumor growth in animal models. The findings, published in Nature Cell Biology, have led to a clinical trial that could offer new hope to patients with glioblastoma, the most common form of brain cancer in adults that kills hundreds of thousands of people worldwide each year.

Newswise: How College Students Perceive Academic Stress Affects Their Mental Well-Being
Released: 9-Aug-2022 2:05 PM EDT
How College Students Perceive Academic Stress Affects Their Mental Well-Being
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Students who are non-binary, female or in their second year of college are most affected by academic stress, a Rutgers study finds

   
Newswise: UTSW Is Leading the Way Toward Better Screening for Liver Cancer
Released: 9-Aug-2022 2:05 PM EDT
UTSW Is Leading the Way Toward Better Screening for Liver Cancer
UT Southwestern Medical Center

UT Southwestern will lead a multisite initiative funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to identify biomarkers to improve risk assessment and early detection of hepatocellular cancer (HCC), the most common form of liver cancer, among patients with cirrhosis.

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This news release is embargoed until 15-Aug-2022 5:00 PM EDT Released to reporters: 9-Aug-2022 2:05 PM EDT

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Released: 9-Aug-2022 1:45 PM EDT
Consider yourself a foodie? Dig into these latest headlines from the Food Science channel
Newswise

Below are some of the latest articles that have been added to the Food Science channel on Newswise, a free source for journalists.

       
Released: 9-Aug-2022 1:30 PM EDT
How will the pending budget bill reduce drug prices for Americans?
University of Michigan

The Inflation Reduction Act contains provisions that are expected to lower drug costs for millions of Americans by allowing Medicare to negotiate some drug prices and by limiting the amount of out-of-pocket drug costs for Medicare Part D patients.

Released: 9-Aug-2022 1:05 PM EDT
Mount Sinai Awarded Three-Year Grant to Explore Therapeutic Approaches to KRAS Mutant Lung Tumors
Mount Sinai Health System

Mount Sinai is leading a team of lung cancer researchers that has been awarded a three-year, $500,000 grant from Stand Up To Cancer® (SU2C) to explore therapeutic approaches to lung tumors with mutations in the KRAS gene, an undertaking that could have a significant impact for a large population of cancer patients who currently lack effective treatment options.

Released: 9-Aug-2022 1:05 PM EDT
Whether it’s medical records, blood or tissue, patients want to know if researchers may use something from them
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Many members of the public want to know if their health information or samples from their bodies will be used in research or to help develop new biomedical products, a new study finds. That’s especially true if their data and biospecimens might get used by commercial companies, or if identifying information will be attached when it’s shared.

Released: 9-Aug-2022 1:05 PM EDT
Gene editing via CRISPR/Cas9 can lead to cell toxicity and genome instability
Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona)

Researchers at IRB Barcelona identify critical spots on the genome where gene editing could cause an unwanted response, and they provide recommendations for safer approaches.

Newswise: New Academic Global Surgery Fellowship will support surgical systems and skills in Hawassa, Ethiopia
Released: 9-Aug-2022 12:30 PM EDT
New Academic Global Surgery Fellowship will support surgical systems and skills in Hawassa, Ethiopia
American College of Surgeons (ACS)

The American College of Surgeons (ACS) has partnered with three academic health systems to develop a new Academic Global Surgery Fellowship to address surgical disparities in underserved populations.

Newswise: Mental health challenges contributed to weight gain for people with obesity during COVID-19
Released: 9-Aug-2022 12:05 PM EDT
Mental health challenges contributed to weight gain for people with obesity during COVID-19
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Over the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic, almost 30% of patients with obesity gained more than 5% of their body weight, and 1 in 7 gained more than 10%. While diet and exercise habits were factors, people with the highest levels of stress, anxiety, and depression reported the most weight gain, UT Southwestern researchers reported in the journal Obesity.

Newswise: Body Posture Affects How Oral Drugs Absorbed by Stomach
5-Aug-2022 3:10 PM EDT
Body Posture Affects How Oral Drugs Absorbed by Stomach
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

A common method of administering drugs is orally, by swallowing a pill or capsule. But oral administration is the most complex way for the human body to absorb an active pharmaceutical ingredient, because the bioavailability of the drug in the gastrointestinal tract depends on the medication's ingredients and the stomach's dynamic physiological environment. In Physics of Fluids, researchers from employ a biomimetic in-silico simulator based on the realistic anatomy and morphology of the stomach – a "StomachSim" – to investigate and quantify the effect of body posture and stomach motility on drug bioavailability.

   
Newswise: Kentucky Childrens Hospital celebrates 25 years of serving Kentucky’s children
Released: 9-Aug-2022 10:05 AM EDT
Kentucky Childrens Hospital celebrates 25 years of serving Kentucky’s children
University of Kentucky

On Aug. 23, Kentucky Children’s Hospital (KCH) will celebrate its 25th anniversary of serving the children of the Commonwealth. The hospital has grown since 1997, in both physical capacity and in the types of specialty care for every child, from infant to young adults.

   
Newswise: Wake Forest University School of Medicine Develops Digital Platform to Better Care for Stroke Patients
Released: 9-Aug-2022 10:05 AM EDT
Wake Forest University School of Medicine Develops Digital Platform to Better Care for Stroke Patients
Wake Forest University School of Medicine

With physicians and patients looking for ways to extend health care beyond the traditional doctor's office, remote monitoring and care coordination can provide increased support to patients who suffer a major health event such as a stroke. To address this growing need, clinical researchers and bioinformatic experts at Wake Forest University School of Medicine and stroke experts at Atrium Health Wake Forest Baptist's Comprehensive Stroke Center, have created COMPASS-CP, a digital health platform that can be embedded within electronic health records.

Released: 9-Aug-2022 10:05 AM EDT
Nurse-led Initiatives Improve Cardiac Care in Underserved Communities
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN)

Nurses at nine hospitals developed initiatives to address diverse healthcare challenges in their cardiac surgery critical care or progressive care units, with noteworthy clinical and operational results.

Newswise: Study Finds Genetic Method for Identifying Hundreds of Disease Agents ‘Promising’
Released: 9-Aug-2022 10:00 AM EDT
Study Finds Genetic Method for Identifying Hundreds of Disease Agents ‘Promising’
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In the pursuit of accurate diagnoses for illnesses, doctors have traditionally used multiple methods to try to identify the bacterium, virus, fungus or other pathogen responsible for an infection.

Newswise: Nearly 70% of Americans admit they have lost sleep due to environmental worries
Released: 9-Aug-2022 10:00 AM EDT
Nearly 70% of Americans admit they have lost sleep due to environmental worries
American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM)

A survey from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) reveals that most Americans (69%) have lost sleep due to environmental worries. Notably, one-half of those aged 18-24 claim to always, almost always or often lose sleep compared to 10% of Baby Boomers and the Silent Generation.

   
Newswise: Children’s Hospital Los Angeles Finds Differences in How Doctors, Caregivers and Patients Report Side Effects of Cancer Therapy
Released: 9-Aug-2022 9:00 AM EDT
Children’s Hospital Los Angeles Finds Differences in How Doctors, Caregivers and Patients Report Side Effects of Cancer Therapy
Children's Hospital Los Angeles

A recent study reveals differences in how in symptom toxicity is reported for children receiving cancer treatment in clinical trials. Doctors often underestimate or miss a child’s symptoms, while caregivers tend to overestimate symptoms.

Newswise: CUVET Answers All Your Questions Related to “Rabies” while Campaigning for Vaccination in High-Risk Groups to Prevent Fatal Communicable Disease
Released: 9-Aug-2022 8:55 AM EDT
CUVET Answers All Your Questions Related to “Rabies” while Campaigning for Vaccination in High-Risk Groups to Prevent Fatal Communicable Disease
Chulalongkorn University

Chula Veterinary Science joined the World Rabies Day campaign on September 28, to educate and raise awareness about rabies, and organize vaccinations for veterinarian science students who volunteered in the community, while emphasizing that people at risk should be vaccinated regularly against rabies.

   
Newswise: ‘Guardian of the Genome’ and the ‘WASp’ team up to repair DNA damage
Released: 9-Aug-2022 8:05 AM EDT
‘Guardian of the Genome’ and the ‘WASp’ team up to repair DNA damage
Penn State College of Medicine

College of Medicine researchers found that replication protein A works with an ally called the WAS protein to ‘save the day’ and prevent potential cancers from developing.

Released: 9-Aug-2022 8:05 AM EDT
Study Uncovers How Blind and Visually Impaired Individuals Navigate Social Challenges
North Carolina State University

A recent study highlights the range of uncomfortable situations people living with blindness or visual impairment encounter due to interpersonal communication challenges, and outlines strategies people with visual impairment use to navigate these situations.

   
Released: 9-Aug-2022 8:05 AM EDT
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Announces Biomedical Laureates to Address Health Disparities in Environmental Health, Cancer, and Emergency Medicine
Mount Sinai Health System

The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai announced today the appointment of three new Laureates as part of its Biomedical Laureates Program, furthering its institutional commitment to broadening diversity and mentorship opportunities.

Newswise: UNH Awarded $2.8 Million to Develop Robots to Care for People with Alzheimer’s and Dementia
Released: 9-Aug-2022 8:05 AM EDT
UNH Awarded $2.8 Million to Develop Robots to Care for People with Alzheimer’s and Dementia
University of New Hampshire

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire will receive a five-year grant totaling $2.8 million from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to develop and test social assistive robots to aid in the care of individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia in the comfort of their own homes.

   
Released: 9-Aug-2022 8:00 AM EDT
A role for cell ‘antennae’ in managing dopamine signals in the brain
Ohio State University

A historically overlooked rod-like projection present on nearly every cell type in the human body may finally be getting its scientific due: A new study has found that these appendages on neurons in the brain have a key role in ensuring a specific dopamine receptor’s signals are properly received.

Released: 9-Aug-2022 8:00 AM EDT
Research to Prevent Blindness and the American Academy of Ophthalmology Award New Research Grants to Improve Eye Care
Research to Prevent Blindness

Award recipients to use the American Academy of Ophthalmology IRIS® Registry (Intelligent Research in Sight) clinical database to improve care for all patients


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