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Newswise: Failed Cancer Drug Looks Promising For Scleroderma And Other Fibrotic Conditions

Article ID: 718812

Failed Cancer Drug Looks Promising For Scleroderma And Other Fibrotic Conditions

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Sixteen years ago, a research group at Mayo Medical School published results showing that a protein called TRAIL can kill cells that cause liver fibrosis but no one seemed to follow up on these findings. Now, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine have improved on this protein and shown that it selectively kills cells that cause the hardening of skin associated with scleroderma, effectively reversing the condition in mice genetically engineered to mimic the disease. A report on these results was published earlier this year in Nature Communications.

Released:
12-Sep-2019 9:00 AM EDT
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Newswise: Kim Kardashian West impacted by autoimmune disease, a major women’s health issue.

Article ID: 718808

Kim Kardashian West impacted by autoimmune disease, a major women’s health issue.

American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA)

Named a major women’s health issue by the National Institutes of Health’s Office of Research on Women’s Health, it is no surprise that the number of celebrities impacted by autoimmune disease is on the rise. Kim Kardashian West recently opened up about the impact of autoimmune disease on her life. Other celebrities with autoimmune disease diagnoses include Venus Williams, Selena Gomez, and Missy Elliott.

Released:
12-Sep-2019 9:00 AM EDT
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Pop Culture

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Article ID: 718844

Predictors of Response to Guadecitabine Found in Relapsed/Refractory AML Patients

Coriell Institute for Medical Research

Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a leukemia which arises from bone marrow tissue, often see remission following their initial treatment, but for patients whose cancer returns, there are few options. One such option is guadecitabine, a novel DNA hypomethylating drug which slows problematic changes to a person’s epigenetic profile, but the drug is ineffective in a select number of relapsed or refractory AML patients and there has not been a way to determine who stands to benefit and who does not. However, researchers from the Coriell Institute for Medical Research have found certain biomarkers which can indicate a patient’s likelihood for success. Their findings were published in Clinical Epigenetics in July.

Released:
12-Sep-2019 8:45 AM EDT
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Article ID: 718868

19th Surgeon General of the United States to Join Bloomberg School as Distinguished Policy Scholar

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Vivek H. Murthy, MD, MBA, the 19th U.S. Surgeon General and previous Vice Admiral of the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps, will join the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health as the Distinguished Policy Scholar, beginning in September 2019.

Released:
12-Sep-2019 8:30 AM EDT
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Education

Announcement

Channels:

Addiction, Drugs and Drug Abuse, Public Health

Languages:

English

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Article ID: 718870

No Long-Term Negative Effects of "Time-Out" in Children, Study Finds

Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

Contrary to misleading reports in the media and online, the disciplinary strategy of "time-out" is not associated with increased behavior problems or other long-term negative effects in children, reports a study in the Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics

Released:
12-Sep-2019 8:25 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Newswise: HCRI_Buidling_and_Sign1a.jpg

Article ID: 718871

Results Announced for Pioneering Research on the Effect of Mutant Genes on Stuttering Therapy

Hollins Communications Research Institute

Hollins Communications Research Institute (HCRI), a national center for stuttering research and therapy innovation, just completed another research initiative in collaboration with the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The study is the first to evaluate stuttering therapy outcomes among a group of stutterers who possess one of four mutant genes for stuttering in comparison to a group who do not carry the same mutant genes.

Released:
12-Sep-2019 8:20 AM EDT
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Announcement

Channels:

Cell Biology, Genetics

Languages:

English

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Article ID: 718866

Standardized Medical Residency Exam May Reduce Pool of Diverse and Qualified Candidates

Thomas Jefferson University

Test scores bias entry to radiation-oncology residency programs, and potentially other programs.

Released:
12-Sep-2019 8:05 AM EDT
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Education

Newswise: $1.25 Million Gift to Endow Chair at Jersey Shore University Medical Center

Article ID: 718817

$1.25 Million Gift to Endow Chair at Jersey Shore University Medical Center

Hackensack Meridian Health

The Hackensack Meridian Health Jersey Shore University Medical Center Foundation is pleased to announce a gift of $1.25 million from Charles Adell to create The Charles & Jackie Adell Endowed Chair in Surgical Oncology at Jersey Shore University Medical Center.

Released:
12-Sep-2019 8:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 718873

Psychedelics in Psychiatry? Studies Show Benefits of Hallucinogenic Drugs for Mental Health Treatment

Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

A growing body of evidence suggests that LSD, psilocybin, and other hallucinogenic drugs may have therapeutic benefits for patients with psychiatric disorders, according to a research review in the September issue of Journal of Psychiatric Practice. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Released:
12-Sep-2019 8:05 AM EDT
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Newswise: Two Studies Show Promise, Safety of Proton Therapy in the Brain in Children with Cancer
  • Embargo expired:
    12-Sep-2019 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 718795

Two Studies Show Promise, Safety of Proton Therapy in the Brain in Children with Cancer

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

From improving outcomes in children with brain cancer to lowering the risk of damage to the brainstem in children with central nervous system tumors, a pair of new studies published today add to the growing body of research showing the potential benefits of proton therapy.

Released:
11-Sep-2019 9:30 AM EDT
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Research Results

Channels:

Blood, Cancer, Children's Health, Healthcare, All Journal News

Languages:

English


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