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Virtual Physical Therapy After Knee Replacement Brings Similar Outcomes, Lower Costs

Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

A virtual system for in-home physical therapy (PT) provides good outcomes for patients undergoing rehabilitation following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) – with lower costs than traditional in-person PT, reports a study in the January 15, 2020 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio in partnership with Wolters Kluwer.

Channels: Bone Health, Clinical Trials, Exercise and Fitness, Healthcare, In the Home, Surgery, Technology, All Journal News,

Released:
16-Jan-2020 10:20 AM EST
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Expert Alert: Robotic repair offers benefits for many patients with leaky mitral valve

Mayo Clinic

During each human heartbeat, four valves in the heart open and close once, moving blood through the heart's chambers. But in some people, the flaps of the mitral valve between the heart's left atrium and left ventricle do not work like they should. The opening may become narrow, or more commonly, the flaps may prolapse and not line up properly.

Channels: Cardiovascular Health, Healthcare, Heart Disease, Surgery, Technology,

Released:
16-Jan-2020 10:10 AM EST
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CenExel Leads Industry in Psychiatric Studies at Atlanta Center for Medical Research

CenExel Clinical Research, Inc.

CenExel Clinical Research recently strengthened its psychiatric team with the recruitment of Mark N. Lerman, MD, to serve as a principal investigator for phase I-IV studies at the Atlanta Center for Medical Research (ACMR), a CenExel Center of Excellence.

Channels: Clinical Trials, Neuro, Psychology and Psychiatry,

Released:
16-Jan-2020 9:00 AM EST
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Menthol Ban Could Increase Health Equity

University of Kentucky

Current policies that include restrictions on the sale of menthol flavored tobacco and nicotine products are less likely to reach those that would benefit from them the most, according to new research from the University of Kentucky’s College of Medicine.

Channels: Addiction, All Journal News, Public Health, Smoking, Healthcare, U.S. Politics,

Released:
16-Jan-2020 9:00 AM EST
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Law and Public Policy

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Less Active Infants Had Greater Fat Accumulation, Study Finds

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Less physical activity for infants below one year of age may lead to more fat accumulation which in turn may predispose them to obesity later in life, suggests a study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Channels: All Journal News, Children's Health, Obesity, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Grant Funded News,

Released:
16-Jan-2020 8:45 AM EST
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Special delivery: McMaster physicists design ‘super-human’ red blood cells to deliver drugs to specific targets within the body

McMaster University

A team of physicists from McMaster University has developed a process to modify red blood cells so they can be used to distribute drugs throughout the body, which could specifically target infections or treat catastrophic diseases such as cancer or Alzheimer’s.

Channels: All Journal News, Alzheimer's and Dementia, Blood, Cancer, Cell Biology, Pharmaceuticals,

Released:
16-Jan-2020 8:05 AM EST
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Newswise: Why We Make (and Break) New Year’s Resolutions, and 4 Tips to Help You Achieve Your Goals

Why We Make (and Break) New Year’s Resolutions, and 4 Tips to Help You Achieve Your Goals

Nuvance Health

Research shows that as many as 50 percent of adults in the United States make New Year’s resolutions, but fewer than 10 percent keep them for more than a few months. Giving up on New Year’s resolutions is often related to three issues: difficulty breaking old habits, focusing on specific outcomes, and problems with purpose. You can increase your chances of achieving your New Year’s resolutions by setting realistic and achievable process goals that will help you form new habits, as well as following other steps for success.

Channels: Mindfulness, Psychology and Psychiatry,

Released:
16-Jan-2020 8:05 AM EST
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Newswise: Why can’t Bertrand Might cry? Scientists offer an answer: missing water channels
  • Embargo expired:
    16-Jan-2020 8:00 AM EST

Why can’t Bertrand Might cry? Scientists offer an answer: missing water channels

Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have shown that cells from children with NGLY1 deficiency—a rare disorder first described in 2012—lack sufficient water channel proteins called aquaporins. The discovery was published in Cell Reports and may help explain the disorder’s wide-ranging symptoms—including the inability to produce tears, seizures and developmental delays—and opens new avenues to find therapies to treat the disorder.

Channels: Children's Health, Genetics, Healthcare, Pharmaceuticals, Staff Picks, Cell (journal), All Journal News,

Released:
13-Jan-2020 5:05 PM EST
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Newswise: Use of hormone provides no neuroprotection in preemies

Use of hormone provides no neuroprotection in preemies

University of Washington School of Medicine

NIH-funded, nationwide study, led by a UW Medicine newborn care physician, suggests erythropoietin, while safe, may not protect against severe brain damage.

Channels: Children's Health, Healthcare, Neuro, All Journal News,

Released:
15-Jan-2020 8:10 PM EST
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