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Veggie-loving fish could be the new white meat

University of California, Irvine

A secret to survival amid rising global temperatures could be dwelling in the tidepools of the U.S. West Coast. Findings by University of California, Irvine biologists studying the genome of an unusual fish residing in those waters offer new possibilities for humans to obtain dietary protein as climate change imperils traditional sources.

Channels: All Journal News, Climate Science, Environmental Science, Marine Science, Nature,

Released:
19-Feb-2020 12:50 PM EST
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Think all BPA-free products are safe? Not so fast, scientists warn

University of Missouri, Columbia

Using "BPA-free" plastic products could be as harmful to human health -- including a developing brain -- as those products that contain the controversial chemical, suggest scientists in a new study led by the University of Missouri and published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Channels: All Journal News, Environmental Health, Food and Water Safety, Food Science, Neuro, OBGYN, Personalized Medicine, Public Health,

Released:
19-Feb-2020 11:15 AM EST
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New wearable tool helps manage mental health

Texas A&M University

Researchers at Texas A&M University are working on a smartphone app that can help students manage their mental health and connect to resources.

Channels: All Journal News, Apps, Engineering, Mental Health, Psychology and Psychiatry, Technology,

Released:
19-Feb-2020 11:05 AM EST
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Ancient gut microbiomes shed light on human evolution

Frontiers

The microbiome of our ancestors might have been more important for human evolution than previously thought, according to a new study published in Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution.

Channels: All Journal News, Archaeology and Anthropology, Evolution and Darwin, Microbiome, Nutrition,

Released:
19-Feb-2020 11:05 AM EST
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Machine Learning Identifies Personalized Brain Networks in Children

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Machine learning is helping Penn Medicine researchers identify the size and shape of brain networks in individual children, which may be useful for understanding psychiatric disorders. In a new study published in Neuron, a multidisciplinary team showed how brain networks unique to each child can predict cognition. The study is the first to show that functional neuroanatomy can vary greatly among kids, and is refined during development.

Channels: All Journal News, Artificial Intelligence, Children's Health, Mental Health, Neuro, Psychology and Psychiatry, National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), Grant Funded News,

Released:
19-Feb-2020 11:00 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    19-Feb-2020 11:00 AM EST

Right Place, Right Time

Harvard Medical School

Harvard researchers have discovered a new mechanism for how the brain and its arteries communicate to supply blood to areas of heightened neural activity. The findings enable new avenues of study into the role of this process in neurological diseases.

Channels: All Journal News, Alzheimer's and Dementia, Blood, Neuro, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Grant Funded News,

Released:
14-Feb-2020 11:00 AM EST
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Released:
19-Feb-2020 10:55 AM EST
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Newswise: New Molecular Mechanism Involved in Cellular Senescence That Modulates Inflammation and Response to Cancer Immunotherapy

New Molecular Mechanism Involved in Cellular Senescence That Modulates Inflammation and Response to Cancer Immunotherapy

Wistar Institute

Wistar scientists discovered a novel pathway that enables detection of DNA in the cytoplasm and triggers inflammation and cellular senescence. This pathway may be modulated during senescence-inducing chemotherapy to affect cancer cell response to checkpoint inhibitors.

Channels: All Journal News, Cancer, Cell Biology, Nature (journal),

Released:
19-Feb-2020 10:55 AM EST
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Released:
19-Feb-2020 10:50 AM EST
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Random gene pulsing generates patterns of life

University of Cambridge

A team of Cambridge scientists working on the intersection between biology and computation has found that random gene activity helps patterns form during development of a model multicellular system.

Channels: All Journal News, Biotech, Cell Biology, Genetics, Nature (journal),

Released:
19-Feb-2020 10:45 AM EST
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