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Released: 1-Jul-2020 12:40 PM EDT
Clinical-grade wearables offer continuous monitoring for COVID-19
Northwestern University

Stamp-sized device comprises a suite of clinical-grade sensors, including temperature and pulse oximetry

Released: 1-Jul-2020 11:25 AM EDT
Researchers Observe Branched Flow of Light for the First Time
American Technion Society

A team of researchers from the Technion - Israel Institute of Technology has observed branched flow of light for the very first time. The beautiful phenomenon allows for new and exciting research opportunities in the fields of Optics and Optofluidics.

Newswise: Researchers tracking COVID-19 in wastewater to join forces on framework for translating data into a public health response
Released: 1-Jul-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Researchers tracking COVID-19 in wastewater to join forces on framework for translating data into a public health response
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Researchers from four institutions will create a "startup blueprint" that cities can use to implement SARS-CoV-2 surveillance at their area's wastewater treatment plants. Funded by the Sloan Foundation, the action plan they develop could be used to monitor COVID-19 and other pathogens.

Newswise: Epigenetics Researcher Yang Shi Appointed Member of Ludwig Oxford
Released: 1-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Epigenetics Researcher Yang Shi Appointed Member of Ludwig Oxford
Ludwig Cancer Research

It is with great pleasure that Ludwig Cancer Research announces the appointment of Yang Shi as Member of the Oxford Branch of the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.

Newswise: The fossil detective
Released: 1-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
The fossil detective
West Virginia University - Eberly College of Arts and Sciences

Uncovering what drives the evolution of new animals is key for understanding the history of life on Earth. Geologist James Lamsdell is embarking on this exploration as a recipient of the National Science Foundation’s CAREER award.

Newswise: Nobel Prize-winning chemist M. Stanley Whittingham named to “Great Immigrants, Great Americans” list for 2020
Released: 1-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Nobel Prize-winning chemist M. Stanley Whittingham named to “Great Immigrants, Great Americans” list for 2020
Binghamton University, State University of New York

M. Stanley Whittingham, a 2019 Nobel Laureate and distinguished professor at Binghamton University, State University of New York, has been named to the Carnegie Corporation of New York’s 2020 list of “Great Immigrants, Great Americans.”

Newswise: Traffic Data Show Drastic Changes in Floridians’ Behavior at Onset of the Pandemic
Released: 1-Jul-2020 8:30 AM EDT
Traffic Data Show Drastic Changes in Floridians’ Behavior at Onset of the Pandemic
Florida Atlantic University

A study using same-day traffic volumes for March 2019 and March 2020 across Florida examined the chronological relationship of key governmental requests for public isolation and travel limitations. Results show the drastic changes in human behavior during the onset of the pandemic. Traffic volumes by March 22, 2020, dropped by 47.5 percent compared to that same point in 2019. Moreover, traffic declined in March 2020 corresponding with the governor’s state of emergency declaration and school, restaurant, and bar closures.

Newswise: Science Snapshots July 2020
Released: 1-Jul-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Science Snapshots July 2020
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Berkeley Lab Science Snapshots July 2020

Released: 1-Jul-2020 7:15 AM EDT
The mystery of pollen sterility and its reversion in pigeon pea revealed in a new study
University of Vienna

The Vienna Metabolomics Centre (VIME), University of Vienna, in collaboration with International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), based in India has made a breakthrough in pigeonpea by resolving the mystery behind fertility-sterility transition in pigeonpea.

Newswise: The Electrochemical Society and Toyota Motor 
Engineering & Manufacturing North America, Inc. 
Announce 2020-2021 Fellowship Winners for 
Projects in Green Energy Technology
Released: 1-Jul-2020 5:00 AM EDT
The Electrochemical Society and Toyota Motor Engineering & Manufacturing North America, Inc. Announce 2020-2021 Fellowship Winners for Projects in Green Energy Technology
The Electrochemical Society

Prof. Dr. Shoji Hall, Prof. Dr. Piran Ravichandran Kidambi, and Dr. Haegyeom Kim have been awarded the 2020-2021 ECS Toyota Young Investigator Fellowships. Through this, ECS and Toyota aim to promote innovative and unconventional technologies borne from electrochemical research. The fellowship encourages young professors and scholars to pursue innovative electrochemical research in green energy technology.

29-Jun-2020 9:00 AM EDT
An ethical eye on AI - new mathematical idea reins in AI bias towards making unethical and costly commercial choices
University of Warwick

Researchers from the University of Warwick, Imperial College London, EPFL (Lausanne) and Sciteb Ltd have found a mathematical means of helping regulators and business manage and police Artificial Intelligence systems’ biases towards making unethical, and potentially very costly and damaging commercial choices - an ethical eye on AI.

Newswise: UTEP Research Reveals More About Path Bacterial Pathogen Travels to Cause Tuberculosis
Released: 30-Jun-2020 4:55 PM EDT
UTEP Research Reveals More About Path Bacterial Pathogen Travels to Cause Tuberculosis
University of Texas at El Paso

Jianjun Sun, Ph.D., associate professor in UTEP’s Department of Biological Sciences, led the research on Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Sun’s lab has been investigating the mechanisms of Mtb pathogenesis for more than 10 years at UTEP with a specific focus on EsxA, which is a virulence factor essential for Mtb virulence and a preferred target for developing novel anti-TB drugs and vaccines.

Newswise: New Tech Lets Marine Scientists Track Real-Time Health of Coral Reefs Around the World
Released: 30-Jun-2020 4:55 PM EDT
New Tech Lets Marine Scientists Track Real-Time Health of Coral Reefs Around the World
Wildlife Conservation Society

MERMAID, an open-source tech platform for marine scientists, is for the first time launching an interactive map that provides an insider’s view of the ecosystem data collected from coral reefs by field scientists around the world.

Newswise: Mathematical noodling leads to new insights into an old fusion problem
Released: 30-Jun-2020 4:40 PM EDT
Mathematical noodling leads to new insights into an old fusion problem
Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Scientists at PPPL have gained new insight into a common type of plasma hiccup that interferes with fusion reactions. These findings could help bring fusion energy closer to reality.

Newswise: The Magnetic History of Ice
Released: 30-Jun-2020 3:45 PM EDT
The Magnetic History of Ice
Weizmann Institute of Science

The Weizmann Institute's Prof. Oded Aharonson found that ancient ice holds magnetic particles. The finding could shed greater light on the Earth’s magnetic field reversals, supplement magnetic field data from rocks and sediment, and identify field reversals on other bodies in our Solar System, such as Mars.

Newswise: Argonne to advance energy security and safety with funds from U.S.-Israel Energy Center
Released: 30-Jun-2020 3:40 PM EDT
Argonne to advance energy security and safety with funds from U.S.-Israel Energy Center
Argonne National Laboratory

Researchers at Argonne will share advances in offshore drilling safety and technology in the Eastern Mediterranean with a new five-year grant from the U.S.-Israel Energy Center.

Released: 30-Jun-2020 2:05 PM EDT
The Impact Factor of AACC’s Clinical Chemistry Journal Increases to 7.292
American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC)

AACC, a global scientific and medical professional organization dedicated to better health through laboratory medicine, is pleased to announce that the impact factor of its journal, Clinical Chemistry, has risen to 7.292 in the 2019 Clarivate Analytics Journal Citation Reports. This impact factor places Clinical Chemistry in the top 4.2% of 12,838 ranked academic journals and speaks to the significant influence of the science it publishes on laboratory medicine and patient care.

Newswise:Video Embedded sneaky-salmonella-finds-a-backdoor-into-plants
VIDEO
Released: 30-Jun-2020 1:10 PM EDT
Sneaky salmonella finds a backdoor into plants
University of Delaware

Researchers have discovered that bacteria such as salmonella and E.coli have a backdoor to capitalize on our reliance on leafy greens for a healthy diet. Wild strains of salmonella are delivering foodborne illnesses by circumventing a plant’s immune defense system to get into the leaves of lettuce.

Newswise: 236145_web.jpg
Released: 30-Jun-2020 12:40 PM EDT
Using cellular networks to detect at-risk areas for spread of COVID-19
Colorado State University

In the fight against COVID-19, researchers at Colorado State University have developed a new, non-invasive strategy to identify areas at greatest risk for spreading the disease.

Newswise: 236148_web.jpg
Released: 30-Jun-2020 12:30 PM EDT
Researchers look for answers as to why western bumblebees are declining
University of Wyoming

A University of Wyoming researcher and her Ph.D. student have spent the last three years studying the decline of the Western bumblebee.

Newswise: Need to Check Patient’s Jugular Venous Pressure? There’s An App For That
Released: 30-Jun-2020 11:40 AM EDT
Need to Check Patient’s Jugular Venous Pressure? There’s An App For That
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – July 1, 2020 – A new report from cardiologists at UT Southwestern raises the hope that doctors will be able to visually check the jugular venous pressure of heart failure patients remotely, using the camera on a smartphone. The finding is especially timely as telemedicine expands during the pandemic.

Newswise: Countries Group into Clusters as COVID-19 Outbreak Spreads
29-Jun-2020 1:25 PM EDT
Countries Group into Clusters as COVID-19 Outbreak Spreads
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Mathematicians based in Australia and China have developed a method to analyze the large amount of data accumulated during the COVID-19 pandemic. The technique, described in the journal Chaos, can identify anomalous countries -- those that are more successful than expected at responding to the pandemic and those that are particularly unsuccessful. The investigators analyzed the data with a variation of a statistical technique known as a cluster analysis.

Newswise:Video Embedded seeing-is-believing-effectiveness-of-facemasks2
VIDEO
29-Jun-2020 10:10 AM EDT
Seeing is Believing: Effectiveness of Facemasks
Florida Atlantic University

Using flow visualization of emulated coughs and sneezes, researchers assessed the efficacy of facemasks in obstructing droplets. Loosely folded facemasks and bandana-style coverings provide minimal stopping-capability for the smallest aerosolized respiratory droplets. Well-fitted homemade masks with multiple layers of quilting fabric, and off-the-shelf cone style masks, proved to be the most effective in reducing droplet dispersal. Importantly, uncovered coughs were able to travel noticeably farther than the currently recommended 6-foot distancing guideline. Without a mask, droplets traveled more than 8 feet.

Newswise: Respiratory Droplet Motion, Evaporation and Spread of COVID-19-Type Pandemics
26-Jun-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Respiratory Droplet Motion, Evaporation and Spread of COVID-19-Type Pandemics
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

It is well established the COVID-19 virus is transmitted via respiratory droplets. Consequently, much research targets better understanding droplet motion and evaporation. In Physics of Fluids, researchers developed a mathematical model for the early phases of a COVID-19-like pandemic using the aerodynamics and evaporation characteristics of respiratory droplets. The researchers modeled the pandemic dynamics with a reaction mechanism and then compared the droplet cloud ejected by an infected person versus one by a healthy person.

Newswise: Spider Silk Can Create Lenses Useful for Biological Imaging
25-Jun-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Spider Silk Can Create Lenses Useful for Biological Imaging
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Spider silk is useful for a variety of biomedical applications: It exhibits mechanical properties superior to synthetic fibers for tissue engineering, and it is not toxic or harmful to living cells. One unexpected application for spider silk is its use in the creation of biocompatible lenses for biological imaging applications. Researchers describe the feasibility of creating lenses capitalizing on the properties of natural spider silk material in the Journal of Applied Physics.

Newswise: Face Mask Construction, Materials Matter for Containing Coughing, Sneezing Droplets
24-Jun-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Face Mask Construction, Materials Matter for Containing Coughing, Sneezing Droplets
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

While the use of face masks in public has been widely recommended by health officials during the current COVID-19 pandemic, there are relatively few specific guidelines pertaining to mask materials and designs. A study in Physics of Fluids looks to better understand which types are best for controlling respiratory droplets that could contain viruses. The team experimented with different choices in material and design to determine how well face masks block droplets as they exit the mouth.

Released: 30-Jun-2020 10:30 AM EDT
Using your phone’s microphone to track possible COVID-19 exposure
Ohio State University

Signals sent and received from cell phone microphones and speakers could help warn people when they have been near someone who has contracted COVID-19, researchers say. In a new paper, researchers described a system that would generate random, anonymous IDs for each phone, automatically send ultrasonic signals between microphones and speakers of phones within a certain radius, and use the information exchanged through this acoustic channel for contact tracing.

Released: 30-Jun-2020 9:50 AM EDT
Electrochemical reaction powers new drug discoveries
Cornell University

A Cornell-led collaboration is flipping the switch on traditional synthetic chemistry by using electricity to drive a new chemical reaction that previously stumped chemists who rely on conventional methods.

Released: 30-Jun-2020 9:35 AM EDT
NSF Grant Supports Search for Plastic Polymer That Can Be Broken Down and Reused
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

With the support of a grant from the National Science Foundation, chemical engineers from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute aim to develop a new polymer that can replace polystyrene, a commonly used plastic that is inexpensive and easy to make — but is difficult to break down into its original components for reuse, a process called depolymerization.

Newswise: Researchers Identify Multiple Molecules that Shut Down SARS-Cov-2 Polymerase Reaction
Released: 30-Jun-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Researchers Identify Multiple Molecules that Shut Down SARS-Cov-2 Polymerase Reaction
Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

Researchers at Columbia Engineering and the University of Wisconsin-Madison have identified a library of molecules that shut down the SARS-CoV-2 polymerase reaction, a key step that establishes the potential of these molecules as lead compounds to be further modified for the development of COVID-19 therapeutics. Five of these molecules are already FDA-approved for use in the treatment of other viral infections including HIV/AIDS, cytomegalovirus, and hepatitis B.

Released: 30-Jun-2020 8:05 AM EDT
MIPT geneticist Pavel Volchkov shares his thoughts on using genetic mechanisms to oppose diseases, and talks about his vision of science communication
Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT)

Progress can be safely considered synonymous with science. We have seen a tangible improvement over the last hundred years. But who are the people behind such a mysterious sphere as science? What is its future focus? And why are academic partnerships so important now? Explains MIPT geneticist Pavel Volchkov

Released: 30-Jun-2020 7:55 AM EDT
Rutgers Pediatricians Co-Author First Nationwide Study of COVID-19 Related Multiple Inflammatory Syndrome in Children
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Rutgers pediatricians co-lead first nationwide study describing the diagnosis, treatments and outcomes of COVID-19 related multiple inflammatory syndrome in children

Released: 29-Jun-2020 5:05 PM EDT
Atmospheric processes likely caused puzzling haze over China during COVID-19 shutdown
Wiley

New research indicates that significant enhancement of secondary aerosol formed in the atmosphere via gas-to-particle conversion, together with long-lasting regional transport, may be the cause of severe haze over China despite a dramatic reduction in emissions during the COVID-19 shutdown.

Newswise: 235939_web.jpg
Released: 29-Jun-2020 5:05 PM EDT
First measurement of spin-orbit alignment on planet Beta Pictoris b
University of Exeter

Astronomers have made the first measurement of spin-orbit alignment for a distant 'super-Jupiter' planet, demonstrating a technique that could enable breakthroughs in the quest to understand how exoplanetary systems form and evolved.

Newswise: Ancient Maya Reservoirs Contained Toxic Pollution
Released: 29-Jun-2020 4:50 PM EDT
Ancient Maya Reservoirs Contained Toxic Pollution
University of Cincinnati

Mercury, algae made water undrinkable in heart of city

Released: 29-Jun-2020 4:30 PM EDT
Global warming will cause ecosystems to produce more methane than first predicted
Queen Mary University of London

New research suggests that as the Earth warms natural ecosystems such as freshwaters will release more methane than expected from predictions based on temperature increases alone.

Released: 29-Jun-2020 4:25 PM EDT
S&T and NSA Test Automated Security Vetting for Mobile Apps
Homeland Security's Science And Technology Directorate

Under a joint pilot program, DHS S&T and NIAP within the National Security Agency (NSA) cybersecurity mission have demonstrated that the process can be automated.

Newswise: Researchers catch a wave to determine how forces control granular material properties
Released: 29-Jun-2020 3:15 PM EDT
Researchers catch a wave to determine how forces control granular material properties
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Stress wave propagation through granular material is important for detecting the magnitude of earthquakes, locating oil and gas reservoirs, designing acoustic insulation and designing materials for compacting powders. A team of researchers including Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) physicist Eric Herbold used X-ray measurements and analyses to show that velocity scaling and dispersion in wave transmission is based on grainy particle arrangements and chains of force between them, while reduction of wave intensity is caused mainly from grainy particle arrangements alone.

Released: 29-Jun-2020 1:55 PM EDT
Infant heart-assist device gets new life with $4.7M grant
Cornell University

After being defunded by a company with rights to its intellectual property, development of a pediatric heart-assist device has been revived at Cornell with the help of a $4.7 million grant from the U.S. Department of Defense.

Newswise: UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) Could Serve as “Smokescreen” for Further Environmental Destruction
Released: 29-Jun-2020 1:50 PM EDT
UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) Could Serve as “Smokescreen” for Further Environmental Destruction
Wildlife Conservation Society

A team of scientists warn that the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which were designed to reconcile environmental protection with socioeconomic development, are failing to protect biodiversity at their current of implementation.

Released: 29-Jun-2020 1:40 PM EDT
How volcanoes explode in the deep sea
University of Würzburg

Most volcanic eruptions take place unseen at the bottom of the world's oceans. In recent years, oceanography has shown that this submarine volcanism not only deposits lava but also ejects large amounts of volcanic ash.

Newswise: giphy.gif
Released: 29-Jun-2020 1:10 PM EDT
Artificial intelligence identifies, locates seizures in real-time
Washington University in St. Louis

Research from the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis has shown that understanding brain activity as a network instead of readings from an EEG allow for more accurate and efficient detection of seizures in real-time.

Newswise: Computing collaboration reveals global ripple effect of shifting monsoons
Released: 29-Jun-2020 1:05 PM EDT
Computing collaboration reveals global ripple effect of shifting monsoons
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Scientists from ORNL and a dozen other international research institutions ran a series of simulations to produce the most elaborate set of projections to date that illustrates possible changes in nine monsoon regions across five continents.

Newswise: Sandia weapons program meets safety, design requirements
Released: 29-Jun-2020 12:10 PM EDT
Sandia weapons program meets safety, design requirements
Sandia National Laboratories

Sandia National Laboratories has successfully completed another milestone in the B61-12 gravity bomb refurbishment program, demonstrating the labs is meeting important nuclear safety and use-control requirements.

Newswise: Wearable Health
Released: 29-Jun-2020 11:55 AM EDT
Wearable Health
Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology

There is more than cool looks about hip clothing for top performance: Thanks to a variety of smart technologies, high-tech clothing today is capable of analyzing body functions or actively optimizing the microclimate. The basis of these novel textiles are “smart” fibers and biocompatible composites that also contribute to innovations in biomedical research such as sensors, drug delivery systems or tissue engineering.


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