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Released: 22-Sep-2020 11:35 AM EDT
DOE Funding Boosts Artificial Intelligence Research at Jefferson Lab
Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

Two physicists at DOE's Jefferson Lab have secured $2.16 million in funding for projects that harness the power of data analytics to make the work of studying the universe down to its smallest subatomic parts faster and more efficient.

Newswise: Inducing Plasma in Biomass Could Make Biogas Easier to Produce
18-Sep-2020 10:55 AM EDT
Inducing Plasma in Biomass Could Make Biogas Easier to Produce
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Producing biogas from the bacterial breakdown of biomass presents options for a greener energy future, but the complex composition of biomass comes with challenges. Cellulose and woody lignocellulose are especially hard for bacteria to digest but pretreatment can make it easier. Researchers are testing plasma formation in biomass and finding a promising method: A plasma-liquid interaction forms reactive species that help break down the biomass and decrease the viscosity of the biomass material.

Newswise: COVID-19: Second Wave for Some; Others Remain in First Wave
17-Sep-2020 3:20 PM EDT
COVID-19: Second Wave for Some; Others Remain in First Wave
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, some locations have experienced decreasing numbers of cases followed by an increase. In the journal Chaos, mathematicians report a method to analyze these numbers for evidence of a first or second wave. The authors studied data from all 50 U.S. states plus D.C. for the seven-month period from Jan. 21 to July 31. They found 31 states and D.C. were experiencing a second wave as of the end of July.

Newswise: Evaporation Critical to Coronavirus Transmission as Weather Changes
16-Sep-2020 10:10 AM EDT
Evaporation Critical to Coronavirus Transmission as Weather Changes
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

As COVID-19 cases continue to rise, it is increasingly urgent to understand how climate impacts the spread of the coronavirus, particularly as winter virus infections are more common and the northern hemisphere will soon see cooler temperatures. In Physics of Fluids, researchers studied the effects of relative humidity, environmental temperature, and wind speed on the respiratory cloud and virus viability. They found a critical factor for the transmission of the infectious particles is evaporation.

Newswise: Power Player: Engineering professor researches how to keep America’s lights on
Released: 22-Sep-2020 10:25 AM EDT
Power Player: Engineering professor researches how to keep America’s lights on
Binghamton University, State University of New York

Ning Zhou from Binghamton University, State University of New York received a National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER Award to provide a 21st-century vision for power systems.

Newswise: NRAO Joins Space Mission to the Far Side of the Moon to Explore the Early Universe
Released: 22-Sep-2020 10:00 AM EDT
NRAO Joins Space Mission to the Far Side of the Moon to Explore the Early Universe
National Radio Astronomy Observatory

The NRAO has joined a new NASA space mission to the far side of the Moon to investigate when the first stars began to form in the early universe.

Released: 22-Sep-2020 10:00 AM EDT
COVID-19 Pandemic Highlights Urgent Need To Re-Examine Hazard Mitigation
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

With many people stuck inside for months on end, the built environment has played a significant role in the COVID-19 pandemic. With support from a new National Science Foundation grant, a team of engineers and social scientists will study the ways in which that built environment mitigates or exacerbates the pandemic.

Released: 22-Sep-2020 9:30 AM EDT
2020 Blavatnik Regional Awards for Young Scientists Honorees Announced during National Postdoc Appreciation Week
New York Academy of Sciences

The winning postdoctoral researchers include a neuroscientist improving memory formation and recall, an astrophysicist illuminating dark matter, and a biochemist refining gene-editing technologies

Newswise: Big Astronomy planetarium show premieres September 26
Released: 22-Sep-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Big Astronomy planetarium show premieres September 26
Associated Universities, Inc.

The Big Astronomy worldwide premiere is coming soon to a smart phone or connected device near you! On September 26 at noon Pacific Time (PT), the new planetarium show Big Astronomy: People, Places, Discoveries will be released for an immersive 360° viewing experience, viewable on either the California Academy of Sciences YouTube channel or the Big Astronomy YouTube channel. Audiences can also tune in to the Big Astronomy YouTube channel for additional screenings at 5pm and 7pm PT as well as one in Spanish at 2pm PT.

Released: 22-Sep-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Cities beat suburbs at inspiring cutting-edge innovations
Ohio State University

The disruptive inventions that make people go “Wow!” tend to come from research in the heart of cities and not in the suburbs, a new study suggests.

Newswise: Phil Tubesing awarded Los Alamos National Laboratory’s  2020 Global Security Medal
Released: 21-Sep-2020 7:45 PM EDT
Phil Tubesing awarded Los Alamos National Laboratory’s 2020 Global Security Medal
Los Alamos National Laboratory

Philip K. “Phil” Tubesing is the 2020 awardee of Los Alamos National Laboratory’s prestigious Global Security Medal, which recognizes the exceptional achievements of active or recently retired employees who have made significant contributions to the Laboratory’s global security mission.

Newswise: $2M USDA grant funds value-added grains project
Released: 21-Sep-2020 5:05 PM EDT
$2M USDA grant funds value-added grains project
Cornell University

A Cornell University scientist is leading a multi-institution team that’s helping turn diverse and ancient grains into staple foods throughout the Northeast and Midwest, thanks to a three-year, $2 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).

Newswise: CodingCamp1_WEB.jpg
Released: 21-Sep-2020 4:50 PM EDT
Personal interactions are important drivers of STEM identity in girls
Florida State University

Researchers from the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory and Florida State University found that nuanced interactions between teachers and campers at a coding camp for middle school girls as well as among the girls themselves impacted how girls viewed themselves as coders.

Newswise: E. coli bacteria offer path to improving photosynthesis
Released: 21-Sep-2020 3:55 PM EDT
E. coli bacteria offer path to improving photosynthesis
Cornell University

Cornell University scientists have engineered a key plant enzyme and introduced it in Escherichia coli bacteria in order to create an optimal experimental environment for studying how to speed up photosynthesis, a holy grail for improving crop yields.

Newswise: New national imaging center has potential to transform medicine
Released: 21-Sep-2020 3:50 PM EDT
New national imaging center has potential to transform medicine
Morgridge Institute for Research

A national research initiative announced today will place the University of Wisconsin-Madison at the forefront of a revolution in imaging fostered by cryo-electron microscopy and cryo-electron tomography - technologies that can illuminate life at the atomic scale.

Released: 21-Sep-2020 3:40 PM EDT
Securing Our Future Now: DHS S&T Offers “Responding to Disasters During a Crisis” Webinar
Homeland Security's Science And Technology Directorate

DHS S&T is convening a diverse group of public-private partners to present, Clearing the Path: Responding to Disasters During a Crisis, a virtual discussion for National Preparedness Month.

Released: 21-Sep-2020 3:05 PM EDT
Researchers identify new type of superconductor
Cornell University

Until now, the history of superconducting materials has been a tale of two types: s-wave and d-wave. Now, Cornell researchers – led by Brad Ramshaw, the Dick & Dale Reis Johnson Assistant Professor in the College of Arts and Sciences – have discovered a possible third type: g-wave.

Newswise: Artificial Intelligence Detects Osteoarthritis Years Before it Develops
21-Sep-2020 10:30 AM EDT
Artificial Intelligence Detects Osteoarthritis Years Before it Develops
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Researchers have created a machine-learning algorithm that can pick up on subtle signs of osteoarthritis – too abstract to register in the eye of a trained radiologist – on an MRI scan taken years before symptom onset.

Newswise: Graziano Venanzoni elected new co-spokesperson of Muon g-2 collaboration
Released: 21-Sep-2020 2:55 PM EDT
Graziano Venanzoni elected new co-spokesperson of Muon g-2 collaboration
Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab)

A physicist at the Italian National Institute for Nuclear Physics, Venanzoni will help prepare the Muon g-2 collaboration for its highly anticipated first scientific publication and work with partners to ensure a long life for the experiment, where scientists are searching for new particles emerging from the quantum foam that surrounds all matter.

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Released: 21-Sep-2020 2:25 PM EDT
Male baboons with female friends live longer
Duke University

Close bonds with the opposite sex can have non-romantic benefits. And not just for people, but for our primate cousins, too.

Released: 21-Sep-2020 2:05 PM EDT
Engineers link brains to computers using 3D printed implants
University of Sheffield

University of Sheffield engineers have developed 3D printed implants that can be used to link brains to computers

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Released: 21-Sep-2020 1:35 PM EDT
Why there is no speed limit in the superfluid universe
Lancaster University

Physicists from Lancaster University have established why objects moving through superfluid helium-3 lack a speed limit in a continuation of earlier Lancaster research.

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Released: 21-Sep-2020 1:10 PM EDT
Archaeology uncovers infectious disease spread - 4000 years ago
University of Otago

New bioarchaeology research from a University of Otago PhD candidate has shown how infectious diseases may have spread 4000 years ago, while highlighting the dangers of letting such diseases run rife.

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Released: 21-Sep-2020 12:50 PM EDT
New research highlights impact of COVID-19 on food security in Kenya and Uganda
CABI Publishing

CABI scientists have conducted new research highlighting the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on food security in Kenya and Uganda with more than two-thirds of those surveyed having experienced economic hardship due to the pandemic.

Newswise: Astrophysics students lead upgrades to Green Bank Telescope
Released: 21-Sep-2020 12:35 PM EDT
Astrophysics students lead upgrades to Green Bank Telescope
West Virginia University - Eberly College of Arts and Sciences

A team of WVU astrophysics students helped create a new radio camera for the Green Bank Telescope, the first of its kind in the U.S.

Released: 21-Sep-2020 12:30 PM EDT
Claims that "Antifa" or far-left activists have been arrested for setting fires in Oregon, a state hit by devastating wildfires, are false
Newswise

Widely shared posts on social media claim members of Antifa, the unstructured far-left movement, have been arrested for setting wildfires in Oregon. This misinformation was even spread by the popular Spotify podcaster Joe Rogan (who has since apologized). These claims are false. law enforcement officers from areas where the arrests were allegedly made have denied they took place, and said calls about the claims are hampering operations.

Newswise: New composite material revs up pursuit of advanced electric vehicles
Released: 21-Sep-2020 12:25 PM EDT
New composite material revs up pursuit of advanced electric vehicles
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory used new techniques to create a composite that increases the electrical current capacity of copper wires, providing a new material that can be scaled for use in ultra-efficient, power-dense electric vehicle traction motors.

Released: 21-Sep-2020 12:10 PM EDT
Funding climate action policies: Consumers weigh-in
Washington University in St. Louis

There is a growing demand for countries to take aggressive action to combat climate change, but less consensus on how to fund it. In a new study published in Nature Climate Change, researchers asked more than 10,000 people from the U.S., U.K., Germany and France to weigh in.

Newswise: Improving bison health, production
Released: 21-Sep-2020 11:40 AM EDT
Improving bison health, production
South Dakota State University

The Center of Excellence for Bison Studies seeks to improve bison herd health and production and the economic viability of both private and tribal bison producers.

Released: 21-Sep-2020 11:25 AM EDT
Advancing the accurate tracking of energy poverty
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

A novel measurement framework that better aligns with the services people lack rather than capturing the mere absence of physical connections to a source of electricity can help track energy poverty.

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Released: 21-Sep-2020 11:10 AM EDT
A computer predicts your thoughts, creating images based on them
University of Helsinki

Researchers at the University of Helsinki have developed a technique in which a computer models visual perception by monitoring human brain signals.

Newswise: Argonne National Laboratory and AT&T extend climate resiliency project nationwide
Released: 21-Sep-2020 10:50 AM EDT
Argonne National Laboratory and AT&T extend climate resiliency project nationwide
Argonne National Laboratory

Argonne and AT&T have been working together to project risks from changing climate on America’s Southeastern region. Today they’ve announced that they’re extending their analysis to cover the entire contiguous U.S.

Released: 21-Sep-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Soft robots, origami combine for potential way to deliver medical treatments
Ohio State University

Researchers have found a way to send tiny, soft robots into humans, potentially opening the door for less invasive surgeries and ways to deliver treatments for conditions ranging from colon polyps to stomach cancer to aortic artery blockages.

Newswise: Valentine Nzengung: Making the world a safer place
Released: 21-Sep-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Valentine Nzengung: Making the world a safer place
University of Georgia

Valentine Nzengung's inventions to neutralize explosives protect humans and the environment

Newswise:Video Embedded nus-develops-smart-suit-wirelessly-powered-by-a-smartphone
VIDEO
Released: 21-Sep-2020 8:55 AM EDT
NUS team develops smart suit wirelessly powered by a smartphone
National University of Singapore

A research team from the National University of Singapore has developed a smart suit that is wirelessly powered by a smartphone for easy and accurate real-time monitoring of data such as posture, body temperature and gait.

Newswise: Computational study of a famous fossil offers insight into the evolution of locomotion in “ruling reptiles”
Released: 21-Sep-2020 8:50 AM EDT
Computational study of a famous fossil offers insight into the evolution of locomotion in “ruling reptiles”
University of Bristol

Scientists from the University of Bristol and the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) used three-dimensional computer modelling to investigate the hindlimb of Euparkeria capensis–a small reptile that lived in the Triassic Period 245 million years ago–and inferred that it had a “mosaic” of functions in locomotion.

Newswise: Studies investigate marine heatwaves, shifting ocean currents
Released: 21-Sep-2020 8:45 AM EDT
Studies investigate marine heatwaves, shifting ocean currents
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Two new studies from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) investigate marine heatwaves and currents at the edge of the continental shelf, which impact regional ocean circulation and marine life.

Newswise: How to Get a Handle on Carbon Dioxide Uptake by Plants
Released: 21-Sep-2020 6:00 AM EDT
How to Get a Handle on Carbon Dioxide Uptake by Plants
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

How much carbon dioxide, a pivotal greenhouse gas behind global warming, is absorbed by plants on land? It’s a deceptively complicated question, so a Rutgers-led group of scientists recommends combining two cutting-edge tools to help answer the crucial climate change-related question.

18-Sep-2020 5:20 PM EDT
October Issue SLAS Technology Features Cover Article, “Role of Digital Microfluidics in Enabling Access to Laboratory Automation and Making Biology Programmable”
SLAS

The October issue of SLAS Technology features the cover article, “Role of Digital Micro uidics in Enabling Access to Laboratory Automation and Making Biology Programmable” by Varun B. Kothamachu, Ph.D., Sabrina Zaini and Federico Muffatto (Digi.Bio).

18-Sep-2020 5:10 PM EDT
October Issue of SLAS Discovery Features Cover Article “A Critical and Concise Review of Mass Spectrometry Applied to Imaging in Drug Discovery”
SLAS

The October edition of SLAS Discovery features the cover article, “A Critical and Concise Review of Mass Spectrometry Applied to Imaging in Drug Discovery” by Richard J. A. Goodwin Ph.D. (AstraZeneca), Zoltan Takats Ph.D. (Imperial College London), and Josephine Bunch, Ph.D. (National Physical Laboratory).

Released: 18-Sep-2020 3:35 PM EDT
After developing CRISPR test, UConn researchers validate clinical feasibility for COVID-19 testing
University of Connecticut

In March, researchers in the Department of Biomedical Engineering-- a shared department in the schools of Dental Medicine, Medicine, and Engineering--began to develop a new, low-cost, CRISPR-based diagnostic platform to detect infectious diseases, including HIV virus, the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2).

Newswise:Video Embedded blowin-in-the-wind
VIDEO
Released: 18-Sep-2020 3:10 PM EDT
Blowin' in the wind
University of Utah

University of Utah chemical engineers have conducted an air flow study of the venue that the Utah Symphony performs in to determine the best ways to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 through the emissions of wind instrument players.

Released: 18-Sep-2020 3:10 PM EDT
Key Partners Mark Launch of Electron-Ion Collider Project
Brookhaven National Laboratory

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Undersecretary for Science Paul Dabbar, leaders from DOE’s Brookhaven National Laboratory (Brookhaven Lab) and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab), and elected officials from New York State and Virginia today commemorated the start of the Electron-Ion Collider project.

Newswise: Heavy rainfall drives a third of nitrogen runoff, according to new study
Released: 18-Sep-2020 3:00 PM EDT
Heavy rainfall drives a third of nitrogen runoff, according to new study
Iowa State University

Extreme rain events that occur on nine days a year drive around a third of all nitrogen yields on farmland in the Mississippi River basin, according to a new study. The research could inform how and when farmers apply nitrogen fertilizer to their fields and has environmental implications for the hypoxic zone in the Gulf of Mexico.

Newswise: original-1600413619.jpg?t=eyJ3aWR0aCI6ODQ4LCJvYmpfaWQiOjE4NjM3MDR9--8928a6ae58a00acf8cfa5007fb893ff03e174465
Released: 18-Sep-2020 1:55 PM EDT
Ancient human footprints in Saudi Arabia give glimpse of Arabian ecology 120000 years ago
Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History

Situated between Africa and Eurasia, the Arabian Peninsula is an important yet understudied region for understanding human evolution across the continents.

Newswise: ICEBERG tests future neutrino detector systems with 'beautiful' results
Released: 18-Sep-2020 1:20 PM EDT
ICEBERG tests future neutrino detector systems with 'beautiful' results
Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab)

Scientists are testing the components and systems for the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, hosted by Fermilab, with other liquid-argon particle detectors. One such detector is ICEBERG, which is over 10,000 times smaller than DUNE will be. ICEBERG’s measurements are providing insight for future neutrino experiments.

Newswise: Naturally Occurring Radiation Limits Superconducting Qubit Coherence Times
Released: 18-Sep-2020 1:00 PM EDT
Naturally Occurring Radiation Limits Superconducting Qubit Coherence Times
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Two new experiments have demonstrated the correlation between natural radiation levels and the duration of qubit coherence. If radiation cannot be mitigated, it will limit the coherence time of qubits to a few milliseconds.

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Released: 18-Sep-2020 12:40 PM EDT
Solar storm forecasts for Earth improved with help from the public
University of Reading

Solar storm analysis carried out by an army of citizen scientists has helped researchers devise a new and more accurate way of forecasting when Earth will be hit by harmful space weather.


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