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Released: 9-Aug-2022 3:05 PM EDT
U.S. Department of Energy Selects Los Alamos National Lab to Lead $9.25 Million Advanced Computing Partnership
Department of Energy, Office of Science

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the selection of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to lead a $9.25 million collaborative project in nuclear energy research through the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program. SciDAC brings together experts in science and energy research with those in software development, applied mathematics, and computer science to take full advantage of high-performance computing resources. This project will advance modeling the behavior and properties of structure materials under molten salt conditions.

Newswise: Detectan colisión galáctica desde Gemini Norte
Released: 9-Aug-2022 2:50 PM EDT
Detectan colisión galáctica desde Gemini Norte
NSF’s National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory

Una nueva imagen capturada por el telescopio Gemini Norte, en Hawai‘i, registra un par de galaxias espirales chocando entre sí y comenzando un proceso de fusión a 60 millones de años luz de distancia. Se trata de NGC 4568 y de NGC 4567, dos galaxias que están enlazadas por sus campos gravitatorios y que finalmente se unirán para formar una inmensa galaxia elíptica en 500 millones de años más. La imagen también revela los vestigios de una supernova que fue detectada en 2020.

Newswise:Video Embedded colliding-galaxies-dazzle-in-gemini-north-image
VIDEO
Released: 9-Aug-2022 2:25 PM EDT
Colliding Galaxies Dazzle in Gemini North Image
NSF’s National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory

An evocative new image captured by the Gemini North telescope in Hawai‘i reveals a pair of interacting spiral galaxies — NGC 4568 and NGC 4567 — as they begin to clash and merge. These galaxies are entangled by their mutual gravitational field and will eventually combine to form a single elliptical galaxy in around 500 million years. Also visible in the image is the glowing remains of a supernova that was detected in 2020.

Released: 9-Aug-2022 2:15 PM EDT
Do ‘bouncing universes’ have a beginning?
University at Buffalo

Some cosmological models propose that the universe expands and contracts in infinite cycles, but new research finds a crucial flaw in the latest version of this theory.

Newswise: Q&A: Professor Offers Prescription to Better Explain Climate and Health
Released: 9-Aug-2022 2:05 PM EDT
Q&A: Professor Offers Prescription to Better Explain Climate and Health
University of Oregon

Health professionals could better communicate the health effects of climate change by using information that promotes action rather than confusion, according to a recent article by a University of Oregon researcher.

     
Newswise: Robotic motion in curved space defies standard laws of physics
Released: 9-Aug-2022 2:05 PM EDT
Robotic motion in curved space defies standard laws of physics
Georgia Institute of Technology

When bodies exist in curved spaces, it turns out that they can in fact move without pushing against something.

Newswise: Strengthening Puerto Rico's Power Grid
Released: 9-Aug-2022 2:05 PM EDT
Strengthening Puerto Rico's Power Grid
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

EGRASS helps prepare and fortify critical structures to protect against the worst consequences of new hurricanes.

   
Released: 9-Aug-2022 2:05 PM EDT
Cameron Whitehead Wins Again, Taking Top Honors in the CyberForce Program’s Conquer the Hill – Reign Edition Competition
Argonne National Laboratory

The U.S. Department of Energy’s CyberForce Program hosts competitions such as Conquer the Hill – Reign Edition to help the energy sector develop a pipeline of skilled cyber defenders who can counteract ever-evolving cyber threats.

Newswise: Understanding the Secrets of Photosynthesis in the Shade
Released: 9-Aug-2022 2:05 PM EDT
Understanding the Secrets of Photosynthesis in the Shade
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Plants and algae use green-tinted chlorophyll to convert high-energy sunlight into food via photosynthesis. Some cyanobacteria can survive in deep shade by using infra-red and other low-energy light to photosynthesize. They accomplish this by re-equipping their photosynthetic protein complexes with different kinds of chlorophyll that absorb lower-energy light. Researchers have now determined the molecular structures of these photosynthetic systems to understand how cyanobacteria can use low-energy light.

Released: 9-Aug-2022 1:45 PM EDT
Consider yourself a foodie? Dig into these latest headlines from the Food Science channel
Newswise

Below are some of the latest articles that have been added to the Food Science channel on Newswise, a free source for journalists.

       
Newswise: New online resource can help users ‘bee’ friendly when it comes to planting for pollinators
Released: 9-Aug-2022 12:45 PM EDT
New online resource can help users ‘bee’ friendly when it comes to planting for pollinators
University of Sussex

An online database developed at the University of Sussex which documents pollinator-plant interactions, could help the public understand how to plant for pollinators and support biodiversity.

Released: 9-Aug-2022 12:20 PM EDT
Top Criminologist and University Leader Joins the National Policing Institute
National Policing Institute

The National Policing Institute (the Institute) is proud to announce and welcome Robin S. Engel, PhD as the Institute's Senior Vice President, becoming the second highest-ranking executive within the national non-profit research and policy organization dedicated to excellence in policing and community safety through science and innovation.

   
Released: 9-Aug-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Hidden danger in electric vehicle fires
Missouri University of Science and Technology

Like a fire in a wall, fires in electric vehicle (EV) batteries burn unseen. Firefighters can squelch the visible flames in an EV fire, but chemicals inside the battery continue to burn because firefighters cannot reach the source. Researchers at Missouri S&T are working with mine operators and firefighting agencies to plan for and mitigate EV fire risks.

Newswise: ALMA realiza la primera detección de gas en un disco circumplanetario
8-Aug-2022 11:05 AM EDT
ALMA realiza la primera detección de gas en un disco circumplanetario
National Radio Astronomy Observatory

La comunidad científica que utilizan el Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) -en el que el Observatorio Nacional de Radioastronomía (NRAO) de EE.UU. es socio- para estudiar la formación de planetas, ha realizado la primera detección de gas en un disco circumplanetario. La detección también sugiere la presencia de un exoplaneta muy joven.

Newswise: ALMA Makes First-Ever Detection of Gas in a Circumplanetary Disk
8-Aug-2022 9:40 AM EDT
ALMA Makes First-Ever Detection of Gas in a Circumplanetary Disk
National Radio Astronomy Observatory

Scientists using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA)— in which the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) is a partner— to study planet formation have made the first-ever detection of gas in a circumplanetary disk. What’s more, the detection also suggests the presence of a very young exoplanet.

Newswise: Body Posture Affects How Oral Drugs Absorbed by Stomach
5-Aug-2022 3:10 PM EDT
Body Posture Affects How Oral Drugs Absorbed by Stomach
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

A common method of administering drugs is orally, by swallowing a pill or capsule. But oral administration is the most complex way for the human body to absorb an active pharmaceutical ingredient, because the bioavailability of the drug in the gastrointestinal tract depends on the medication's ingredients and the stomach's dynamic physiological environment. In Physics of Fluids, researchers from employ a biomimetic in-silico simulator based on the realistic anatomy and morphology of the stomach – a "StomachSim" – to investigate and quantify the effect of body posture and stomach motility on drug bioavailability.

   
Newswise: Ultrasound Could Save Racehorses from Bucked Shins
4-Aug-2022 1:30 PM EDT
Ultrasound Could Save Racehorses from Bucked Shins
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

When racehorses enter training at about 2 years old, they can develop tiny stress fractures and new bone formations in their legs. This condition, called bucked shin, occurs in about 70% of the animals. In The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, researchers have developed a method to screen for bucked shin using ultrasound. Axial transmission, in which an ultrasound emitter and receiver are placed on the skin to induce and measure wave velocities, is frequently used to study osteoporosis in humans. The method could detect bucked shin more easily and preserve the health and growth of young horses.

Newswise:Video Embedded human-machine-interfaces-work-underwater-generate-their-own-power
VIDEO
4-Aug-2022 9:50 AM EDT
Human-Machine Interfaces Work Underwater, Generate Their Own Power
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

In Applied Physics Reviews, scientists at UCLA describe their development of a type of wearable human-machine interface device that is stretchable, inexpensive, and waterproof. The device is based on a soft magnetoelastic sensor array that converts mechanical pressure from the press of a finger into an electrical signal. The device involves two main components: a layer that translates mechanical movement to a magnetic response and a magnetic induction layer consisting of patterned liquid metal coils.

Newswise: Understanding How Rechargeable Aqueous Zinc Batteries Work
Released: 9-Aug-2022 10:30 AM EDT
Understanding How Rechargeable Aqueous Zinc Batteries Work
University of Illinois Chicago

“With this study, we showed there is actually no microscopic evidence of zinc reinsertion into manganese dioxide, and what was previously thought to be indicators of recharging was from positively charged hydrogen ions being inserted in the manganese, not zinc.”

Newswise: Barbara Mikulski Donates Space Collection to Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore
Released: 9-Aug-2022 10:05 AM EDT
Barbara Mikulski Donates Space Collection to Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore
Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI)

The Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) in Baltimore, Maryland, is thrilled to announce that retired U.S. Senator Barbara A. Mikulski is donating her space memorabilia collection to STScI. The collection includes framed astronomical images, photos, illustrations, and models.

Newswise: “We’ve Got the Power”: Sandia technology test delivers electricity to the grid
Released: 9-Aug-2022 9:55 AM EDT
“We’ve Got the Power”: Sandia technology test delivers electricity to the grid
Sandia National Laboratories

For the first time, Sandia National Laboratories researchers delivered electricity produced by a new power-generating system to the Sandia-Kirtland Air Force Base electrical grid.

Newswise: CUVET Answers All Your Questions Related to “Rabies” while Campaigning for Vaccination in High-Risk Groups to Prevent Fatal Communicable Disease
Released: 9-Aug-2022 8:55 AM EDT
CUVET Answers All Your Questions Related to “Rabies” while Campaigning for Vaccination in High-Risk Groups to Prevent Fatal Communicable Disease
Chulalongkorn University

Chula Veterinary Science joined the World Rabies Day campaign on September 28, to educate and raise awareness about rabies, and organize vaccinations for veterinarian science students who volunteered in the community, while emphasizing that people at risk should be vaccinated regularly against rabies.

   
Newswise:Video Embedded water-quality-woes-in-southwest-florida-linked-to-seeping-septic-systems
VIDEO
Released: 9-Aug-2022 8:30 AM EDT
Water Quality Woes in Southwest Florida Linked to Seeping Septic Systems
Florida Atlantic University

From fecal bacteria to blue-green algae to red tides, Southwest Florida’s water quality has declined as its population has increased. Multiple lines of evidence from a multi-year microbial source tracking study points to septic systems as a contributing source for this decline. The study is one of few to connect downstream harmful algal blooms with nutrient loading from upstream septic systems. These water quality issues are caused by aging septic systems installed in high densities in areas with shallow water tables. Septic systems may actually be sitting in groundwater during certain times of the year, which means that they cannot function properly.

Newswise: Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution names Paul Salem as new Board of Trustees Chair
Released: 9-Aug-2022 8:05 AM EDT
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution names Paul Salem as new Board of Trustees Chair
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Paul Salem, a leader in private equity and non-profit board service, has been named Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution’s new Chair of the Board of Trustees. Salem will transition into the role officially on January 1, 2023, taking over for David Scully, who has served as the Board Chair for the past seven years.

Newswise: UNH Awarded $2.8 Million to Develop Robots to Care for People with Alzheimer’s and Dementia
Released: 9-Aug-2022 8:05 AM EDT
UNH Awarded $2.8 Million to Develop Robots to Care for People with Alzheimer’s and Dementia
University of New Hampshire

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire will receive a five-year grant totaling $2.8 million from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to develop and test social assistive robots to aid in the care of individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia in the comfort of their own homes.

   
Released: 9-Aug-2022 7:05 AM EDT
Wind has caused 479 injuries, 28 deaths in bounce houses since 2000
University of Georgia

It’s all fun and games until someone gets hurt … or dies. And a lack of regulations and oversight surrounding a popular, easily rentable party feature could be putting tens of thousands of children at risk, according to new research from the University of Georgia. The study found at least 479 people were injured and 28 died worldwide in more than 130 bounce house accidents due to weather events since 2000. But the researchers caution that these estimates are likely an undercount.

   
Newswise: In Control of Chaos
Released: 9-Aug-2022 3:05 AM EDT
In Control of Chaos
Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology

Crystals consisting of wildly mixed ingredients - so-called high-entropy materials - are currently attracting growing scientific interest. Their advantage is that they are particularly stable at extremely high temperatures and could be used, for example, for energy storage and chemical production processes. An Empa team is producing and researching these mysterious ceramic materials, which have only been known since 2015.

Newswise: Robot Helps Reveal How Ants Pass on Knowledge
8-Aug-2022 4:05 AM EDT
Robot Helps Reveal How Ants Pass on Knowledge
University of Bristol

Scientists have developed a small robot to understand how ants teach one another.

Newswise: The Human Side of AI: Predicting Spine Surgery Outcomes
Released: 8-Aug-2022 7:05 PM EDT
The Human Side of AI: Predicting Spine Surgery Outcomes
Cedars-Sinai

Ever since Corey Walker, MD, became a spine surgeon, the traditional measure of success focused on how well a patient was able to walk, bend or move after spine surgery. Now, with the help of artificial intelligence, Walker is measuring success differently.

   
8-Aug-2022 3:05 PM EDT
In your head: How brain-monitoring tech advances could change the law
University of Sydney

An ankle-bracelet for criminal offenders, what about a brain-bracelet? A world-first report from University of Sydney Law School scrutinises advances in neurotechnology and what it might mean for the law and the legal profession. The paper calls for urgent consideration of how the new technology is to be regulated. It also asks how neurotechnology may affect the legal profession.

   
Released: 8-Aug-2022 5:40 PM EDT
Dry lightning sparks some of the most destructive and costly wildfires in California, study finds
Institute of Physics (IOP) Publishing

A new study has found dry lightning outbreaks are the leading cause of some of the largest wildfire outbreaks in modern California history. Despite this, dry lightning has remained largely understudied across this region – until now.

Released: 8-Aug-2022 5:20 PM EDT
Can scratches on car surfaces disappear when exposed to sunlight? : A new self-healing coating material
National Research Council of Science & Technology

A transparent protective coating material that can be self-healed in 30 minutes when exposed to sunlight has been developed.

Released: 8-Aug-2022 5:10 PM EDT
Ancient source of oxygen for life hidden deep in the Earth’s crust
Newcastle University

Scientists at Newcastle University have uncovered a source of oxygen that may have influenced the evolution of life before the advent of photosynthesis.

Released: 8-Aug-2022 5:05 PM EDT
Simulations provide map to treasure trove of fluorinated compounds
Hokkaido University

Computer simulations are most often used as a guide, so chemists can more efficiently work out the exact details of a general reaction idea they have in mind — much like a compass helps guide an explorer efficiently to a destination on their map.

Released: 8-Aug-2022 5:05 PM EDT
Energizing Africa
University of California, Santa Barbara

The economy of Southern Africa is rapidly developing, driving a growing demand for electricity.

Released: 8-Aug-2022 5:05 PM EDT
What part of a space rock survives to the ground?
SETI Institute

When a small asteroid enters Earth's atmosphere from space, its surface is brutally heated, causing melting and fragmenting.

Released: 8-Aug-2022 5:05 PM EDT
Is brain fog limited to humans?
Hamilton College

Is brain fog a condition limited to humans? “Infectious disease and cognition in wild populations,” a recently published paper in Trends in Ecology & Evolution, answers that question.

Released: 8-Aug-2022 4:30 PM EDT
Coarse sea spray keeps lightning strikes away
Hebrew University of Jerusalem

As the world grapples with the cataclysmic events associated with climate change, it is increasingly important to have accurate climate models that can help predict what might lie ahead.

Released: 8-Aug-2022 4:15 PM EDT
Rotting fish help solve mystery of how soft tissue fossils form
University of Leicester

New research at the University of Leicester has transformed scientists’ understanding of how spectacular fossils with delicate soft tissues form.

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Released: 8-Aug-2022 3:15 PM EDT
Department of Energy Announces $8.3 Million for Research on High Energy Density Plasmas
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Today, the Department of Energy’s Office of Science (SC) and DOE’s National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) announced $8.3 million for 20 research projects in High-Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas (HEDLP).

Released: 8-Aug-2022 2:15 PM EDT
Commercial satellite race raises calls for more regulations
Flinders University

Rapidly evolving technology and space debris reported in several places around the world – including pieces of a Chinese Long March 5B Rocket in the Indian Ocean – signal the need for a new era for regulation of space, Flinders University experts say.

Released: 8-Aug-2022 1:55 PM EDT
DOE Announces $19 Million to Small Businesses for Climate, Energy, and Scientific R&D
Department of Energy, Office of Science

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced a plan to provide $19 million for small businesses pursuing climate and energy research and development (R&D) projects as well the development of advanced scientific instrumentation through a funding opportunity announcement. The projects range from atmospheric science and critical materials to advanced computing and accelerator technologies.

Newswise: Study shows why ‘aromatic’ blueberries taste better
Released: 8-Aug-2022 1:05 PM EDT
Study shows why ‘aromatic’ blueberries taste better
University of Florida

So-called "aromatic" blueberries taste better. With new research, University of Florida scientists now know why, and their findings will help future plant breeding efforts.

Released: 8-Aug-2022 1:00 PM EDT
New wind sensor uses smart materials to improve drone performance
Ohio State University

Engineers have designed and successfully tested a more efficient wind sensor for use on drones, balloons and other autonomous aircraft.These wind sensors – called anemometers – are used to monitor wind speed and direction. As demand for autonomous aircraft increases, better wind sensors are needed to make it easier for these vehicles to both sense weather changes and perform safer take-offs and landings, according to researchers.

Newswise: Rapid warming in the Gulf of Maine reverses 900 years of cooling
Released: 8-Aug-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Rapid warming in the Gulf of Maine reverses 900 years of cooling
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Rapid 20th century warming in the Gulf of Maine has reversed long-term cooling that occurred there during the previous 900 years, according to new research that combines an examination of shells from long-lived ocean quahogs and climate model simulations.

Newswise: Jaime Marian: Then and Now / 2012 Early Career Award Winner
Released: 8-Aug-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Jaime Marian: Then and Now / 2012 Early Career Award Winner
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Jaime Marian is a professor at UCLA in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, studying irradiation to develop materials and improve fusion reactor designs.

Newswise:Video Embedded stars-shed-light-on-why-stellar-populations-are-so-similar-in-milky-way
VIDEO
5-Aug-2022 10:15 AM EDT
Stars Shed Light on Why Stellar Populations Are So Similar in Milky Way
Oden Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences

Using highly detailed simulations, a collaborative team led by researchers from the University of Texas at Austin has made a breakthrough discovery that star formation is a self-regulatory process, knowledge that may allow researchers to understand star formation within our own and far away galaxies.

4-Aug-2022 6:05 PM EDT
UCLA researchers use artificial intelligence tools to speed critical information on drug overdose deaths
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

Fast data processing of overdose deaths, which have increased in recent years, is crucial to developing a rapid public health response. But the system now in place lacks precision and takes months. To correct that, UCLA researchers have developed an automated process that reduces data collection to a few weeks.

   
Newswise: Journal of Mathematical Physics Announces 2021 Young Researcher Award
Released: 8-Aug-2022 10:05 AM EDT
Journal of Mathematical Physics Announces 2021 Young Researcher Award
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

The Journal of Mathematical Physics has recognized Sam Collingbourne as the winner of its 2021 Young Researcher Award. His work on the stability properties of space-times in high dimensions culminated in the winning publication, "The Gregory-Laflamme instability of the Schwarzschild black string exterior." The judges selected Collingbourne from a pool of JMP authors and the prize includes $3,000. Collingbourne explores solutions to the Einstein equation, which relates the curvature and geometry of space-time to the matter content in space-time.


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