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Article ID: 700826

Morehouse School of Medicine Awarded $200,000 to Train Minority Physicians for Recruiting Minorities in Clinical Trials

Clinical Research Pathways

Under the three-year program, minority physicians will be recruited to conduct clinical trials—research studies that prospectively assign human participants or groups of humans to one or more health-related interventions to evaluate the effects on health outcomes. The goal is to encourage more minority patients to participate in clinical trials by taking trials directly to minority patient populations.

Released:
20-Sep-2018 12:00 PM EDT
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Embargo will expire:
24-Sep-2018 9:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
20-Sep-2018 11:15 AM EDT

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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 700834

Moving Homegrown Ideas into the Clinic

University of Kansas Cancer Center

Physician-scientists at The University of Kansas Cancer center are designing and initiating their own clinical trials.

Released:
20-Sep-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Released:
20-Sep-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 700831

UNC School of Medicine Study Shows Surprise Low-level Ozone Impact on Asthma Patients

University of North Carolina Health Care System

A new study led by UNC School of Medicine researchers indicates that ozone has a greater impact on asthma patients than previously thought.

Released:
20-Sep-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    20-Sep-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 700712

What Can Salad Dressing Tell Us About Cancer? Think Oil and Vinegar

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital scientists have identified another way the process that causes oil to form droplets in water may contribute to solid tumors, such as prostate and breast cancer. The findings appear today in the journal Molecular Cell. Researchers found evidence that mutations in the tumor suppressor gene SPOP contribute to cancer by disrupting a process called liquid-liquid phase separation. Liquid-liquid phase separation is seen often in nature and is the reason why oil and vinegar separate in salad dressing.

Released:
18-Sep-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    20-Sep-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 700693

Octopuses Given Mood Drug ‘Ecstasy’ Reveal Genetic Link to Evolution of Social Behaviors in Humans

Johns Hopkins Medicine

By studying the genome of a kind of octopus not known for its friendliness toward its peers, then testing its behavioral reaction to a popular mood-altering drug called MDMA or “ecstasy,” scientists say they have found preliminary evidence of an evolutionary link between the social behaviors of the sea creature and humans, species separated by 500 million years on the evolutionary tree.

Released:
18-Sep-2018 10:00 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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  • Embargo expired:
    20-Sep-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 700567

Novel Biomarker Found in Ovarian Cancer Patients Can Predict Response to Therapy

University of Chicago Medical Center

Researchers have identified an independent prognostic factor, cancer/testis antigen 45, that is associated with extended disease-free survival for women with advanced ovarian cancer. Patients with high levels of CT45 in their tumors lived more than seven times as long as patients who lacked sufficient CT45.

Released:
14-Sep-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    20-Sep-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 700558

Scientists Grow Human Esophagus in Lab

Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Scientists working to bioengineer the entire human gastrointestinal system in a laboratory now report using pluripotent stem cells to grow human esophageal organoids. The newly published research in the journal Cell Stem Cell is the first time scientists have been able to grow human esophageal tissue entirely from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), which can form any tissue type in the body.

Released:
17-Sep-2018 6:00 AM EDT
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