Press "esc" to clear
Go to Advanced Search

Showing results

110 of 204752
10-16-2018RachelTipSheetmanbachiBMESimage.jpg

Article ID: 702280

Johns Hopkins Faculty and Student Researchers Present at 2018 Biomedical Engineering Society Meeting

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins students will be presenting posters of their engineering projects designed to fill needs in clinical care

Released:
16-Oct-2018 12:00 PM EDT
Open in New Tab
Comment
Vascular_101218.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    16-Oct-2018 11:30 AM EDT

Article ID: 702178

Improving Tools for Modeling the Interaction of Fluids and Solids

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have received an award of nearly $385,000 from the National Science Foundation (NSF) for their project to develop new and improved simulation tools for modeling physical problems relating to the interaction of fluids and solids, called fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems.

Released:
15-Oct-2018 11:30 AM EDT
Open in New Tab
Comment

Education

Article ID: 702281

Prostate cancer patients target of new $1.6M Tulane study

Tulane University

A Tulane University researcher will work to develop a tool that could lower tumor recurrence in cancer patients, especially those with prostate cancer.

Released:
16-Oct-2018 11:05 AM EDT
Open in New Tab
Comment
JAP032891-Esqueda-synapses.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    16-Oct-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 702199

New Memristor Boosts Accuracy and Efficiency For Neural Networks on an Atomic Scale

American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Hardware that mimics the neural circuitry of the brain requires building blocks that can adjust how they synapse. One such approach, called memristors, uses current resistance to store this information. New work looks to overcome reliability issues in these devices by scaling memristors to the atomic level. Researchers demonstrated a new type of compound synapse that can achieve synaptic weight programming and conduct vector-matrix multiplication with significant advances over the current state of the art. They discuss their work in this week’s Journal of Applied Physics.

Released:
15-Oct-2018 1:05 PM EDT
Open in New Tab
Comment
  • Embargo expired:
    16-Oct-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 702139

Amount of Weight Regain After Bariatric Surgery Helps Predict Health Risks

Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Measuring the percentage of weight regained following the maximum amount of weight lost after bariatric surgery can help predict a patient’s risk of several serious health problems. The study also revealed that the rate of weight regained was highest in the first year following maximum weight loss.

Released:
15-Oct-2018 12:05 AM EDT
Open in New Tab
Comment
APB01892APB-Algo-Rajagopal-B.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    16-Oct-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 702107

Algorithmic Innovation May Help Reduce Invasive Heart Procedures

American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Doctors use invasive procedures to decide whether an ablation procedure to remove heart tissue is likely to have a positive outcome. CT scans or ultrasounds are useful in determining the structure of a patient’s heart, but invasive electrical procedures are used to identify and localize the source of the atrial fibrillation. Researchers from the University of California, Santa Barbara have developed new algorithms to localize the source of an atrial fibrillation. They report their findings in APL Bioengineering.

Released:
12-Oct-2018 11:05 AM EDT
Open in New Tab
Comment
JAP026891-Sylvestre-reservoir-computing.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    16-Oct-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 702075

New Reservoir Computer Marks First-Ever Microelectromechanical Neural Network Application

American Institute of Physics (AIP)

A group of researchers in Canada reports the construction of the first reservoir computing device built with a microelectromechanical system. Published in the Journal of Applied Physics, the neural network exploits the nonlinear dynamics of a microscale silicon beam to perform its calculations. The group’s work looks to create devices that can act simultaneously as a sensor and a computer using a fraction of the energy a normal computer would use.

Released:
11-Oct-2018 2:05 PM EDT
Open in New Tab
Comment
  • Embargo expired:
    16-Oct-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 701702

Unlike obese adults, obese children don’t have more pain after surgery

American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA)

SAN FRANCISCO – While obese adults often report more pain after surgery, the same does not appear to be true for obese children, according to the largest study of its kind, being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2018 annual meeting.

Released:
8-Oct-2018 8:00 AM EDT
Open in New Tab
Embargo will expire:
18-Oct-2018 11:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
16-Oct-2018 10:30 AM EDT

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 18-Oct-2018 11:00 AM EDT

The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application.
If you have not yet registered, please do so. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Article ID: 702274

Religious Leaders’ Support May Be Key to Modern Contraception Use

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Women in Nigeria whose clerics extol the benefits of family planning were significantly more likely to adopt modern contraceptive methods, new research suggests, highlighting the importance of engaging religious leaders to help increase the country’s stubbornly low uptake of family planning services.

Released:
16-Oct-2018 10:20 AM EDT
Open in New Tab
Comment

Social and Behavioral Sciences


Showing results

110 of 204752

Chat now!